Head and Neck

Keratocystic odontogenic tumor

September 17, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Bite-wing or orthopantomograph images reveal a well-defined, unilocular radiolucency with a smooth border, showing minimal bone expansion and even cortication.

Stylohyoid syndrome, also known as Eagle syndrome: An uncommon cause of facial pain

September 17, 2014     Erin L. Werhun, MD; Mandy C. Weidenhaft, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Harold Neitzschman, MD, FACR
article

Eagle syndrome is often a diagnosis of exclusion after other etiologies of pain are thoroughly investigated, and it can be determined via a physical examination and characteristic radiographic findings.

Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the mandible: A rare malignant tumor

September 17, 2014     Rakesh Kumar Singh, MS; Saurabh Varshney, MS; Sampan Singh Bist, MS; Meena Harsh, MD; Nitin Gupta, MD
article

Abstract

Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MCHS) is a highly aggressive, malignant, cartilaginous tumor that represents about 1% of all chondrosarcomas. Only about 50 cases of MCHS of the jaw have been reported in the English-language literature; maxillary tumors are much more common than mandibular tumors. We present a new case of MCHS of the mandible that arose in a 22-year-old woman whose initial two biopsies did not reveal the features of the tumor. The diagnosis was made only after an incisional biopsy.

Hypocalcemia after minimally invasive thyroidectomy

September 17, 2014     Doug Massick, MD; Matthew R. Garrett, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to determine the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia following minimally invasive thyroidectomy. During the 2-year study period, 74 patients-16 men and 58 women (mean age: 43.7)-underwent either total or hemithyroidectomy through a 3-cm incision. Postoperative hypocalcemia occurred in 14 of these patients (18.9%)-4 men and 10 women-all of whom underwent total rather than hemithyroidectomy. All these patients received supplementation with calcium and vitamin D for 2 weeks postoperatively in order to regain a normal calcium status, and all demonstrated normal serum calcium levels at 3 weeks. Despite their low calcium levels, none of the 14 patients exhibited any overt symptoms of hypocalcemia. We conclude that minimally invasive thyroidectomy is associated with a low rate of postoperative hypocalcemia that is comparable to the rates previously reported for standard thyroidectomy.

Paragangliomas of the head and neck: Imaging assessment

August 27, 2014     Alejandro Zuluaga, MD; Daniel Ocazionez, MD; Roy Riascos, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD; Carlos S. Restrepo, MD
article

Abstract

Paragangliomas are uncommon tumors that arise from the parasympathetic neuroectodermal ganglionic cells and have been described in numerous anatomic locations, most commonly in the abdomen. Head and neck paragangliomas are classified into carotid body (most common), vagal, and jugulotympanic types. Computed tomography is the initial imaging modality of choice for the preoperative assessment of the extent of paragangliomas. Magnetic resonance imaging and selective angiography provide more detail of the surrounding tissues and vasculature. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice.

A study of mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity in India: A rare tumor

August 27, 2014     Pankaj Chaturvedi, MS; Sandeep Lerra, MS(ENT); Piyush Gupta, MS; Prathamesh S. Pai, MS(ENT), DNB; Devendra A. Chaukar, MS, DNB; Jai Prakash Agarwal, MD; Anil K. D'Cruz, MS, DNB
article

Abstract

Malignant melanomas involving the mucosa are rare and aggressive lesions. Their rarity has made the formulation of staging and treatment protocols very difficult, as most of the available information comes from case reports and small case series. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the behavior of melanomas of the oral mucosa in patients who were treated at Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, a tertiary care referral center for malignancies and one of the largest cancer centers on the Indian subcontinent. During the 22-year period from January 1986 through December 2007, we found only 13 such cases, which had occurred in 8 men and 5 women, aged 26 to 70 years (mean: 37.5). All patients had been offered surgery with curative intent. Mucosal melanomas have exhibited a greater tendency for distant recurrence than for local treatment failure, which is why adjuvant radiation therapy has not been shown to confer any consistent benefit. In our study, only 3 of the 13 patients (23.1%) remained alive 2 years after diagnosis, despite aggressive treatment. Tumor staging, optimal treatment, and prognostic factors for oral mucosal melanoma are far from clear, and further research is needed. Despite the small number of patients in this study, it still represents one of the largest series of oral mucosal melanoma patients in India.

