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Laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in light cigar smokers

| Reprints
June 5, 2015
by Abdul-latif Hamdan, MD, FACS; Randa Al-Barazi, MD; Jihad Ashkar, MD; Sami Husseini, MD; Alexander Dowli, MD; Nabil Fuleihan, MD

Abstract

The aim of this prospective study was to look at the laryngeal findings and acoustic changes in light cigar smokers in comparison to nonsmokers, in the setting of a voice clinic. A total of 22 cigar smokers and 19 nonsmokers used as controls were enrolled in the study. Demographic data included age, number of years smoking, number of cigars per week, history of allergy, and history of reflux. The confounding effects of allergy and reflux were accounted for in the control group. Subjects underwent laryngeal endoscopy and acoustic analysis. On laryngeal endoscopy, the most common laryngeal finding was thick mucus. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of any of the laryngeal findings in cigar smokers vs. controls. In comparison with the control group, both the fundamental frequency and habitual pitch were significantly lower in cigar smokers (p value = 0.034 and 0.004, respectively). We conclude that cigar smokers have lower fundamental frequency and habitual pitch compared to nonsmokers.

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