Laryngology

Editors Picks

Bronchoscopic extraction of a chicken bone 5 years after aspiration

January 19, 2015     Parth Shah, MD; Angela Han, BA; Rishin Patel, MD; Paul Howlett, MD; Scott Akers, MD; Mitchell Margolis, MD; Sunil Singhal, MD
article

Abstract

A 58-year-old man with a remote history of choking on a chicken bone 5 years earlier presented with chronic cough but had no remarkable clinical examination findings. He was being followed for recurrent pneumonias complicated by a resistant empyema, for which he had undergone thoracotomy and decortication. Imaging studies initially missed a foreign body (the chicken bone), which was found on follow-up studies and was removed with a flexible bronchoscope despite the fact that 5 years had passed since the aspiration.

A case of transient cortical blindness associated with hypercapnia as a result of extremely enlarged adenoid tissue

January 19, 2015     Baris Malbora, MD; Nihan Malbora, MD; Zekai Avci, MD; Asburce Olgac, MD; Alper Nabi Erkan, MD
article

Abstract

Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is common among children, but it can lead to serious complications if left untreated. Among the well-known complications are obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, growth failure, cor pulmonale, and hypertension. One complication of adenotonsillar hypertrophy that has not been previously reported in the English-language literature is transient cortical blindness. We describe such a case, which occurred in a 6-year-old boy who presented with a sudden loss of vision and subsequent unconsciousness. He had experienced hypercapnia and was resuscitated via endotracheal tube ventilation. Laboratory and radiologic assessments found no pathology except for extremely enlarged adenoid tissue. Once the patient was stabilized, an urgent adenotonsillectomy was performed. The patient recovered well, and his vision and respiratory symptoms resolved. Severe hypertrophy of the adenoid tissue can cause hypercapnia and acidosis secondary to upper airway obstruction. The possibility of adenoid hypertrophy and hypercapnia should be kept in mind in cases of transient cortical blindness. Aggressive treatment, including early intubation and adenoidectomy, may lead to a rapid resolution of symptoms.

Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil presenting as otorrhea: A case report

January 19, 2015     Eelam Adil, MD; Dhave Setabutr, MD; Soha N. Ghossaini, MD; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a history of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil who presented with right subacute otalgia and otorrhea. Dedicated computed tomography of the temporal bones showed opacification within the mastoid process with destruction of bony mastoid septations consistent with coalescent mastoiditis. Preoperative imaging showed no destruction or expansion of the bony eustachian tube that would indicate that a direct spread had occurred. An urgent cortical mastoidectomy was performed. Intraoperatively, a friable white mass surrounded with purulence and granulation tissue was biopsied and returned as SCC. The discrete metastasis was removed without complication. Postoperatively, the patient was prescribed palliative chemotherapy. This case shows that a metastatic SCC can be masked by an overlying mastoiditis, and thus it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with a history of oropharyngeal cancer.

Primary calcitonin-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx

January 19, 2015     Arsheed H. Hakeem, MBBS, MS; Sultan Pradhan, MS, FRCS; Sanica Bhele, MD; Jagadish Tubachi, MS
article

The most troubling differential diagnosis for calcitonin-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the larynx is medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, as these two tumors can be morphologically indistinguishable.

Glottic myxoma presenting as chronic dysphonia: A case report and review of the literature

January 19, 2015     Christopher G. Tang, MD; Daniel L. Monin, MD; Balaram Puligandla, MD; Raul M. Cruz, MD
article

Abstract

Myxomas of the vocal fold are rare benign tumors often presenting with chronic dysphonia and less frequently with airway obstruction. The current consensus is that all laryngeal myxomas should be totally excised with clear margins to prevent recurrences. The recommendation for complete excision, however, has to be balanced with consideration of preserving vocal fold phonatory and sphincteric function. We report a case of vocal fold myxoma recurring twice after subtotal excision via two surgical approaches. This case illustrates a benign lesion with potential for recurrence and the need for a balanced treatment approach.

