Submental nodular fasciitis: Report of an unusual case

October 17, 2014     Jiun Fong Thong, MRCS(Eng); Tiong Yong Tan, FRCR(UK); Shi Wang, FRCPA(UK); Paul Mok, FRCS(Glasg); David Loke, FRCS(Edin)
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Abstract

A 30-year-old woman presented for evaluation of a hard, enlarging, submental mass that was fixed to the underlying mandible. Fine-needle aspiration cytology initially led to a diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma, which was unusual given the superficial location of the lesion on computed tomography. The lesion was a well-defined rim-enhancing mass, and it had displaced adjacent structures medially. Intraoperatively, the mass was found to abut against and erode the mandibular cortex. A diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was established by histologic analysis. Such a location for this tumor is unusual. The prognosis for patients with this benign condition is excellent following complete surgical excision. We discuss the clinical presentation and the cytologic, histologic, and radiologic features of this uncommon entity.

Introduction Nodular fasciitis is a benign proliferation of fibroblasts. It is an interesting condition as the lesion is often mistaken for a malignancy clinically and for a pleomorphic adenoma cytologically. The prognosis for patients with this condition is excellent following complete surgical excision of the mass. We describe a case of nodular...

Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath in the external auditory canal

October 17, 2014     Margherita Trani, MD; Massimo Zanni, MD; Paolo Gambelli, MD
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Abstract

Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) and pigmented villonodular synovitis belong to the same type of benign proliferative lesions originating in the synovia that usually affect the joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. They frequently involve the hands, knees, ankles, and feet. We report a case of GCTTS in the external auditory canal in a 53-year-old woman who presented with hearing loss, fullness, and a sessile lesion protruding from the anterior wall of her external ear canal. The 1.5-cm diameter mass was spherical, well encapsulated, firm, and covered with normal skin. The lesion was completely excised, and the patient's symptoms resolved. No recurrence was detected at 2 years of follow-up.

Introduction Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) and pigmented villonodular synovitis belong to the same type of benign proliferative lesions originating in the synovia that usually affect the joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths.1 Tumors with similar histology have been described in the pancreas, ovary, larynx, urinary tract, and...

Hypopharyngeal hemangioma in an adult: A case report

October 17, 2014     Lindsay Reder, MD; Sunil Verma, MD; Niels Kokot, MD
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Abstract

Hemangiomas of the postcricoid region have been reported almost exclusively in infants and young children. Our adult patient with symptoms of dysphagia and weight loss underwent transoral CO2 laser microsurgery of a postcricoid mass, and final pathologic examination confirmed the presence of a hemangioma. She is doing well after surgery, with an excellent voice, resolution of dysphagia, and no evidence of recurrence. There have been few cases of hypopharyngeal hemangioma in the adult population; to our knowledge, there have been no reports in the English-language literature of adult patients diagnosed specifically with a postcricoid hemangioma. Otolaryngologists should be familiar with the presentation and treatment of this unusual entity.

Rapid growth of a laryngeal oncocytic cyst after surgical irritation

October 17, 2014     John T. Sinacori, MD; Robert A. Jack II, MD; Jonathan R. Workman, MD
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The origin of oncocytic lesions remains controversial. They occur more frequently with increasing age, and patients commonly present with a prolonged duration of hoarseness

A 65-year-old man presented to an outside otolaryngologist for evaluation of dysphonia lasting 3 weeks. Symptoms started with an upper respiratory infection. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics and steroids. His dysphonia slightly improved, but indirect laryngoscopy 3 weeks later revealed a right false vocal fold polyp along...

Osteoma of the middle ear

October 17, 2014     Tsung-Shun Chang, MD; Wen-Sen Lai, MD; Chao-Yin Kuo, MD; Chih-Hung Wang, MD, PhD
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Management of middle ear osteoma can be complicated when the round window is obliterated. Therefore, the patient should be informed about what to expect prior to surgery.

A 14-year-old girl presented with progressive hearing loss and aural fullness on the right side of several years' duration. She denied otorrhea, trauma, or a family history of hearing loss. On examination, her right tympanic membrane was found to be intact, but a dome-shaped, bone-like mass was located just behind the eardrum, mainly in the...

Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear

October 17, 2014     Paolo Fois, MD; Anna Lisa Giannuzzi, MD; Carlo Terenzio Paties, MD; Maurizio Falcioni, MD
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Abstract

Choristoma of the middle ear is a rare condition characterized by the presence of normal salivary gland tissue in the middle ear space. Salivary gland choristomas are benign lesions that are frequently associated with ossicular chain and facial nerve anomalies. Total surgical excision is indicated when there is no risk of damaging the facial nerve. We describe a new case of salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear, and we discuss the etiology, histologic features, and management of such lesions. Our patient was a 22-year-old woman in whom we surgically removed a whitish retrotympanic mass. Intraoperatively, we also detected an ossicular chain malformation. Histologic examination of the choristoma revealed the presence of salivary gland tissue. Furthermore, the lesion contained an extensive and previously undescribed component: a well-defined pseudostratified respiratory-type epithelium, similar to that of a normal eustachian tube. Ten months after removal of the choristoma, we surgically repaired the ossicular chain anomalies. No recurrence was noted on follow-up.

Medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a supraglottic mass

October 17, 2014     Jeremy White, MD; Ahmed Mohyeldin, MD, PhD; Arnold Schwartz, MD, PhD; Steven Bielamowicz, MD
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Abstract

We report a rare case of medullary thyroid carcinoma that presented as a metastasis to the supraglottic larynx. A 92-year-old man with a 3-month history of voice change and airway obstruction was diagnosed with medullary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the supraglottis. Excision of the mass, total thyroidectomy, and elective neck dissection were recommended, but the patient declined because of his advanced age. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is a rare neuroendocrine tumor with a poor prognosis when associated with a distant metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid presenting as a supraglottic mass. Total thyroidectomy, neck dissection, and surgical excision of the entire tumor comprise the treatment of choice.

Hypocalcemia after minimally invasive thyroidectomy

September 17, 2014     Doug Massick, MD; Matthew R. Garrett, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to determine the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia following minimally invasive thyroidectomy. During the 2-year study period, 74 patients-16 men and 58 women (mean age: 43.7)-underwent either total or hemithyroidectomy through a 3-cm incision. Postoperative hypocalcemia occurred in 14 of these patients (18.9%)-4 men and 10 women-all of whom underwent total rather than hemithyroidectomy. All these patients received supplementation with calcium and vitamin D for 2 weeks postoperatively in order to regain a normal calcium status, and all demonstrated normal serum calcium levels at 3 weeks. Despite their low calcium levels, none of the 14 patients exhibited any overt symptoms of hypocalcemia. We conclude that minimally invasive thyroidectomy is associated with a low rate of postoperative hypocalcemia that is comparable to the rates previously reported for standard thyroidectomy.

Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the mandible: A rare malignant tumor

September 17, 2014     Rakesh Kumar Singh, MS; Saurabh Varshney, MS; Sampan Singh Bist, MS; Meena Harsh, MD; Nitin Gupta, MD
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Abstract

Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MCHS) is a highly aggressive, malignant, cartilaginous tumor that represents about 1% of all chondrosarcomas. Only about 50 cases of MCHS of the jaw have been reported in the English-language literature; maxillary tumors are much more common than mandibular tumors. We present a new case of MCHS of the mandible that arose in a 22-year-old woman whose initial two biopsies did not reveal the features of the tumor. The diagnosis was made only after an incisional biopsy.

Ear mold impression material as an aural foreign body

September 17, 2014     Yu-Hsuan Lin, MD; Ming-Yee Lin, MD, PhD
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Physicians should not rush indiscriminately into action without a careful otoscopic examination and a detailed history, to discern whether a patient has abnormal anatomy and is at risk for complications.

Although most patients who are fitted for a hearing aid experience no adverse outcomes, ear mold impression material does occasionally impact the ear. Most of the patients in whom this occurs have preexisting anatomic aural abnormalities. Hence, careful history taking and an otoscopic examination should be undertaken by persons entrusted with...
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