Other ENT Topics

The paramedian forehead flap for nasal lining reconstruction

March 2, 2015     Joshua D. Rosenberg, MD; Nikita Gupta, MD
article

The importance of reconstructing nasal lining defects cannot be overstated, especially for composite defects also involving the framework and skin soft-tissue envelope.

Unusual presentation of a midline neck mass

January 19, 2015     Yann-Fuu Kou, MD; Gopi Shah, MD, MPH; Ronald Mitchell, MD; Larry L. Myers, MD
article

Venous malformations are usually visible at birth, although deeper lesions may have normal overlying skin or a bluish discoloration. They grow proportionately with the child and can expand in adulthood.

Cherubism

January 19, 2015     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

When there is significant infraorbital maxillary involvement, the inferior rim of the sclera is more prominent, resulting in the classic “eyes to heaven” appearance.

Congenital airway anomaly of double aortic arch in a 2-day-old infant

October 17, 2014     Seo Moon, MD; Jessica Mayor, MD; Ramzi Younis, MD
article

Double aortic vascular ring is a complete vascular ring that is formed when the distal portion of the right dorsal aorta fails to regress and the ascending aorta bifurcates to surround and compress both trachea and esophagus and rejoins to form the descending aorta.

Lingual hamartoma associated with a cleft palate in a newborn

October 17, 2014     Opeyemi O. Daramola, MD; Mariko Suchi, MD, PhD; Robert H. Chun, MD
article

Abstract

A hamartoma is a benign malformation of native tissue that may occur in any area of the body. Hamartoma of the tongue is a rare developmental lesion. We describe the case of a pendulant lingual hamartoma in a 2-day-old girl that had not been identified on prenatal ultrasonography. We also review the utility of prenatal imaging options, the role of preoperative imaging, the mechanical relationship between lingual hamartoma and cleft palate, the histopathology of this tumor, surgical treatment, and emergency airway management.

Role of the otolaryngologist in the management of asthma

September 17, 2014     Mahmoud Ghaderi, DO, FAOCO
article

[Editor's note: This Guest Editorial has been adapted with permission from its publication in the Fall 2012 issue of Soundings, the Pennsylvania Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery's newsletter.]

Evidence-based update on tympanostomy tube placement for otitis media in children

July 13, 2014     Jeffrey Cheng, MD; Lisa Elden, MD
article

Controversy has grown over the indications, timing, and efficacy of tympanostomy tube placement compared with watchful waiting.

Reinnervation of facial muscles with only a cross-facial nerve graft in a 25-year-old patient with congenital facial palsy

July 13, 2014     Kamal Seyed-Forootan, MD; Hamid Karimi, MD; Esmaiil Hasani, MD
article

Abstract

The standard method for managing chronic facial palsy is the two-stage free-muscle flap. We report a case involving a 25-year-old patient who had facial palsy from her birth. Twelve months after the first stage of a cross-facial nerve graft, we found that the voluntary movements of her facial muscles had returned. Within the following 12 months, she gained complete recovery of her movements on the affected side, as confirmed by electromyography studies. This case demonstrates that neurotization of facial muscles in chronic facial palsy is possible. However, further studies are needed to define the trophic effects or trophic mediators that can restore function to atrophied facial muscles and to determine which patients might benefit from the cross-facial nerve graft procedure without the free-muscle graft procedure.

Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma

July 13, 2014     Rosemary Ojo, MD; Si Chen, MD; Liset Pelaez, MD; Ramzi Younis, MD
article

All children with rhabdomyosarcoma require multimodality therapy to maximize local tumor control. This can involve different combinations of chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy.

Survival characteristics of injected human cartilage slurry in a nude mouse model: A preliminary study

July 13, 2014     Bounmany Kyle Keojampa, MD; Jacob Pieter Noordzij, MD; Bohdana Burke, MD; Joseph Alroy, DVM; Vartan Mardirossian, MD; Alphi Elackttu, MD; Zhi Wang, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a study to examine the viability, host response, and volume retention characteristics of drilled human septal cartilage slurry when injected into an athymic nude mouse model. We injected 0.2 ml of the slurry into the hind limbs of 6 mice. The mice were sequentially sacrificed over a period of 180 days. Histologic reviews of the hind limbs were performed to determine the viability of injected chondrocytes, host response, and volume retention. Specimens were obtained and histomorphologic analysis was performed at 1, 30, 90, and 180 days after injection. We identified viable cartilage throughout the study. Cartilage injection was well tolerated, and minimal inflammatory reaction occurred without significant adverse effects. The injected bolus of cartilage was found to have progressively dispersed throughout the muscle over time. Our findings warrant further investigation with a larger cohort of nude mice or possibly human subjects.

Harmonic Scalpel versus electrocautery and surgical clips in head and neck free-flap harvesting

June 8, 2014     Nichole R. Dean, DO; Eben L. Rosenthal, MD; Bruce A. Morgan, MD; J. Scott Magnuson, MD; William R. Carroll, MD
article

Abstract

We sought to determine the safety and utility of Harmonic Scalpel-assisted free-flap harvesting as an alternative to a combined electrocautery and surgical clip technique. The medical records of 103 patients undergoing radial forearm free-flap reconstruction (105 free flaps) for head and neck surgical defects between 2006 and 2008 were reviewed. The use of bipolar electrocautery and surgical clips for division of small perforating vessels (n = 53) was compared to ultrasonic energy (Harmonic Scalpel; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) (n = 52) free tissue harvesting techniques. Flap-harvesting time was reduced with the use of the Harmonic Scalpel when compared with electrocautery and surgical clip harvest (31.4 vs. 36.9 minutes, respectively; p = 0.06). Two patients who underwent flap harvest with electrocautery and surgical clips developed postoperative donor site hematomas, whereas no donor site complications were noted in the Harmonic Scalpel group. Recipient site complication rates for infection, fistula, and hematoma were similar for both harvesting techniques (p = 0.77). Two flap failures occurred in the clip-assisted radial forearm free-flap harvest group, and none in the Harmonic Scalpel group. Median length of hospitalization was significantly reduced for patients who underwent free-flap harvest with the Harmonic Scalpel when compared with the other technique (7 vs. 8 days; p = 0.01). The Harmonic Scalpel is safe, and its use is feasible for radial forearm free-flap harvest.

Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss

June 8, 2014     Dennis J. Kitsko, DO, FACS, FAOCO
article

Children with hearing loss should avoid noise exposure, and families should be counseled to protect their child's hearing environment and to educate their children about the long-term need to avoid excessive noise exposure.

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