Laryngology

Acinic cell carcinoma of the posterior wall of the pharynx

April 27, 2015     Gökhan Erpek, MD; Ceren Günel, MD; Ibrahim Meteoğlu, MD
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Abstract

Acinic cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 2 to 6% of all salivary gland tumors. It usually originates in the parotid gland; the minor salivary glands and the upper respiratory tract are involved only infrequently. We describe a case of acinic cell carcinoma of the posterior wall of the pharynx in a 21-year-old woman. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of this type of carcinoma at this location to be published in the literature. The mass was excised, and the patient was referred for postoperative radiation therapy to reduce the risk of local recurrence, but she did not keep her appointment and was lost to follow-up.

Potentially lethal pharyngolaryngeal edema with dyspnea in adult patients with mumps: A series of 5 cases

April 27, 2015     Masafumi Ohki, MD; Yuka Baba, MD; Shigeru Kikuchi, PhD; Atsushi Ohata, PhD; Takeshi Tsutsumi, PhD; Sunao Tanaka, MD; Atsushi Tahara, MD; Shinji Urata, MD; Junichi Ishikawa, MD
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Abstract

In this article we describe 5 rare cases of mumps-associated pharyngolaryngeal edema. To the best of our knowledge, this report includes the first case of mumps-associated pharyngolaryngeal edema in a patient who had previously received mumps vaccination, and these cases represent the sixth report of mumps-associated pharyngolaryngeal edema in the English literature. All 5 of our patients with mumps infection were adults and manifested airway stenosis due to pharyngolaryngeal edema. This edema responded favorably to steroid treatment without tracheotomy. We conclude that a pharyngolaryngeal examination is recommended for patients with mumps infection. Steroid treatment is usually effective against pharyngolaryngeal edema; however, in certain cases tracheotomy may be inevitable.

Lipoid proteinosis of the larynx

March 2, 2015     Jagdeep Singh Virk, MA(Cantab), MRCS, DOHNS; Sonal Tripathi, BSc, MBChB; Ann Sandison, FRCPath; Guri Sandhu, MD, FRCS, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
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here is no accepted gold standard of management, but surgery should be used judiciously in selected patients to improve voice function and maintain the airway. Long-term follow-up and repeat procedures are usually required for disease control, and genetic counseling may be needed.

Necrotizing tonsillitis caused by group C beta-hemolytic streptococci

March 2, 2015     Jassem M. Bastaki, DMD, MPH
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Abstract

Tonsillitis and pharyngitis are among the most common infections in the head and neck. Viral tonsillitis is usually caused by enterovirus, influenza, parainfluenza, adenovirus, rhinovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (causing infectious mononucleosis). Acute bacterial tonsillitis is most commonly caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. On the other hand, pseudomembranous and necrotizing tonsillitis are usually caused by fusiform bacilli and spirochetes. Here we report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of necrotizing tonsillitis caused by group C beta-hemolytic streptococci.

Plexiform schwannoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2

March 2, 2015     Luca Raimondo, MD; Massimiliano Garzaro, MD; Jasenka Mazibrada, MD, PhD; Giancarlo Pecorari, MD; Carlo Giordano, MD
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Abstract

We report a case of plexiform schwannoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall that occurred in a 37-year-old man who had been previously diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Plexiform schwannoma has been rarely reported in association with NF2. Moreover, as far as we know, only 6 cases of posterior pharyngeal wall schwannoma have been previously reported in the literature, none of which was associated with NF2 and none of which was histopathologically differentiated in schwannoma or plexiform schwannoma. The patient was treated with laser excision of the tumor via a transoral route, and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up, he exhibited no signs of recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first reported case of a posterior pharyngeal wall schwannoma that occurred in association with NF2 and the first case in which the schwannoma was removed via transoral laser excision. This case illustrates that plexiform schwannoma is a possible finding in NF2 and that transoral laser excision is a safe surgical procedure in such a case.

A case of solitary fibrous tumor arising from the palatine tonsil

March 2, 2015     Takeharu Kanazawa, MD, PhD; Kozue Kodama, MD; Mitsuhiro Nokubi, MD, PhD; Kazuo Gotsu, MD; Akihiro Shinnabe, MD; Masayo Hasegawa, MD; Gen Kusaka, MD, PhD; Yukiko Iino, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a distinctive, relatively uncommon soft-tissue neoplasm that usually arises from the pleura. It occurs at various sites; head and neck lesions are very rare. While most of these tumors have a benign course, a small number have malignant potential. We describe a rare case of SFT arising from the left palatine tonsil in a 66-year-old Japanese woman. The mass was completely resected. Immunohistochemical studies were strongly positive for CD34 and bcl-2, mildly positive for phosphorylated protein kinase B and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and negative for platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and p53. These findings suggested that this tumor was benign. The patient showed no evidence of recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. We believe that the candidate prognostic marker should be checked to distinguish malignant from benign SFTs.

The harm of ham hocks: Foreign body impaction in long-standing multiple sclerosis

March 2, 2015     Anish Patel, MD; Jacqueline Weinstein, MD; Mandy Weidenhaft, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
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The incidence of foreign body impaction in neurologic dysfunctional swallowing, such as in multiple sclerosis (MS), has been not widely reported.

Minimally invasive drainage of a posterior mediastinal abscess through the retropharyngeal space: A report of 2 cases

March 2, 2015     Dan Lu, MD; Yu Zhao, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Foreign-body ingestion is a common cause of esophageal perforation, which can lead to a fatal posterior mediastinal abscess. Routine treatments include the drainage of pus through the esophageal perforation, thoracotomy, and videothoracoscopic drainage. We present 2 cases of posterior mediastinal abscess caused by esophageal perforation. Both patients-a 44-year-old woman and an 80-year-old man-were successfully treated with a novel, minimally invasive approach that involved draining pus through the retropharyngeal space; drainage was supplemented by the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and nasal feeding.

World Voice Day 2015

March 2, 2015     Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS, Editor-in-chief
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The 2015 theme is “Voice: The original social media.”

Bilateral Eagle syndrome causing dysphagia

February 2, 2015     Lyndsay L. Madden, DO; Roxann Diez Gross, PhD; Libby J. Smith, DO
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Patients with Eagle syndrome often report symptoms that include dysphagia, otalgia, throat pain, globus sensation, facial pain, headache, taste disturbances, and dental pain that worsen with chewing, head and tongue movements, and swallowing.

Mixed verrucous and squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

February 2, 2015     Giuseppe V. Staltari, BS; John W. Ingle, MD; Clark A. Rosen, MD
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The lesion was removed en bloc, including the involved thyroarytenoid muscle.

Bronchoscopic extraction of a chicken bone 5 years after aspiration

January 19, 2015     Parth Shah, MD; Angela Han, BA; Rishin Patel, MD; Paul Howlett, MD; Scott Akers, MD; Mitchell Margolis, MD; Sunil Singhal, MD
article

Abstract

A 58-year-old man with a remote history of choking on a chicken bone 5 years earlier presented with chronic cough but had no remarkable clinical examination findings. He was being followed for recurrent pneumonias complicated by a resistant empyema, for which he had undergone thoracotomy and decortication. Imaging studies initially missed a foreign body (the chicken bone), which was found on follow-up studies and was removed with a flexible bronchoscope despite the fact that 5 years had passed since the aspiration.

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