Rhinology

Nasal valve surgery: Assessment of quality of life with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory

May 7, 2014     Jaiganesh Manickavasagam, MRCS(Edin), DOHNS(Lond); Smeeta Wong, MRCS; Veronika Varabei, MBBS; Ullas Raghavan, FRCS(ORL)
article

Abstract

We used the 18-question Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) to conduct a retrospective assessment of quality of life following nasal valve surgery. We telephoned 53 patients who had undergone open rhinoplasty for the treatment of nasal valve collapse over a 2-year period. A total of 39 patients-24 men and 15 women, aged 20 to 50 years (mean: 38)-agreed to participate and answer the questions. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months (mean: 8). The spectrum of possible GBI scores ranges from -100 (maximum negative outcome) to 0 (no change) to +100 (maximum benefit); in our group, the median total score was +56 (interquartile range: +32 to +90.5) and the overall total score was +58. The three subscale components of the GBI-general benefit, physical benefit, and social benefit-were analyzed individually; the respective median scores were +46 (+21 to +71), +67 (+25 to +91.5), and +50 (+17 to +100), and the respective overall scores were +60, +59, and +50. Based on these findings, we conclude that nasal valve surgery significantly improves quality of life.

Rhinotopic therapy for refractory chronic rhinosinusitis: A study of 20 cases

May 7, 2014     Alan H. Shikani, MD, FACS; Karim A. Chahine, MD; Mohannad A. Alqudah, MD
article

Abstract

The management of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) after endoscopic sinus surgery is complex and challenging. We conducted a prospective clinical pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of a rhinotopic protocol for the treatment of refractory CRS. Our study population was made up of 20 patients-8 men and 12 women, aged 31 to 76 years (mean: 50.1)-who were treated in our tertiary care rhinology fellowship training program. The rhinotopic protocol consisted of twice-daily saline rinses, each of which was followed by the administration of a nebulized corticosteroid and then a nebulized antibiotic. This regimen was administered for 6 weeks. Thereafter, patients underwent a once-weekly endoscopic sinus debridement followed by topical intrasinus installation of a corticosteroid and antibiotic. The duration of follow-up was 24 weeks, and thus the total study duration was 30 weeks. Treatment outcomes were based on Lund-Kennedy symptom scores and Lund-Kennedy endoscopic appearance scores. We found a 56% improvement in the mean symptom score after 3 weeks of therapy and 77% after 6 weeks. Subsequent follow-up revealed 90% improvement 4 weeks following the completion of therapy and 95% at 8 weeks post-therapy. Thereafter, we saw a small decrease in improvement: 73% at 16 weeks of follow-up and 65% at 24 weeks. Analysis of endoscopic appearance scores revealed a 55% improvement at 3 weeks of therapy and 84% at 6 weeks. The same general pattern emerged during follow-up, with 94% improvement 4 weeks after the cessation of therapy, 96% at 8 weeks, 76% at 16 weeks, and 75% at 24 weeks. Sinus cultures performed 4 weeks after the cessation of therapy found no growth in 13 patients (65%), normal respiratory flora in 5 patients (25%), a persistent pathogen in 1 patient (5%), and the emergence of a new pathogen in another (5%). Analysis of symptom scores and endoscopic appearance scores revealed that the rhinotopic protocol resulted in statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001) throughout the treatment period and follow-up period, although the improvement gradually declined over time. We therefore conclude that a rhinotopic protocol can be an effective treatment for refractory CRS.

Anatomic measurements of the anterior and posterior ethmoid arteries in cadaveric heads using endoscopic sinus instrumentation

May 7, 2014     Zeeshan S. Aziz, MD; Ninef E. Zaya, MD; Richard M. Bass, MD
article

Abstract

The challenges of endoscopic sinus surgery lie in the complexity of the anatomy of the nasal vault and side walls and the proximity to critical structures. Additionally, operating in a three-dimensional space while relying on a two-dimensional image for surgical navigation can be a disorienting task. Successful sinus surgery relies on the surgeon having a clear understanding of the anatomy and relationships within the operative field. We performed a study of 8 adult cadaveric heads to better elucidate the location of the ethmoid arteries in relation to an accessible external landmark, the nasal sill. Sinus endoscopy was performed on the heads to identify and measure the distance from the nasal sill to the anterior and posterior ethmoid arteries. We found that the distance from the nasal sill to the anterior ethmoid artery was approximately 6.0 cm, and the distance to the posterior ethmoid artery was approximately 6.7 cm. The interarterial distance was approximately 1.2 cm. With a better understanding of these vessels, surgeons will be better able to avoid them during surgery and thereby minimize the risk of excessive intraoperative bleeding and perioperative orbital hematoma.

Endoscopic modified Lothrop approach for the excision of bilateral frontal sinus tumors

March 18, 2014     Jiun Fong Thong, MRCS; Deyali Chatterjee, MD; Siew Yoong Hwang, FRCS
article

Abstract

We describe the use of an endoscopic modified Lothrop approach for clearance of an extensive sinonasal-type hemangiopericytoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses with bilateral frontal sinus involvement in a 44-year-old woman. The modified Lothrop approach is conventionally used to treat sinusitis, but with some slight modifications to the technique, it can also be used for tumor excision.

Endoscopic view of an inferior meatal polyp

March 18, 2014     Jae Hoon Lee, MD
article

Most polyps in the nasal cavity develop from the mucosa of the anterior ethmoid sinus, the contact areas of the uncinate process, and the middle turbinate so that they are observed in the middle meatus.

