Laryngology

Using a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to prevent postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy: A study of 88 cases

August 27, 2014     Masoud Naghibzadeh, MD; Ramin Zojaji, MD; Nematollah Mokhtari Amir Majdi, MD; Morteza Mazloum Farsi Baf, MD
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Abstract

Complications of total laryngectomy can have serious implications for the final outcome of treatment, including pharyngocutaneous fistula. We conducted a retrospective study of surgical techniques to determine how to best prevent or decrease the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula following total laryngectomy. We reviewed the hospital records of all patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma at Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, from March 1989 through February 2005. We identified 88 such patients-80 men and 8 women. We divided this cohort into two groups according to the type of pharyngeal defect closure they received. A total of 37 patients-31 men and 6 women (mean age: 61.4 ± 5.9 yr) underwent primary closure along with a sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCMM) flap (flap group). The other 51 patients-49 men and 2 women (mean age: 61.3 ± 4.4 yr)-underwent standard primary closure without creation of an SCMM flap (nonflap group). Overall, postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula occurred in 9 of the 88 patients (10.2%)-1 case in the flap group (2.7%) and 8 cases in the nonflap group (15.7%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 0.612, 95% confidence interval = 0.451 to 0.832), independent of other factors. We found no correlation between fistula development and age (p = 0.073), sex (p = 0.065), or tumor location (p = 0.435). Likewise, we found no correlation between tumor location and either sex (p = 0.140) or age (p = 0.241). We conclude that including an SCMM flap in the surgical process would significantly decrease the development of fistula, regardless of age, sex, and tumor site.

Saccular cyst as a complication of medialization laryngoplasty: A case report

August 27, 2014     Brent J. Benscoter, MD; Lee M. Akst, MD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of deterioration in her voice and swallowing function, which had begun after she had undergone a medialization laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Findings on examination and imaging revealed that a mass had developed adjacent to the Silastic implant that had been placed during the laryngoplasty. The superior extent of the implant reached above the laryngeal ventricle. Endolaryngeal surgical resection of the mass was accomplished without the need to remove the implant. Pathologic analysis identified the mass as a laryngeal saccular cyst. Although laryngeal saccular cysts are uncommon, medialization laryngoplasties are not. This case represents a rare complication of medialization laryngoplasty in which an implant compressed the laryngeal saccule and led to formation of the cyst.

Postoperative management in laryngeal cancer with subglottic extension and histologically negative nodes: Which patients need adjuvant radiotherapy?

August 27, 2014     Federico Ampil, MD; Cherie-Ann O. Nathan, MD; Timothy Lian, MD; Roxana Baluna, MD, PhD; Edward Milligan, MD; Gloria Caldito, PhD
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Abstract

We conducted a study of 19 patients who had laryngeal cancer with subglottic extension (LCSE) and pathologically negative lymph nodes (pN0) following total laryngectomy and neck dissection (TLND). These patients had undergone surgery during a 17-year period from 1986 through 2002. Of this group, 9 did not receive postoperative radiotherapy (non-RT group) and 10 did (RT group). Adjuvant irradiation had been administered to those with additional histopathologic risk factors for recurrence. We found that recurrence rates in the neck were 44% in the non-RT group and 11% in the RT group (1 of 9 evaluable patients), and the corresponding 5-year disease-free survival rates were 51 and 89%. While both of these differences were clinically significant, neither was statistically significant (p = 0.29 and p = 0.14, respectively). The presence of LCSE was not known prior to or during TLND in 4 non-RT patients and in 7 RT patients; their corresponding neck recurrence rates were 50 and 0%. Two of 8 patients (25%) whose ipsilateral lobe of the thyroid gland was not removed experienced a stomal recurrence. We conclude that three factors can be used to identify patients with pN0 LCSE who may be candidates for adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy: (1) a failure to remove the ipsilateral thyroid gland lobe during TLND, (2) a failure to examine the level VI lymph node for metastatic disease status, and (3) unfavorable histopathologic findings.

Transoral removal of a large parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with the Harmonic Scalpel

July 13, 2014     Marcel Marjanovic Kavanagh, MD; Zlatko Sabol, MD, PhD, MSc; Sasa Janjanin, MD, PhD; Drago Prgomet, MD, PhD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 19-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented for evaluation of odynophagia, left-sided hemiparesis, multiple café au lait spots all over his body, and numerous subcutaneous and cutaneous neurofibromas. Imaging revealed the presence of two large neurofibromas-a 60 x 50 x 35-mm tumor in the left parapharyngeal space and an intradural tumor measuring 25 mm in diameter. We removed the larger tumor via a transoral route with the Harmonic Scalpel. The size of this tumor far exceeded the size of any other reported tumor removed in this manner. Various approaches to the parapharyngeal space have been described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a transoral removal of a huge parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with a Harmonic Scalpel.

Leiomyosarcoma of the parapharyngeal space: A very rare entity

July 13, 2014     Haim Gavriel, MD; Eyal Yeheskeli, MD; Gratiana Hermann, MD; Ephraim Eviatar, MD
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Abstract

Leiomyosarcoma of the head and neck is very rare, as only about 100 cases have been reported; of these, only 3 cases have been previously reported in the parapharyngeal space. We report the fourth such case, and we review the features of this entity. The patient was an 84-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department for treatment of an 18-month history of right-sided headache, a 6-month history of right-sided hearing loss and nasal obstruction, and a 2-month history of dysphagia. Physical examination revealed a bulge in the right side of the soft palate and the right lateral nasopharyngeal wall and complete obstruction of the right eustachian tube. Indirect laryngoscopy detected a bulge in the right lateral hypopharyngeal wall. Otoscopy revealed otitis media with effusion in the right ear. Imaging demonstrated a space-occupying lesion in the right parapharyngeal space that extended from the base of the skull to the level of the hypopharynx. Biopsy and histology identified the mass as a leiomyosarcoma. Metastasis to the brain was discovered shortly thereafter, and the patient died 10 months later. The unusual presentation of head and neck leiomyosarcoma requires a high index of suspicion and appropriate diagnostic imaging. Surgical excision is the recommended treatment when feasible; chemoradiotherapy does not appear to affect disease progression.

