Laryngology

Vocal fold fixation caused by penetration of a high-velocity steel projectile

January 21, 2014     Chau-Shiang Guo, MD; Chi-Kung Ho, MD, MPH; and Ruey-Fen Hsu, MD, MPH
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Abstract

Vocal fold fixation as a result of trauma caused by a foreign body is rare. We report a unique case of vocal fold fixation caused by traumatic penetration of a shard of steel in a 31-year-old steelworker. While the patient was at work, an airborne projectile suddenly pierced his neck and entered his larynx, causing progressive hoarseness and dyspnea. Flexible laryngoscopy detected no obvious foreign body, but it did reveal that the right vocal fold had become immobile. Computed tomography revealed that a 2.5-cm sliver of steel had become impacted in the right cricoarytenoid joint, which made the arytenoid cartilage unable to rotate. An emergency tracheostomy was performed with local anesthesia to construct a functioning airway, and then rigid laryngoscopy was performed with general anesthesia. The foreign body was removed with the assistance of a microscope and microscissors. Postoperatively, the patient immediately regained control of his right vocal fold, and he experienced no permanent injury.

Transglottic laryngeal paraganglioma: A rare location for this tumor

December 20, 2013     Secil Arslanoglu, MD; M. Zafer Uguz, MD; Demet Etit, MD; Murat Ermete, MD
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Abstract

Laryngeal paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that originate in the neural crest cells of the laryngeal paraganglia. Although the vast majority of these tumors are benign, they exhibit different types of biologic behavior that require different treatment modalities. Therefore, differentiation among these tumors is extremely important. We report a rare case of laryngeal paraganglioma that presented as a transglottic lesion in a 68-year-old man. The atypical location of the tumor led to difficulties in diagnosis and management. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third such case to be reported in the English-language literature.

Lung herniation: An unusual cause of dysphagia

December 20, 2013     Karen Mason, MBBS, MRCS, FRCR; Richard D. Riordan, MBBS, BSC, MRCP, FRCR
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Abstract

Lung herniation is a rare condition that can be classified on the basis of location and etiology. We report an unusual case of right apical lung herniation presenting with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the neck demonstrated an air-containing structure in the root of the right side of the neck, related to but separate from the anteromedial aspect of the right lung apex. The diagnosis of an apical lung hernia was confirmed using high-resolution CT reconstructions. This case highlights that, although uncommon, apical lung hernias should always be considered when investigating abnormalities of swallowing. Identification of an apical lung hernia on plain chest radiographs avoids further unnecessary investigations and surgical intervention. Knowledge of their presentation may avoid complications that could arise from neck interventions such as subclavian central catheter insertion.

Infection after vocal fold lipoinjection

December 20, 2013     Christopher V. Lisi, MD; Rima A. DeFatta, MD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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Well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma arising from an area of an idiopathic acquired supraglottic web: An update

December 20, 2013     Napoleon Charaklias, MRCS, MSc, MCh; Zvoru G.G. Makura, FRCS (ORL-HNS); Sarah Mihangel, MBBS; Kenneth Maclennan, FRCS (Path); Anastasios Kanatas, FRCS (OMFS)
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Autoimmune swallowing disorders

December 20, 2013     Mursalin M. Anis, MD, PhD; Ahmed M.S. Soliman, MD
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Synovial sarcoma of the parapharyngeal space

December 20, 2013     Jagdeep Singh Virk, MA, MRCS; Dhafir Al-Okati, FRCPath; Hesham Kaddour, FRCS ORL-HNS
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Esophageal perforation in a patient with diverticulum following anterior discectomy and fusion

October 23, 2013     Aasif A. Kazi, PharmD; Nancy L. Solowski, MD; Gregory N. Postma, MD; Paul M. Weinberger, MD
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 Most perforations are thought to result from esophageal retraction, direct injury during manipulation, hardware failure, or movement of cervical vertebral bodies during hyperextension.

Arteriovenous malformation of the neck: An unusual cause of hoarseness successfully treated with endovascular techniques

October 23, 2013     Joseph J. Gemmete, MD; Neeraj Chaudhary, MD; Aditya S. Pandey, MD; Dheeraj Gandhi, MD; Sameer A. Ansari, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Hoarseness is a common presenting symptom in patients referred to the otolaryngology clinic. An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the neck is a previously unreported cause of hoarseness. We describe the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness and vocal fold paralysis, which was caused by an AVM. She was successfully treated with endovascular embolization. Devascularization of the AVM resulted in symptomatic relief of the hoarseness and resolution of the vocal fold paralysis, presumably secondary to interval reduction in edema and venous congestion.

Office assessment of vocal fold hypomobility

October 23, 2013     Ronak Shah, MD; Rima A. DeFatta, MD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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Even though abductor-adductor fiber mismatch often leads to net vocal fold immobility, the preserved muscle tone sometimes permits glottic closure through compensation by the normal vocal fold.

A case of cicatricial pemphigoid of the larynx successfully treated with plasmapheresis therapy

October 23, 2013     Takeshi Kusunoki, MD; Katsuhisa Ikeda, MD
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Conventional therapy for cicatricial pemphigoid has consisted of the administration of a steroid alone or a steroid plus an immunosuppressant.

Case report: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil

October 23, 2013     Jeffrey R. Janus, MD; Sivakumar Chinnadurai, MD; Eric J. Moore, MD
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Abstract

Paraneoplastic syndromes include a variety of disorders that affect the neurologic, endocrine, mucocutaneous, hematologic, and other systems as a result of neoplastic disease. Although their presentations vary, syndromes occur when tumor antigens exhibit cross-reactivity to similar antigens expressed by these systems. The antigens in the nervous system are called “onconeural” antigens. Although many disorders are associated with a comparatively high incidence of paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes, only a few cases have been associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who initially presented with weakness and spastic gait. He was subsequently found to have a characteristic paraneoplastic tractopathy on thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. The subsequent workup and operative intervention identified a T2N0M0 SCC of the tonsil. Following resection, the patient's overall symptoms were significantly alleviated, and his gait improved. A thorough literature search yielded no other report of a tonsillar SCC with associated paraneoplastic thoracic spine tractopathy.

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