Transnasal endoscopic resection of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

August 27, 2014     Daniel Schuster, MD; Joel Cure, MD; Bradford A. Woodworth, MD
article

Abstract

Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare histologic subtype of odontogenic tumor. Treatment requires complete enucleation. We report what we believe is the first case of CCOT to be removed via a transnasal endoscopic approach. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our department by his dentist for evaluation of an expansile mass of the left maxillary sinus. The dentist had noted an area of hyperlucency of the left palate during a routine examination. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a large tumor. Complete resection of the tumor was achieved via a transnasal endoscopic surgical approach. Resection of odontogenic tumors is necessary because of their tendency to expand and produce a mass effect on surrounding structures. We believe resection via an entirely transnasal endoscopic approach is a valuable and important technique in the treatment of odontogenic tumors that leaves the patient with a more cosmetically acceptable postoperative appearance.

Papillary thyroid cancer in a gravid woman

July 13, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MD, MPH; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
article

All attempts should be made to preserve the recurrent laryngeal nerve with resection of all gross tumor, particularly in cases of known contralateral RLN dysfunction.

Primary cervical thoracic duct cyst: A case report and review of the literature

July 13, 2014     Ameet Kumar, MS; T.S. Ramakrishnan, MS; Samaresh Sahu, MD, DNB
article

Abstract

Thoracic duct cysts are uncommon entities that are usually found in the thoracic segments of the thoracic duct. The presence of a thoracic duct cyst in the cervical area has been rarely reported. Etiologically, these cysts can arise either as a primary growth or secondary to trauma, obstruction, or inflammation. This entity was first described in 1964, and only 33 cases have been previously reported in literature. Of these, 16 cases involved a primary cyst. We report a new case of a primary thoracic duct cyst, and we discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and management, with an emphasis on meticulous surgical technique. We also review the relevant literature.

Transoral removal of a large parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with the Harmonic Scalpel

July 13, 2014     Marcel Marjanovic Kavanagh, MD; Zlatko Sabol, MD, PhD, MSc; Sasa Janjanin, MD, PhD; Drago Prgomet, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 19-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented for evaluation of odynophagia, left-sided hemiparesis, multiple café au lait spots all over his body, and numerous subcutaneous and cutaneous neurofibromas. Imaging revealed the presence of two large neurofibromas-a 60 x 50 x 35-mm tumor in the left parapharyngeal space and an intradural tumor measuring 25 mm in diameter. We removed the larger tumor via a transoral route with the Harmonic Scalpel. The size of this tumor far exceeded the size of any other reported tumor removed in this manner. Various approaches to the parapharyngeal space have been described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a transoral removal of a huge parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with a Harmonic Scalpel.

Parathyroid adenoma

July 13, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Most of these lesions are identified in glands within their usual anatomic location instead of in an ectopic or supernumerary site.

Petrosquamosal sinus discovered during mastoidectomy, and its radiologic appearance on temporal bone CT: Case report and brief review

July 13, 2014     Hyun Joon Shim, MD; Seong Jun Song, MD; Ki Woong Chung, MD; Sang Won Yoon, MD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who underwent a mastoidectomy. Preoperative computed tomography demonstrated an unusually distended bony canal that passed through the superolateral portion of the right petrous bone. Intraoperatively, we identified the anomaly as a petrosquamosal sinus (PSS). This unusually dilated venous channel had arisen from the adjacent sigmoid sinus. A PSS is an emissary vein of the posterior fossa that courses along the petrosquamosal junction, connecting the sigmoid or transverse sinus with the extracranial venous system. While it usually regresses during fetal life, a dilated PSS occasionally persists into adulthood. Its anatomic course may lead to problematic bleeding during mastoidectomy.

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