Speech therapy helps stuttering: Survey results released

July 30, 2009
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A recent online survey conducted by the National Stuttering Association found that speech therapy helps the majority of people who stutter, but that 30% of parents have received bad advice about stuttering from pediatricians and speech therapists. The survey, which received responses from 1,235 participants, also revealed that:

• Speech therapies that change attitudes toward stuttering are more successful than therapies that focus on speech mechanics. • People who had speech therapy from a speech-language pathologist who is a Board Recognized Specialist in Fluency Disorders had more successful speech therapy than those who did not. • Alternative treatments for stuttering such as psychological counseling, prescription medication, and assistive devices help some people but are significantly less effective than speech therapy. • People who participate in stuttering support groups report fewer negative effects of stuttering and more successful speech therapy than those who do not.

The National Stuttering Association is a nonprofit organization that helps adults and children who stutter with support activities, educational programs, publications, and advocacy. The full survery report is available at

www.WeStutter.org/.