Metastatic chordoma of the tongue: Case report | Ear, Nose & Throat Journal Skip to content Skip to navigation

Metastatic chordoma of the tongue: Case report

| Reprints
March 24, 2017
by Sultan Bişkin, MD; Rabiye Uslu Erdemir, MD; Sultan Şevik Eliçora, MD; Sevim Aydınlı, MD; Şükrü Oğuz Özdamar, MD

Abstract

Chordomas are rare bone tumors that arise from notochord remnants. They most commonly occur in the sacrum, but they also can be seen in the skull base, cervical spine, and thoracolumbar vertebrae. Chordomas account for 1 to 4% of all primary skeletal tumors. They are usually indolent, locally growing tumors. Distant metastasis has been reported in 3 to 48% of cases. When metastasis occurs, it is usually observed in the lung, bone, and liver. To the best of our knowledge, no case of a chordoma metastasis to the tongue has been previously reported in the literature. We report such a case in a 61-year-old man.

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