Head And Neck

Editors Picks

Acute exacerbation of Hashimoto thyroiditis mimicking anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid: A complicated case

December 19, 2014     Hiroaki Kanaya, MD; Wataru Konno, MD; Satoru Fukami, MD; Hideki Hirabayashi, MD; Shin-ichi Haruna, MD
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The fibrous variant of Hashimoto thyroiditis is uncommon, accounting for approximately 10% of all cases of Hashimoto thyroiditis. We report a case of this variant that behaved like a malignant neoplasm. The patient was a 69-year-old man who presented with a right-sided anterior neck mass that had been rapidly growing for 2 weeks. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed clusters of large multinucleated cells suggestive of an anaplastic carcinoma. A week after presentation, we ruled out that possibility when the mass had shrunk slightly. Instead, we diagnosed the patient with an acute exacerbation of Hashimoto thyroiditis on the basis of laboratory findings. We performed a right thyroid lobectomy, including removal of the isthmus, to clarify the pathology and alleviate pressure symptoms. The final diagnosis was the fibrous variant of Hashimoto thyroiditis, with no evidence of malignant changes. Physicians should keep in mind that on rare occasions, Hashimoto thyroiditis mimics a malignant neoplasm.

Calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle

December 19, 2014     Sam S. Torbati, MD, FAAEM; Elaine M. Vos, BA; Daniel Bral, BA; Joel M. Geiderman, MD, FACEP; Benjamin Broukhim, MD, FAAOS
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Presenting signs and symptoms of acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli musclegenerally include severe, often debilitating, neck pain and odynophagia without any recent associated trauma.

Cervical presentation of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified

December 19, 2014     Alexander S. Misono, MD; Harrison W. Lin, MD; Linda N. Lee, MD; Judith A. Ferry, MD; James W. Rocco, MD, PhD
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Peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is an uncommon type of lymphoma with a clinically aggressive course and a relatively poor prognosis. Many affected patients present with nodal involvement, and there is also potential for extranodal involvement of the liver, gastrointestinal tract, bone marrow, and/or skin. We describe the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of an intermittently tender left-sided neck mass. Findings on imaging and fine-needle aspiration biopsy were inconclusive. Pathologic studies of excisional biopsy specimens ultimately revealed the diagnosis of PTCL-NOS. Of the lymphomas, neither PTCL nor the PTCL-NOS subtype is frequently discussed or studied in prospective trials. However, these cases should be identified because of their substantial clinical management implications.

Solitary peritoneal lymph node metastasis of head and neck cancer diagnosed with FDG-PET/CT imaging

December 19, 2014     Yong-Wan Kim, MD; Byung-Joo Lee, MD; Jin-Choon Lee, MD; Tae-Yong Jeon, MD; Hak-Jin Kim, MD
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Distant metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to the infraclavicular lymph nodes-with the exception of the upper mediastinal lymph nodes-is rare. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who was treated with surgery and radiotherapy for SCC of the floor of the mouth. During regular follow-up 6 months after the cessation of radiotherapy, F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected a hypermetabolic lesion in the left lobe of the liver that was diagnosed as a metastasis of the head and neck SCC; no locoregional recurrence was found. The metastasis was surgically removed and more radiotherapy was administered, but the SCC recurred at the same site and the patient died of disseminated disease 12 months after the appearance of the first metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a solitary peritoneal lymph node metastasis from an SCC of the floor of the mouth. We believe that regular FDG-PET/CT follow-up scans are useful for the detection of unusual distant metastases of head and neck cancers.

Temporal bone chondrosarcoma: Presentation of 4 cases and review of the literature

December 19, 2014     Duoduo Tao, MD; Matthew R. Hoffman, MD; Bing Chen, MD, PhD
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We describe 4 cases of chondrosarcoma of the temporal bone, which occurred in a 66-year-old man and in 3 women aged 34, 37, and 47 years. One of these patients was originally diagnosed with an epithelial cyst and another with a middle ear neoplasm. Three patients underwent surgical removal of their tumor, while the other patient declined (a craniotomy for biopsy was performed in this case). An accurate diagnosis in all 4 cases was not made until histopathologic examination was performed. None of the patients received postoperative radiotherapy for various reasons. However, the male patient experienced a tumor recurrence, which necessitated a second surgery, and he did receive radiotherapy after the second operation. All 3 operated patients were doing well at the most recent follow-up, and the other patient was soon lost to follow-up. Because of its rarity and potential for severe complications, temporal bone chondrosarcoma remains a difficult disease to diagnose and manage.

Simultaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the external auditory canal and thyroid gland: A case report

December 19, 2014     BeeLian Khaw, MD; Shailendra Sivalingam, MS-ORL; Sitra Siri Pathamanathan, MBBS; Teck S. Tan, MBChB, MRCS; Manimalar Naicker, MPath
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Approximately 25% of all cases of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) occur in the head and neck region; NHL of the external auditory canal (EAC) and thyroid gland are rare. Specific immunohistochemical staining of the excised tissue is required to confirm the final pathologic diagnosis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with underlying systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune hemolytic anemia that were in remission. She presented with chronic left ear pain, a mass in the left EAC, and rapid growth of an anterior neck swelling that had led to left vocal fold palsy. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone and CT of the neck detected a mass lateral to the left tympanic membrane and another mass in the anterior neck that had infiltrated the thyroid gland. The patient was diagnosed with simultaneous B-cell lymphoma of the left EAC and thyroid gland. She was treated with chemotherapy. She responded well to treatment and was lost to follow-up after 1 year. To the best of our knowledge, the simultaneous occurrence of a lymphoma in the EAC and the thyroid has not been previously described in the literature.

Complete second branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a fistula and a tonsillar cyst: An interesting congenital anomaly

October 17, 2014     Prasad John Thottam, DO; Samba S. Bathula, MD; Janet M. Poulik, MD; David N. Madgy, DO
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Abstract

Branchial cleft anomalies make up 30% of all pediatric neck masses, but complete second branchial cleft anomalies are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of a complete second branchial cleft anomaly that presented as a draining neck fistula and a tonsillar cyst in an otherwise healthy 3-month-old girl. At the age of 7 months, the patient had been experiencing feeding difficulties, and there was increasing concern about the risk of persistent infections. At that point, the anomaly was excised in its entirety. Our suspicion that the patient had a complete second branchial cleft anomaly was confirmed by imaging, surgical excision, and histopathologic analysis.

Submental nodular fasciitis: Report of an unusual case

October 17, 2014     Jiun Fong Thong, MRCS(Eng); Tiong Yong Tan, FRCR(UK); Shi Wang, FRCPA(UK); Paul Mok, FRCS(Glasg); David Loke, FRCS(Edin)
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Abstract

A 30-year-old woman presented for evaluation of a hard, enlarging, submental mass that was fixed to the underlying mandible. Fine-needle aspiration cytology initially led to a diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma, which was unusual given the superficial location of the lesion on computed tomography. The lesion was a well-defined rim-enhancing mass, and it had displaced adjacent structures medially. Intraoperatively, the mass was found to abut against and erode the mandibular cortex. A diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was established by histologic analysis. Such a location for this tumor is unusual. The prognosis for patients with this benign condition is excellent following complete surgical excision. We discuss the clinical presentation and the cytologic, histologic, and radiologic features of this uncommon entity.

Black thyroid

October 17, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MPH, MD; Henry Crist, MD; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
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Despite the benign impact of minocycline on thyroid function, several studies have reported an association between black thyroid and thyroid cancer.

Transoral approach to a deep-lobe parotid tumor

October 17, 2014     Lyndon Gonzalez, BS; Alex Fernandez, MS; Belinda Mantle, MD
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Because of their location in this potential space, parapharyngeal tumors tend to be asymptomatic and remain undetected for a long time.

A persistent left superior vena cava, with the accessory nerve passing through a duplicate segment of the left internal jugular vein: A unique presentation

October 17, 2014     Omar Ayoub, MSc, FRCSEd(ORL-HNS); Jamie Benton, MRCS; Shaun Jackson, FRCSEd
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Abstract

The internal jugular vein and the spinal accessory nerve are important landmarks during neck dissection; unexpected variations in their positions can result in inadvertent iatrogenic damage to adjacent structures. We report the case of a 79-year-old man who was found during neck dissection to have a duplicate segment of his left internal jugular vein (IJV), a persistent left superior vena cava, and an absent right superior vena cava. The spinal accessory nerve passed through the duplicate section of the IJV. A MEDLINE search found no previously reported case of these anomalies occurring together. We also review 10 previously reported cases of IJV duplication. Finally, we discuss the embryologic and anatomic background of these malformations so that otolaryngologists may be aware that identification of such anomalies may help to prevent postoperative morbidity.

Medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a supraglottic mass

October 17, 2014     Jeremy White, MD; Ahmed Mohyeldin, MD, PhD; Arnold Schwartz, MD, PhD; Steven Bielamowicz, MD
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Abstract

We report a rare case of medullary thyroid carcinoma that presented as a metastasis to the supraglottic larynx. A 92-year-old man with a 3-month history of voice change and airway obstruction was diagnosed with medullary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the supraglottis. Excision of the mass, total thyroidectomy, and elective neck dissection were recommended, but the patient declined because of his advanced age. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is a rare neuroendocrine tumor with a poor prognosis when associated with a distant metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid presenting as a supraglottic mass. Total thyroidectomy, neck dissection, and surgical excision of the entire tumor comprise the treatment of choice.