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Laryngology

A novel approach to excision of distal tracheal granulation tissue in tracheostomy patients with difficult anatomy

October 25, 2016  |  Allison Rasband-Lindquist, MD; Keith Sale, MD

Abstract

Tracheostomy predisposes patients to various complications. The most common late complication is granuloma formation; others include tracheal stenosis, bleeding, infection, and fistula development. Small granulomas may not require treatment, but large ones necessitate removal...

Novel management of an isolated comminuted cricoid cartilage fracture

October 25, 2016  |  Aurora G. Standlee, MD, CPT, MC, USA; Derek J. Rogers, MD, MAJ, MC, USA

Abstract

Laryngeal trauma is a rare occurrence that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Isolated cricoid cartilage fractures are exceedingly rare, and their treatment is highly variable. We describe a case of an isolated comminuted, uncalcified cricoid cartilage fracture...

Spontaneous laryngeal barotrauma depicted on CT

October 25, 2016  |  Daniel T. Ginat, MD

Laryngeal injuries may result from  external laryngeal trauma or, less often, internal processes such as iatrogenic causes and sneezing with a closed airway.

Clinical course of acute laryngeal hematoma associated with vocal fold fixation

October 25, 2016  |  Wan-Chun Tsai, MD; Jih-Chin Lee, MD; Chih-Hung Wang, MD, PhD; Hsin-Chien Chen, MD, PhD

Disruptions of the anterior commissure, multiple displaced cartilage fractures, and larger open lacerations require open laryngeal exploration.

Features of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal lesions in bullous pemphigoid

October 25, 2016  |  Masafumi Ohki, MD; Shigeru Kikuchi, MD, PhD; Atsushi Ohata, MD, PhD; Yuka Baba, MD; Junichi Ishikawa, MD; Hirohito Sugimoto, MD

Abstract

Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune bullous disease characterized by skin lesions, with or without oral lesions. The occurrence of pharyngolaryngeal lesions is very rare in affected patients. We conducted a study to investigate the characteristics of oral and pharyngolaryngeal...

Hemorrhagic polyp with large occult sulcus vocalis in a singer

September 19, 2016  |  Meghan O'Brien, DO; Libby J. Smith, DO

A sulcus can decrease the functional vibratory property of the vocal fold free edge and result in dysphonia.

Postoperative hypofunctioning of the thyroid gland after total laryngectomy

August 21, 2016  |  Sirshak Dutta, MS, DLO; Kaustuv Das Biswas, MS, DLO; Soumya Ghatak, MS; Dibakar Haldar, MD; Indranil Sen, MS; Ramanuj Sinha, MS, DNB

Abstract

Primary laryngeal carcinoma is a common cancer, predominantly affecting males. Hypothyroidism is an undesirable sequela of both surgery and radiotherapy, the two most commonly used modalities of treatment. For advanced cases, standard treatment protocol includes total...

Vocal fold granulomas

August 21, 2016  |  Helen Lesser, BS; Amy Rutt, DO; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS

Occasionally, even after excellent reflux control, surgical removal and steroid injection into the base of the granulomas, application of mitomycin C, and voice therapy, patients develop recurrent granulomas.

Hypopharyngeal strictures and webs

August 21, 2016  |  Mark A. Fritz, MD; Gregory N. Postma, MD

These thin, web-like narrowings can often be missed or underappreciated on contrast swallows yet can be markedly symptomatic.

Patient preferences in early glottic cancer treatment

July 18, 2016  |  Michael L. McNeil, MD; Derek R. Wilke, MD, FRCP(C); S. Mark Taylor, MD, FRCS(C), FACS

Abstract

Patients with early-stage glottic cancer are primarily treated with one of three options: endoscopic laser excision, external-beam radiation, or open conservation surgery. We sought to determine patient preferences for treatment when presented with a choice between CO2 laser...

Laryngeal amyloidosis

July 18, 2016  |  Karthik S. Shastri, MD; Amy L. Rutt, DO; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS

The diagnosis of laryngeal amyloidosis should trigger evaluation for systemic amyloidosis.

Lingual osseous choristoma

July 18, 2016  |  Daniel T. Ginat, MD, MS; Louis Portugal, MD

When they occur, symptoms of lingual osseous choristomas may include globus sensation, dysphagia, gagging, nausea, and irritation.

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