Schwannoma of the nasal septum: An unusual finding

March 18, 2014     Shruti Dhingra, MS, DNB; Jaimanti Bakshi, MS, DNB; Satyawati Mohindra, MS, DNB
article

Abstract

Schwannomas of the nasal cavity are rare benign tumors, and those that arise from the nasal septum are even rarer. When they do occur, they usually become symptomatic early because of the close confines of the nasal cavity. We describe a case of nasal septal schwannoma that was noteworthy in that the patient-a 28-year-old woman-waited 8 months after the onset of symptoms to seek medical care. Her symptoms included complete right-sided nasal obstruction, occasional epistaxis, and hemifacial pain. The tumor was completely removed via an endoscopic approach. We discuss the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and treatment of this rarely encountered neoplasm.

Early detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 serology assay

March 18, 2014     Achmad C. Romdhoni, MD, PhD; Nurul Wiqoyah, MS; Widodo Ario Kentjono, MD, PhD
article

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common head and neck malignancy in Indonesia. Overall, it ranks fourth in males and sixth in females as the most prevalent type of cancer in that country. The data show that in the year 2011, NPC incidence was considered to be intermediate (6.2/100,000 population per year). Through histopathologic examination, about 70 to 80% of these cases were found to be type III according to the WHO classificaton. NPC carries an excellent prognosis if treated early, but most patients presented with stage III to IV disease, which negatively affected the cure rate and increased the mortality rate. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) IgA serology has been established as an effective marker for NPC. Therefore, biologic markers, DNA, and/or antibody-based diagnosis is needed to decrease NPC cases. A screening program needs to be developed that will identify people at high risk of NPC and those who are in the early stage of the disease. In this study, 20 samples were collected from posttherapy patients. An otolaryngologic examination, histopathology of nasopharyngeal tissue, and blood testing for serologic markers were performed. IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed positive impact as a tool for confirming the diagnosis of NPC, but it still has to be combined with other specific diagnostic tools for post-therapy monitoring and for determining prognosis.

Aggressive inflammatory pseudotumor of the maxillary sinus and orbit

March 18, 2014     Sheldon Chong, MBBS, MS(ORL-HNS); Carren S.L. Teh, MBBS, MS(ORL-HNS); Shashinder Singh, MBBS, FRACS; Mun Kein Seong, MBBS, MPath; Subrayan Viswaraja, MBBS, FRCS(Edin), FRCOphth(UK)
article

Abstract

Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare, locally aggressive, benign neoplasm of unknown etiology. It is uncommon in the head and neck region, particularly in the paranasal sinuses. We present an unusual case of IPT of the maxillary sinus and orbit in a 27-year-old woman who presented with cheek swelling, right orbital swelling, double vision, and associated fever and trismus. Computed tomography identified a mass with radiologic features suggestive of a malignancy of the maxillary sinus and orbit; the mass extended into the infratemporal fossa, parapharyngeal space, anterior antral wall, and surrounding soft tissue. A diagnosis of IPT was established on the basis of histologic and immunohistochemical analysis, which identified a proliferation of bland spindle cells and a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate. Despite its aggressive appearance, IPT is associated with a good prognosis. Our patient was treated successfully with a combination of surgery, steroid therapy, and methotrexate. Chemotherapeutic agents are generally reserved for recalcitrant cases.

Unusual presentations of choanal polyps: Report of 3 cases

February 12, 2014     Ali Ozdek, MD; Halil Erdem Ozel, MD
article

Abstract

Most choanal polyps arise from the maxillary sinus, and they are called antrochoanal polyps. Their typical endoscopic and radiologic appearance makes them easy to diagnose. However, some choanal polyps originate in unusual sites in the paranasal sinuses and nose, such as the sphenoid sinus and the lateral wall of the nose. These polyps usually present unilaterally, although bilateral presentations are possible. We describe 3 cases of atypical choanal polyps: a sphenochoanal polyp, bilateral antrochoanal polyps, and a giant antrochoanal polyp. In each case, nasal endoscopy and computed tomography clinched the diagnosis, and endoscopic surgery was performed to successfully remove the polyp. We discuss the clinical characteristics of these 3 cases.

Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus: A clinicopathologic study of 5 cases

February 12, 2014     Hidenori Yokoi, MD, PhD; Atsushi Arakawa, MD, PhD; Fumihiko Matsumoto, MD, PhD; Naoko Yokoi, MD, PhD; Katsuhisa Ikeda, MD, PhD; and Naoyuki Kohno, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus is rare. Its pathogenesis is still not clear, and it appears to have multiple causes. We report the clinical, clinicopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings in 5 patients-3 men and 2 women, aged 19 to 68 years (mean: 40.2)-with pathologically proven organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. In all 5 cases, we were able to successfully perform curative treatment via endoscopic sinus surgery. Our findings suggest that most organized hematomas are angiomatous. Immunohistochemical analysis identified the presence of proliferative activity.

Endoscopic view of sphenoid sinus illumination and transillumination

February 12, 2014     Ken Yanagisawa, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

The sphenoid sinus has been considered a more challenging sinus to view with the lighted guide wire; unlike the other three paranasal sinuses, the sphenoid sinus is “hidden” from view because of its more posterior location.

Osteochondroma of the nasal dorsum presenting as a nasal hump

February 12, 2014     Hakan Tutar, MD; Aykut Erdem Dinc, MD; Omer Uluoglu, MD; and Metin Yilmaz, MD
article

Abstract

We describe the case of a 24-year-old man who underwent open septorhinoplasty for the treatment of progressive nasal disfigurement caused by a nasal hump. Postoperative histopathology of the resected hump revealed that it was an osteochondroma. The patient showed no evidence of recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of an osteochondroma involving the nasal dorsum to be reported in the English-language literature.

PreviousPage
of 37Next