Adult presentation of laryngeal cleft: Utility of the modified barium swallow study in diagnosis and management

December 19, 2014     Genevieve Houdet-Cote, MHSc; Simon R. McVaugh-Smock, MHSc
article

We present a case of laryngeal cleft in a 41-year-old man to illustrate the co-occurrence of laryngeal cleft and tracheoesophageal fistula. We advocate the use of the modified barium swallow study in the diagnosis of laryngeal cleft. We also review the advantages and limitations of the various diagnostic methods, as well as the potential for known tracheoesophageal fistula to mask laryngeal cleft. Finally, we discuss the importance of early identification of laryngeal cleft in the context of its potentially serious health implications.

Laryngeal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

December 19, 2014     Fábio M. Girardi, MD, MSc; Ciro W. Fontana, MD; Ricardo G. Kroef, MD; Marinez B. Barra, MD; Felipe O. Detanico, MD; Nilton T. Herter, MD
article

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor seldom involves the larynx, as only about 50 to 60 cases have been described in the literature. Even though these tumors are often not aggressive, they have the potential for invasion and local recurrence. We describe the case of a 27-year-old man who was admitted to an emergency department with signs of upper airway obstruction secondary to an obstructive mass. Histology identified the mass as an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the subglottis. The patient underwent an emergency tracheotomy followed by a partial laryngectomy. During 14 months of follow-up, he remained free of active disease.

Fusobacterium necrophorum in a pediatric retropharyngeal abscess: A case report and review of the literature

December 19, 2014     Jeffrey Cheng, MD; Andrew J. Kleinberger, MD; Andrew Sikora, MD, PhD
article

We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed a deep space neck infection following cervical trauma. He was initially managed conservatively with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but when he failed to improve clinically, he required surgical drainage. Wound cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum, an uncommon pathogen that can cause pediatric deep neck space infections, especially when it is not associated with Lemierre syndrome. The prognosis for this infection is favorable when it is identified early. Treatment with culture-directed antibiotics and surgical drainage as indicated is appropriate. When treating a pediatric deep neck space infection empirically, physicians should avoid treatment with a macrolide antibiotic, since Fusobacterium spp may be involved and they are often resistant to this class of drugs.

Superior omohyoid muscle flap repair of cervical esophageal perforation induced by spinal hardware

December 19, 2014     Christopher Chase Surek, DO; Douglas A. Girod, MD, FACS
article

Cervical esophageal perforation is a rare and life-threatening condition. Its prompt diagnosis and treatment require a high index of suspicion. Cervical spine hardware is an uncommon cause of posterior esophageal perforation. Management has included a variety of musculofascial flaps for surgical repair. We present 2 cases of cervical esophageal perforation induced by spinal hardware that were repaired with a superior omohyoid muscle (SOM) flap for closure and/or primary closure reinforcement. Advantages and techniques of the SOM flap are discussed.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis presenting as bilateral abductor paralysis

December 19, 2014     Michelle Levian, DO; Reena Gupta, MD, FACS
article

Occasionally, patients who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis initially present with vocal and respiratory signs and symptoms.

Retropharyngeal masses in neurofibromatosis type 1: Imaging findings in 2 cases

December 19, 2014     Roy Riascos, MD; Jennifer Dodds, MD; Nirav Patel, MD
article

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) affects mesenchymal development via multisystemic manifestations. We present 2 cases of NF-1 that manifested as a retropharyngeal mass-1 as a lateral cervical meningocele in a 60-year-old man and the other as a focal neurofibroma in a 37-year-old man. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was invaluable in identifying the exact nature of the 2 lesions; no contrast enhancement was seen in the case of the meningocele, and enhancement was seen in the case of the neurofibroma. These 2 cases illustrate the importance of the history and contrast-enhanced MRI in managing NF-1 patients with a retropharyngeal mass.

Primary laryngeal tuberculosis: An unusual cause of hoarseness

October 17, 2014     Peter Fsadni, MD, MRCP(UK); Claudia Fsadni, MD, MRCP(UK), MSc(Lond); Brendan Caruana Montaldo, MD, FACP
article

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) of the larynx is usually associated with concomitant pulmonary TB, but approximately 20% of cases represent primary disease. We report the case of an 85-year-old woman with asthma who presented with a 6-month history of persistent hoarseness. Bronchoscopy confirmed the presence of a lesion in the hemilarynx, and histology identified tuberculoid granulomas that were suggestive of TB. Treatment with a combination of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol led to a complete resolution of symptoms. A high index of suspicion for laryngeal TB is required in patients who present with hoarseness.