Laryngology

Multiple plasma cell granulomas of the larynx in a young man

March 18, 2014     Courtney Shires, MD; Sandeep Samant, MD, FACS
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Abstract

Plasma cell granuloma of the larynx is a rare benign lesion of unknown etiology, with only 21 cases reported previously. We report an additional case of plasma cell granuloma in which a 26-year-old man experienced a 1.5 x 3.4-cm, completely obstructing subglottic lesion. Because of the patient's young age, history of hemoptysis, bleeding from his tracheostomy, and the rarity of plasma cell granulomas, the patient was assumed to have hemangioma until proven otherwise. He presented with a partially obstructing glottic lesion 4 months later. Both the subglottic and glottic lesions were excised endoscopically. Multiple modalities have been used to treat plasma cell granulomas, including radiation, endoscopic CO2 laser ablation, high-dose prednisone, and open excision. In our case, steroids were given in the interim between the 2 excisions. This is the first report of a patient with two laryngeal plasma cell granulomas and the 22nd reported case of laryngeal plasma cell granuloma.

Two cases of granular cell tumors of the head and neck at different sites

March 18, 2014     Mustafa Paksoy, MD; Mehmet Eken, MD; Emin Ayduran, MD; Gokhan Altin, MD
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Abstract

Granular cell tumor (GCT) is an uncommon, primarily benign lesion. We describe 2 cases of GCT. Patient 1 was a 38-year-old man who presented with a reddish, vegetative lesion that involved the posterior third of the left true vocal fold. Patient 2 was an 18-year-old girl who presented with a firm, slightly extruded submucosal mass in the posterior lateral third of the tongue. Both lesions were identified as GCTs on biopsy. Both tumors were removed surgically, and both patients exhibited no signs of recurrence during follow-up. It is important that otolaryngologists be familiar with GCT and its management. Although the length of follow-up has varied substantially in the literature, we recommend long-term surveillance, including regular clinical examinations and periodic imaging with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, at least until additional studies have clarified the natural history and recurrence patterns of GCT with greater certainty.

Conservative cricoid surgery for chondrosarcoma: A case report

February 12, 2014     Elena Gaio, MD; Giandomenico Maggiore, MD; Alessandra Canesso, MD; and Riccardo Artico, MD
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Abstract

We present the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with hoarseness and progressively worsening dyspnea. Findings on laryngoscopy and computed tomography strongly suggested the presence of a chondrosarcoma. The patient underwent open surgery for removal of the lesion with wide margins. Reconstruction was carried out with two segments of costal cartilage. Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are rare, malignant, usually well-differentiated neoplasms that should be treated with conservative surgery. Recurrences should be treated more aggressively.

Laryngeal tuberculosis: Use of videostroboscopy in diagnosis

February 12, 2014     Michelle Levian, DO; Amy Chapman, MA-SLP; and Reena Gupta, MD
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The diagnosis of laryngeal tuberculosis is often suspected clinically, but in patients with less specific symptoms, flexible laryngoscopy may reveal only an inflammatory picture.

Recurrent pyogenic granuloma in a noncompliant patient

January 21, 2014     David Galos, MD; Farhad R. Chowdhury, DO; Reena Gupta, MD; Yolanda D. Heman-Ackah, MD; and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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Patients occasionally develop multiple recurrent granulomas even after excellent reflux control (including fundoplication), voice therapy, surgical removal (including steroid injection into the base of the granuloma), angiolytic laser therapy, and other treatments.

Vocal fold fixation caused by penetration of a high-velocity steel projectile

January 21, 2014     Chau-Shiang Guo, MD; Chi-Kung Ho, MD, MPH; and Ruey-Fen Hsu, MD, MPH
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Abstract

Vocal fold fixation as a result of trauma caused by a foreign body is rare. We report a unique case of vocal fold fixation caused by traumatic penetration of a shard of steel in a 31-year-old steelworker. While the patient was at work, an airborne projectile suddenly pierced his neck and entered his larynx, causing progressive hoarseness and dyspnea. Flexible laryngoscopy detected no obvious foreign body, but it did reveal that the right vocal fold had become immobile. Computed tomography revealed that a 2.5-cm sliver of steel had become impacted in the right cricoarytenoid joint, which made the arytenoid cartilage unable to rotate. An emergency tracheostomy was performed with local anesthesia to construct a functioning airway, and then rigid laryngoscopy was performed with general anesthesia. The foreign body was removed with the assistance of a microscope and microscissors. Postoperatively, the patient immediately regained control of his right vocal fold, and he experienced no permanent injury.

Transglottic laryngeal paraganglioma: A rare location for this tumor

December 20, 2013     Secil Arslanoglu, MD; M. Zafer Uguz, MD; Demet Etit, MD; Murat Ermete, MD
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Abstract

Laryngeal paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that originate in the neural crest cells of the laryngeal paraganglia. Although the vast majority of these tumors are benign, they exhibit different types of biologic behavior that require different treatment modalities. Therefore, differentiation among these tumors is extremely important. We report a rare case of laryngeal paraganglioma that presented as a transglottic lesion in a 68-year-old man. The atypical location of the tumor led to difficulties in diagnosis and management. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third such case to be reported in the English-language literature.

Synovial sarcoma of the parapharyngeal space

December 20, 2013     Jagdeep Singh Virk, MA, MRCS; Dhafir Al-Okati, FRCPath; Hesham Kaddour, FRCS ORL-HNS
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Autoimmune swallowing disorders

December 20, 2013     Mursalin M. Anis, MD, PhD; Ahmed M.S. Soliman, MD
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Lung herniation: An unusual cause of dysphagia

December 20, 2013     Karen Mason, MBBS, MRCS, FRCR; Richard D. Riordan, MBBS, BSC, MRCP, FRCR
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Abstract

Lung herniation is a rare condition that can be classified on the basis of location and etiology. We report an unusual case of right apical lung herniation presenting with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the neck demonstrated an air-containing structure in the root of the right side of the neck, related to but separate from the anteromedial aspect of the right lung apex. The diagnosis of an apical lung hernia was confirmed using high-resolution CT reconstructions. This case highlights that, although uncommon, apical lung hernias should always be considered when investigating abnormalities of swallowing. Identification of an apical lung hernia on plain chest radiographs avoids further unnecessary investigations and surgical intervention. Knowledge of their presentation may avoid complications that could arise from neck interventions such as subclavian central catheter insertion.

Well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma arising from an area of an idiopathic acquired supraglottic web: An update

December 20, 2013     Napoleon Charaklias, MRCS, MSc, MCh; Zvoru G.G. Makura, FRCS (ORL-HNS); Sarah Mihangel, MBBS; Kenneth Maclennan, FRCS (Path); Anastasios Kanatas, FRCS (OMFS)
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Infection after vocal fold lipoinjection

December 20, 2013     Christopher V. Lisi, MD; Rima A. DeFatta, MD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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