Head and Neck

A study of mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity in India: A rare tumor

August 27, 2014     Pankaj Chaturvedi, MS; Sandeep Lerra, MS(ENT); Piyush Gupta, MS; Prathamesh S. Pai, MS(ENT), DNB; Devendra A. Chaukar, MS, DNB; Jai Prakash Agarwal, MD; Anil K. D'Cruz, MS, DNB
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Abstract

Malignant melanomas involving the mucosa are rare and aggressive lesions. Their rarity has made the formulation of staging and treatment protocols very difficult, as most of the available information comes from case reports and small case series. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the behavior of melanomas of the oral mucosa in patients who were treated at Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, a tertiary care referral center for malignancies and one of the largest cancer centers on the Indian subcontinent. During the 22-year period from January 1986 through December 2007, we found only 13 such cases, which had occurred in 8 men and 5 women, aged 26 to 70 years (mean: 37.5). All patients had been offered surgery with curative intent. Mucosal melanomas have exhibited a greater tendency for distant recurrence than for local treatment failure, which is why adjuvant radiation therapy has not been shown to confer any consistent benefit. In our study, only 3 of the 13 patients (23.1%) remained alive 2 years after diagnosis, despite aggressive treatment. Tumor staging, optimal treatment, and prognostic factors for oral mucosal melanoma are far from clear, and further research is needed. Despite the small number of patients in this study, it still represents one of the largest series of oral mucosal melanoma patients in India.

Parathyroid adenoma

July 13, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Most of these lesions are identified in glands within their usual anatomic location instead of in an ectopic or supernumerary site.

Transoral removal of a large parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with the Harmonic Scalpel

July 13, 2014     Marcel Marjanovic Kavanagh, MD; Zlatko Sabol, MD, PhD, MSc; Sasa Janjanin, MD, PhD; Drago Prgomet, MD, PhD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 19-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented for evaluation of odynophagia, left-sided hemiparesis, multiple café au lait spots all over his body, and numerous subcutaneous and cutaneous neurofibromas. Imaging revealed the presence of two large neurofibromas-a 60 x 50 x 35-mm tumor in the left parapharyngeal space and an intradural tumor measuring 25 mm in diameter. We removed the larger tumor via a transoral route with the Harmonic Scalpel. The size of this tumor far exceeded the size of any other reported tumor removed in this manner. Various approaches to the parapharyngeal space have been described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a transoral removal of a huge parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with a Harmonic Scalpel.

Primary cervical thoracic duct cyst: A case report and review of the literature

July 13, 2014     Ameet Kumar, MS; T.S. Ramakrishnan, MS; Samaresh Sahu, MD, DNB
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Abstract

Thoracic duct cysts are uncommon entities that are usually found in the thoracic segments of the thoracic duct. The presence of a thoracic duct cyst in the cervical area has been rarely reported. Etiologically, these cysts can arise either as a primary growth or secondary to trauma, obstruction, or inflammation. This entity was first described in 1964, and only 33 cases have been previously reported in literature. Of these, 16 cases involved a primary cyst. We report a new case of a primary thoracic duct cyst, and we discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and management, with an emphasis on meticulous surgical technique. We also review the relevant literature.

Leiomyosarcoma of the parapharyngeal space: A very rare entity

July 13, 2014     Haim Gavriel, MD; Eyal Yeheskeli, MD; Gratiana Hermann, MD; Ephraim Eviatar, MD
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Abstract

Leiomyosarcoma of the head and neck is very rare, as only about 100 cases have been reported; of these, only 3 cases have been previously reported in the parapharyngeal space. We report the fourth such case, and we review the features of this entity. The patient was an 84-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department for treatment of an 18-month history of right-sided headache, a 6-month history of right-sided hearing loss and nasal obstruction, and a 2-month history of dysphagia. Physical examination revealed a bulge in the right side of the soft palate and the right lateral nasopharyngeal wall and complete obstruction of the right eustachian tube. Indirect laryngoscopy detected a bulge in the right lateral hypopharyngeal wall. Otoscopy revealed otitis media with effusion in the right ear. Imaging demonstrated a space-occupying lesion in the right parapharyngeal space that extended from the base of the skull to the level of the hypopharynx. Biopsy and histology identified the mass as a leiomyosarcoma. Metastasis to the brain was discovered shortly thereafter, and the patient died 10 months later. The unusual presentation of head and neck leiomyosarcoma requires a high index of suspicion and appropriate diagnostic imaging. Surgical excision is the recommended treatment when feasible; chemoradiotherapy does not appear to affect disease progression.

Papillary thyroid cancer in a gravid woman

July 13, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MD, MPH; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
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All attempts should be made to preserve the recurrent laryngeal nerve with resection of all gross tumor, particularly in cases of known contralateral RLN dysfunction.

