Phonatory symptoms and impact on quality of life in female patients with goiter | Ear, Nose & Throat Journal Skip to content Skip to navigation

Phonatory symptoms and impact on quality of life in female patients with goiter

| Reprints
July 18, 2016
by Abdul-latif Hamdan, MD, MPH, FACS; Alexander Dowli, MD; Jad Jabbour, BS; Alain Sabri, MD; Sami T. Azar, MD, FACP

Abstract

Our objective is to report on the prevalence of phonatory symptoms and impact on quality of life in a group of female patients with goiter who had not been selected for surgery or who had not presented to the emergency room with respiratory distress. A total of 40 patients with goiter and 14 controls were enrolled in this study. Demographic data included age, sex, laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, allergy, smoking, duration of disease, presence or absence of compressive symptoms, presence or absence of thyroid gland nodules, vascular status, presence or absence of calcifications, and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Phonatory symptoms included hoarseness, vocal fatigue, vocal straining, lump sensation, and aphonia. The Voice Handicap Index 10 was used to assess the impact of phonatory symptoms on quality of life. The most common phonatory symptom in the patients with goiter was vocal fatigue followed by lump sensation. The only phonatory symptom that was significantly more present in patients with goiter was vocal straining. As for the impact of phonatory symptoms on quality of life, 15.8% of goiter patients had a Voice Handicap Index score >7 compared with 7.7% of controls. Phonatory symptoms are common in patients with goiter, with vocal straining occurring significantly more frequently than in controls. In 1 of 6 patients, the presence of phonatory symptoms had an impact on quality of life.

ENT Journal provides full text articles to our registered members.
Please log in or sign up for a FREE membership to view the full content:

You may also like to: