Serum levels of oxidative stress indicators and antioxidant enzymes in Bell palsy | Ear, Nose & Throat Journal Skip to content Skip to navigation

Serum levels of oxidative stress indicators and antioxidant enzymes in Bell palsy

| Reprints
November 8, 2018
by Nazim Bozan, MD; Ömer Faruk Kocak, MD; Canser Yılmaz Demir, MD; Mehmet Emre Dinc, MD; Koray Avcı, MD; Halit Demir, PhD; Ahmet Faruk Kıroglu, MD

Abstract

We conducted a prospective study to comparatively evaluate serum levels of malondialdehyde, an oxidative stress indicator, and the antioxidant enzymes glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase in patients with Bell palsy. Our study population was made up of 30 patients with Bell palsy-15 men and 15 women, aged 25 to 68 years (mean: 50.4)-who were seen in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at a tertiary care medical center. For comparison purposes, we recruited 26 healthy age- and sex-matched controls-16 men and 10 women, aged 40 to 67 years (mean: 54.3). Serum samples were obtained from all participants before the initiation of steroid treatment to the Bell palsy patients. A correlation was sought between demographic data and serum levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. We found that the serum level of malondialdehyde was significantly higher in the Bell palsy group and that the levels of glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase were all significantly lower (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Correlation analysis revealed that only superoxide dismutase levels were positively correlated with age (r = 0.347, p = 0.009). We suggest that oxidative stress and antioxidant mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of Bell palsy. In this context, serum levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase may serve as biomarkers in the diagnosis and follow-up of Bell palsy. Confirmation of the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of these findings necessitates further prospective, randomized clinical trials in larger populations.

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