Petrosquamosal sinus discovered during mastoidectomy, and its radiologic appearance on temporal bone CT: Case report and brief review

July 13, 2014     Hyun Joon Shim, MD; Seong Jun Song, MD; Ki Woong Chung, MD; Sang Won Yoon, MD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who underwent a mastoidectomy. Preoperative computed tomography demonstrated an unusually distended bony canal that passed through the superolateral portion of the right petrous bone. Intraoperatively, we identified the anomaly as a petrosquamosal sinus (PSS). This unusually dilated venous channel had arisen from the adjacent sigmoid sinus. A PSS is an emissary vein of the posterior fossa that courses along the petrosquamosal junction, connecting the sigmoid or transverse sinus with the extracranial venous system. While it usually regresses during fetal life, a dilated PSS occasionally persists into adulthood. Its anatomic course may lead to problematic bleeding during mastoidectomy.

Sebaceous carcinoma of the parotid gland: A case report and review of the literature

June 8, 2014     Alexander Manteghi, DO; Seth Zwillenberg, MD; Vivian Arguello-Guerra, MD
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Abstract

Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare malignancy primarily affecting the periocular sebaceous glands. Sebaceous carcinoma of the parotid gland is exceedingly rare, with only 30 cases reported in the literature. Our case brings this total to 31. We present a case involving a 57-year-old man with a slowly enlarging, right tail-of-parotid mass abutting the ear lobule with overlying skin discoloration. Excision of the mass with superficial parotidectomy was performed, and microscopic examination demonstrated sebaceous carcinoma with positive margins. Subsequently, the patient underwent a completion parotidectomy and inferior auriculectomy with no evidence of residual tumor. Six months after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, the patient remains tumor-free. The clinical and morphologic features of this tumor are discussed.

Metastatic ovarian sex-cord stromal tumor with annular tubules in a patient without Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

June 8, 2014     Kimi Dart, DO; Ted Schwartzenfeld, DO; Warren Brandes, DO; Anthony D'Errico, DO; Michael Stender, MD
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Abstract

Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCSTs) with annular tubules (SCTATs) are a small class of ovarian lesions that possess histologic features of both Sertoli and granulosa cells. Approximately one-third of patients with SCTAT also have Peutz-Jaghers syndreome, which makes these cases especially rare. Patients with non-PJS-associated SCTAT make up the remaining two-thirds; 20% of these cases have a metastatic presentation. Metastasis of these tumors to the head and neck region has only been reported in a few instances. In this article we report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with “a lump in her throat” and was ultimately diagnosed with SCTAT. We also discuss the current protocols in the diagnosis and treatment of this entity.

Rhabdomyosarcoma of the supraglottis in an adult

June 8, 2014     Alex Fernandez, MS; Reena Gupta, MD; Hootan Zandifar, MD
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Primary laryngeal rhabdomyosarcoma is an extremely uncommon malignant neoplasm in adults, accounting for relatively few documented cases compared with squamous cell carcinoma.

Endoscopic management of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea with septal graft and middle turbinate rotational flap technique: A review of 31 cases

June 8, 2014     Shawky M. Elmorsy, MD; Yasser W. Khafagy, MD
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Abstract

Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea poses a major challenge to rhinologists. Much controversy attends its cause, pathophysiology, management, and prognosis. It has been suggested that endoscopic placement of a septal graft with a middle turbinate rotational flap may represent the ideal approach to closing skull base defects. We conducted a retrospective chart review to compile the results of this approach in 31 patients with spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea-22 women and 9 men, aged 18 to 67 years (mean 38.5 ± 8.96) at diagnosis. After one surgery, success had been achieved in 27 of these patients (87.1%). The remaining 4 patients underwent a second surgery, and 2 of them experienced a successful closure. In the remaining 2 patients, a third surgery was still unsuccessful, and they were referred to the neurosurgical team for a shunt procedure. Thus, the overall success rate with the septal graft and a middle turbinate rotational flap was 93.5% (29/31). Septal grafts and middle turbinate flaps are easy to harvest and easy to place. Accurate localization of the defect, meticulous surgical technique, and cerebral dehydrating measures may improve outcomes. Further study of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea to better evaluate its pathophysiology and prognostic factors is warranted.

Condyloma acuminatum of the buccal mucosa

June 8, 2014     Rashmi Jaiswal, PhD; Manoj Pandey, MS; Mridula Shukla, DipNB; Mohan Kumar, MD
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Abstract

Condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced disease. It is usually transmitted sexually, and it frequently occurs in the anogenital area. A finding of condyloma acuminatum in the oral cavity is rare. Besides HPV, other risk factors for oral condyloma include chewing betel quid and smoking. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a 2 x 2-cm verrucous white patch on his buccal mucosa. He was habituated to both betel quid and cigarette smoking. A biopsy of the lesion identified it as a verrucous hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium with HPV-related koilocytic changes. The lesion was excised, and further histopathology identified it as condyloma acuminatum. The patient was disease-free 9 months postoperatively. The possibility of condyloma acuminatum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an oral white lesion. The most common treatments are surgical excision, cryosurgery, electrocautery, and laser excision. There is no known role for antiviral therapy.

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