Rhinology

Editors Picks

Mucormycosis (Mucor fungus ball) of the maxillary sinus

October 17, 2014     Hang Sun Cho, MD; Hoon Shik Yang, MD, PhD; Kyung Soo Kim, MD, PhD
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Abstract

A fungus ball is an extramucosal fungal proliferation that completely fills one or more paranasal sinuses and usually occurs as a unilateral infection. It is mainly caused by Aspergillus spp in an immunocompetent host, but some cases of paranasal fungal balls reportedly have been caused by Mucor spp. A Mucor fungus ball is usually found in the maxillary sinus and/or the sphenoid sinus and may be black in color. Patients with mucormycosis, or a Mucor fungal ball infection, usually present with facial pain or headache. On computed tomography, there are no pathognomonic findings that are conclusive for a diagnosis of mucormycosis. In this article we report a case of mucormycosis in a 56-year-old woman and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the “Mucor fungus ball.” To the best of our knowledge, 5 case reports (8 patients) have been published in which the fungus ball was thought to be caused by Mucor spp.

Distal nasolacrimal duct showing the valve of Hasner

October 17, 2014     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Recognition of the location of the nasolacrimal duct opening is important to prevent its damage while performing an intranasal inferior meatal antrostomy or creating a window transantrally in the inferior meatal wall during a Caldwell-Luc procedure.

Endoscopic view of an ostium in a concha bullosa of the superior turbinate

October 17, 2014     Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS
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A specific outflow tract or ostium of the superior turbinate, as was seen in this case, has been infrequently described or imaged.

Sinonasal tract mucosal melanoma

October 17, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Patients with obstructive symptoms, multiple sites of involvement, tumors of 3 cm or larger, an undifferentiated tumor on histology, a high mitotic count, and an elevated stage are more likely to have a poor prognosis.

An unusual case of acute periorbital swelling

October 17, 2014     Sara Torretta, MD; Alessandra Brevi, MD; Davide Pagani, MD; Lorenzo Pignataro, MD
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Abstract

Periorbital swelling is frequently encountered in ear, nose, and throat practices and, as it may be secondary to acute sinusitis, delayed diagnosis may lead to significant morbidity. We describe the case of a 24-year-old man with acute ethmoid-maxillary sinusitis and ipsilateral facial swelling particularly involving the periorbital area. We also discuss the workup that led to the formulation of an unusual diagnosis.

A rare occurrence of a fungus ball in the sphenoethmoid recess

October 17, 2014     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD; Ha-Min Jeong, MD
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A fungus ball usually appears as a calcification within the sinus, suggesting the presence of a foreign body.

Pedunculated cavernous hemangioma originating in the olfactory cleft

September 17, 2014     Kaiming Su, MD, PhD; Weitian Zhang, MD, PhD; Haibo Shi, MD, PhD; Shankai Yin, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Sinonasal cavernous hemangioma is a rare condition that usually affects the lateral wall of the nasal cavity. We report the case of a 77-year-old man who presented with severe epistaxis, nasal congestion, and olfactory dysfunction. Endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity revealed the presence of a red-blue tumor that had almost completely filled the nasopharynx. Preoperatively, it was difficult to distinguish this lesion from a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. During endoscopic surgery, the tumor was found to originate in the left olfactory cleft, and it had a long peduncle that contained blood vessels. Postoperative histopathologic examination indicated that the mass was a cavernous hemangioma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of an olfactory cleft cavernous hemangioma and the first case of olfactory cleft disease associated with a cavernous hemangioma to be reported in the English-language literature.

Chronic rhinosinusitis in patients requiring surgical repair of a midface fracture

September 17, 2014     Joshua C. Yelverton, MD; Peter Jackson, MD; Robert S. Schmidt, MD
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Abstract

Midface fractures commonly occur following trauma to the face and may cause changes in the normal sinus outflow system. To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the incidence of rhinosinusitis following midface fractures. We report the incidence of chronic rhinosinusitis in patients who underwent surgical repair of a midface fracture. Our evaluation tool was the 20-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test quality-of-life survey (SNOT-20). We mailed a demographic survey and the SNOT-20 questionnaire to 486 eligible patients who had undergone surgical repair of either a midface (n = 234) or mandible (n = 252) fracture; we had intended to use the latter cohort as a control group. Of the 234 midface patients, 34 (14.5%) returned a usable survey, but only 7 of the 252 mandibular patients (2.8%) did so, which was not a sufficient number for analysis; therefore we used normative data obtained from another study for comparison purposes. The mean SNOT-20 score in our cohort was 24.15, which was similar to the 28.7 mean score in the control cohort of patients with rhinosinusitis. The highest mean scores for the individual components of the SNOT-20 were for “Wake up at night,” “Lack of a good night's sleep,” “Wake up tired,” and “Frustrated/restless/irritable.” The components that the most patients found bothersome were “Facial pain/pressure,” “Need to blow nose,” “Runny nose,” and “Lack of a good night's sleep.” We conclude that patients who experience a midface fracture have a much higher risk of developing chronic rhinosinusitis that negatively affects their long-term quality of life. These patients should be monitored with long-term follow-up and treated appropriately.

Comparative study of intranasal septal splints and nasal packs in patients undergoing nasal septal surgery

September 17, 2014     Raman Wadhera, MS; Naushad Zafar, MS; Sat Paul Gulati, MS; Vijay Kalra, MS; Anju Ghai, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a prospective, comparative, interventional study to evaluate the role of intranasal septal splints and to compare the results of this type of support with those of conventional nasal packing. Our study population was made up of 60 patients, aged 18 to 50 years, who had undergone septoplasty for the treatment of a symptomatic deviation of the nasal septum at our tertiary care referral hospital. These patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the type of nasal support they would receive: 30 patients (25 men and 5 women, mean age: 23.3 yr) received bilateral intranasal septal splints and the other 30 (26 men and 4 women, mean age: 22.4 yr) underwent anterior nasal packing. Outcomes parameters included postoperative pain and a number of other variables. At 24 and 48 hours postoperatively, the splint group had significantly lower mean pain scores (p < 0.05). At 48 hours, the splint group experienced significantly fewer instances of nasal bleeding (p < 0.01), swelling over the face and nose (p < 0.01), watering of the eyes (p < 0.01), nasal discharge (p = 0.028), nasal obstruction (p < 0.001), and feeding difficulty (p = 0.028). Likewise, mean pain scores during splint or pack removal were significantly lower in the splint group (p < 0.01). At the 6-week follow-up, only 2 patients (6.7%) in the splint group exhibited a residual deformity, compared with 8 patients (26.7%) in the packing group (p = 0.038). Finally, no patient in the splint group had an intranasal adhesion at follow-up, while 4 (13.3%) in the packing group did (p < 0.05). We conclude that intranasal septal splints result in less postoperative pain without increasing postoperative complications, and thus they can be used as an effective alternative to nasal packing after septoplasty.

Focal hyperostosis of an intranasal inverted papilloma observed on computed tomography

September 17, 2014     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD; Ha-Min Jeong, MD
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Precise preoperative identification of the tumor origin is as important as detecting the extent of tumor invasion.

Balloon sinus dilation in the office setting

August 27, 2014     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Michael A. Munier, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas Jr., MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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The ability to complete operative procedures in the office setting avoids the time and cost of working in a hospital or outpatient surgical center operating room.

Two cases of pyogenic granuloma in pregnancy

August 27, 2014     Alex Fernandez, MS; Jason Hamilton, MD, FACS; Raphael Nach, MD
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Management and treatment of rhinologic issues in pregnant patients can be complex because of the limited availability of safety data.