Invasive primary aspergillosis of the larynx presenting as hoarseness and a chronic nonhealing laryngeal ulcer in an immunocompetent host: A rare entity

July 13, 2014     Mimi Gangopadhyay, MD; Kaushik Majumdar, MD; Arghya Bandyopadhyay, MD; and Anup Ghosh, MS(ENT)
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Abstract

Primary aspergillosis usually affects the paranasal sinuses, orbit, ear, and lower respiratory tract. Laryngeal aspergillosis usually occurs as a result of secondary invasion from the tracheobronchial tree, more commonly in immunocompromised hosts. Primary laryngeal localization of Aspergillus infection is seldom encountered. We report the case of an immunocompetent 42-year-old man who presented with hoarseness and a laryngeal ulcer of fairly long duration. A malignancy was initially suspected clinically, but a laryngoscopic biopsy led to a diagnosis of invasive primary laryngeal aspergillosis. No other focus of aspergillosis was found on x-ray and computed tomography. After identification of Aspergillus niger on culture, inquiries revealed no exposure to steroids, cytotoxic drugs, or irradiation, and workups for malignancy, human immunodeficiency virus infection, tuberculosis, and diabetes were negative. Although isolated laryngeal involvement is rare, aspergillosis may be considered in the differential diagnosis of a chronic nonhealing laryngeal ulcer that is clinically suggestive of a malignancy, even in an immunocompetent host.

Acute vocal fold hemorrhage after phonosurgery

July 13, 2014     Joel E. Portnoy, MD; Catherine Capo, BS; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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In this case, the KTP laser was used to vaporize the bilateral vocal fold varicosities.

An unusual presentation of anterior subglottic stenosis

June 8, 2014     Harry V. Wright, MD; Kenneth C. Fletcher, MD
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Acquired subglottic stenosis should be suspected in any patient with unexplained dyspnea weeks to months following decannulation.

Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of ENT infections in a tropical hospital

June 8, 2014     Yok Kuan Chew, MBBS; Jack Pein Cheong, MBBS; Nambiar Ramesh, MBBS; Mohamad Din Noorafidah, MPath; Sushil Brito-Mutunayagam, MS; Abdullah Khir, MS; Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective observational study to determine the spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of organisms isolated in otorhinolaryngologic (ORL) infections. We reviewed the laboratory culture and sensitivity records of 4,909 patients-2,773 males (56.5%) and 2,136 females (43.5%), aged 2 to 90 years (mean: 45.3 ± 12.6)-who had been seen at two government hospitals in Malaysia. Of this group, 4,332 patients had a respiratory tract infection (88.2%), 206 had an ear infection (4.2%), 188 had a deep neck infection (3.8%), and 183 had an oropharyngeal infection (3.7%). The most common isolated organisms were Klebsiella spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible S aureus, coagulase-negative S aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We also identified the antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms. We conclude that since the spectrum of causative pathogens in some infections differs between tropical and nontropical areas of the world, tropical hospitals should not completely adopt the antibiotic guidelines for ORL infections that have been recommended for hospitals in nontropical regions. We hope that our review and analysis of local data will help practitioners in Malaysia develop an appropriate prescribing policy with respect to ORL pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility. The goal is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

Complex posterior arytenoid dislocation

May 7, 2014     Rima A. DeFatta, MD; Jenna Briddell, MD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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Arytenoid cartilage dislocation is an uncommon entity that is frequently misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis or paralysis. The most common cause of dislocation is endotracheal intubation injury.

Resolution of laryngeal granuloma with high-dose prednisone

May 7, 2014     Matthew L. Mesick, MD; Philip A. Weissbrod, MD
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Laryngeal manifestation of pemphigus vulgaris is extremely rare and typically associated with ulcerations, bullae, and crusting.

The role of contact endoscopy in screening for premalignant laryngeal lesions: A study of 141 patients

May 7, 2014     Marisa Klancnik, MD; Ivo Gluncic, MD, PhD; Drasko Cikojevic, MD, PhD
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Abstract

At their earliest stage, pathologic lesions of the laryngeal epithelium are macroscopically invisible. Ideally, these lesions should be detected before their clinical manifestations appear so that prompt management can be initiated. However, most diagnostic modalities are unable to detect early premalignant lesions. We conducted a retrospective study of the use of contact endoscopy in analyzing the vocal fold mucosal epithelium in adults who had been operated on at our hospital under general anesthesia for various nonlaryngeal diseases. After we identified 71 such patients who were smokers, we chose an almost equal number of nonsmokers (n = 70) for comparison purposes. In all, our study population was made up of 141 patients-51 men and 90 women, aged 21 to 78 years (mean: 52). All patients had normal findings on preoperative laryngeal endoscopy. Our goal was to determine if the routine use of this diagnostic modality is justified in selected cases. Contact endoscopy identified dysplastic vocal fold lesions in 4 patients and chronic laryngitis in 3; all 7 of these patients were smokers. Since early laryngeal lesions are not macroscopically evident, early detection of these changes by other means is associated with a better prognosis and easier management. Our study demonstrates that the use of contact endoscopy during general anesthesia as a standard diagnostic method in long-time cigarette smokers is fully justified.

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