Otology

Vertebral artery dissection: An unusual cause of transient ataxia, vertigo, and sensorineural hearing loss

December 20, 2013     Leila L. Touil, MBChB; Glen James Watson, FRCS, DOHNS; Michael Small, FRCS
article

Abstract

We present the case of a 33-year-old man who was admitted with intermittent ataxia, vertigo, and sensorineural hearing loss as a result of a vertebral artery dissection following minor neck trauma. Our aim is to highlight the importance of obtaining magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and/or duplex color-flow imaging when presented with a case of fluctuating vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss with side-specific ataxia. Likewise, it is important to obtain the input of neurologists to optimize a patient's prognosis and minimize long-term sequelae.

Medial migration of a tympanostomy tube

December 20, 2013     Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
article

Case report: Dermal inclusion cyst of the external auditory canal

December 20, 2013     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Jonathan S. Kulbersh, MD; Paul R. Lambert, MD
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Abstract

Dermal inclusion cysts are benign masses that arise as the result of the entrapment of ectodermal components during embryogenesis. Their presenting symptoms are a direct result of the mass effect of the growing cyst. We describe the case of a 23-month-old girl who presented with a single, large dermal inclusion cyst in the external auditory canal. Our review of the literature revealed that only 2 other cases of a dermal inclusion cyst in this location have been previously reported.

Glial choristoma of the middle ear

December 20, 2013     Karen A. Shemanski, DO; Spencer E. Voth, DO; Lana B. Patitucci, DO; Yuxiang Ma, MD, PhD; Nikolay Popnikolov, MD, PhD; Christos D. Katsetos, MD, PhD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
article

Abstract

Glial choristomas are isolated masses of mature brain tissue that are found outside the spinal cord or cranial cavity. These masses are rare, especially in the middle ear. We describe the case of an 81-year-old man who presented with left-sided chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. He was found to have a glial choristoma of the middle ear on the left. Otologic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of finding such a mass in the middle ear and be familiar with the differences in treatment between glial choristomas and the more common encephaloceles.

Dehiscence of the high jugular bulb

October 23, 2013     Min-Tsan Shu, MD; Yu-Chun Chen, MD; Cheng-Chien Yang, MD; Kang-Chao Wu, MD
article

The conservative treatment for a high jugular bulb is regular follow-up with serial imaging studies to detect possible progression, even in asymptomatic cases.

Immunization guidelines for cochlear implant recipients

October 23, 2013     Barry E. Hirsch, MD
article

Patients who have a cochlear implant are considered to be at a higher risk of developing meningitis following otitis media. Whether this occurs along the electrode going from the middle ear into the cochlea or through a blood-borne pathway is unclear.

Extrusion of hydroxyapatite ossicular prosthesis

October 23, 2013     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Senja Tomovic, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
article

Extrusion of hydroxyapatite prostheses is unfortunately a common complication of middle ear surgery.

Medial canal fibrosis

September 18, 2013     Joseph A. Ursick, MD; John W. House, MD
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Medial canal fibrosis is an uncommon condition characterized by progressive stenosis of the bony external auditory canal.

Paraganglioma presenting as cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex

September 18, 2013     Selena E. Heman-Ackah, MD, MBA; Tina C. Huang, MD
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Abstract

We report the unique finding of a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma associated with a paraganglioma, also known as a glomus jugulare tumor, in a 52-year-old woman who presented to our department with pulsatile tinnitus, hearing loss, aural fullness, and disequilibrium. She had been treated for a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma 20 years earlier, at which time she had undergone drainage of the granuloma via subtotal petrous apicectomy. When she came to our facility approximately 20 years later, she had signs and symptoms consistent with a jugular paraganglioma, which was likely to have been present at the time of her initial presentation for the cholesterol granuloma. In fact, microscopic bleeding from the paraganglioma might have led to the formation of the cholesterol granuloma. The metachronous presentation of these two entities, which to our knowledge has not been reported previously in the literature, indicates the potential association of paragangliomas with the formation of cholesterol granulomas of the petrous apex.

Middle ear effusion in adult ICU patients: A cohort study

August 21, 2013     Bradley W. Kesser, MD; Charles Ryan Woodard, MD; Nicholas G. Stowell, MD; and Samuel S. Becker, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a prospective study of 74 adults-34 men and 40 women, aged 18 to 90 (mean: 60.2)-to determine the prevalence of middle ear effusion (MEE) among patients in the setting of an intensive care unit (ICU) and to compare the findings with those of a control group of non-ICU hospitalized patients. Other goals were to identify risk factors associated with MEE in ICU patients and to evaluate any association with fever. Both groups included 37 patients. MEE was present in 19 patients (51.4%) in the ICU group, compared with only 2 patients (5.4%) in the control group (p < 0.01; odds ratio: 18.5; 95% confidence interval: 3.9 to 88.3). In the ICU group, there were statistically significant associations between MEE and both the use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.03) and the use of sedation (p = 0.02). No significant relationships were seen in terms of length of stay, body position, the use of an endotracheal tube, the length of ventilation, and the use of a feeding tube. Fever was present in 8 ICU patients (21.6%) and 3 controls (8.1%), but none of the fevers was associated with MEE. We conclude that adult ICU patients have a high prevalence of MEE (51.4% in our sample) that is perhaps unrecognized. We believe that MEE in these patients is most likely related to altered consciousness, sedation, and mechanical ventilation. MEE was an unlikely cause of fever.

Ganglion cyst in the external auditory canal

August 21, 2013     Chi-Kyou Lee, MD; Mee-Hye Oh, MD; and Kye Hoon Park, MD
article

In rare instances, ganglion cysts of the TMJ can pre-sent as a mass of the EAC, sometimes without obvious communication with the glenoid fossa.

Thiersch skin grafting in otologic surgery

August 21, 2013     Helen Xu, MD; Natasha Pollak, MD, MS; and Michael M. Paparella, MD
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Abstract

Thiersch skin grafting is an old but highly effective surgical technique in otology. We frequently place a Thiersch graft after otologic procedures that either create a mastoid cavity or result in reduced skin coverage of a portion of the external auditory canal. The purpose of this article is to introduce this surgical technique to a new generation of otologists. We discuss its indications, the surgical technique, tips for a successful outcome, and postoperative care. A key to successful skin grafting is to perform the procedure about 10 days after the primary procedure to allow sufficient time for the formation of an adequate vascular bed at the recipient site. The goal in all cases is to achieve a safe, dry ear that is covered with keratinizing squamous epithelium. Thiersch grafting accomplishes this very well.

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