Head and Neck

Metastatic ovarian sex-cord stromal tumor with annular tubules in a patient without Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

June 8, 2014     Kimi Dart, DO; Ted Schwartzenfeld, DO; Warren Brandes, DO; Anthony D'Errico, DO; Michael Stender, MD
article

Abstract

Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCSTs) with annular tubules (SCTATs) are a small class of ovarian lesions that possess histologic features of both Sertoli and granulosa cells. Approximately one-third of patients with SCTAT also have Peutz-Jaghers syndreome, which makes these cases especially rare. Patients with non-PJS-associated SCTAT make up the remaining two-thirds; 20% of these cases have a metastatic presentation. Metastasis of these tumors to the head and neck region has only been reported in a few instances. In this article we report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with “a lump in her throat” and was ultimately diagnosed with SCTAT. We also discuss the current protocols in the diagnosis and treatment of this entity.

Rhabdomyosarcoma of the supraglottis in an adult

June 8, 2014     Alex Fernandez, MS; Reena Gupta, MD; Hootan Zandifar, MD
article

Primary laryngeal rhabdomyosarcoma is an extremely uncommon malignant neoplasm in adults, accounting for relatively few documented cases compared with squamous cell carcinoma.

Extensive basal cell carcinoma of the face: An extreme case of denial

June 8, 2014     Soroush Zaghi, MD; Pedram Ghasri, MD; Paul Busse, MD, PhD; John Clark, MD; Kevin Emerick, MD
article

Abstract

Patients with head and neck cancer are particularly susceptible to using denial as a coping mechanism. While some forms of denial may help patients achieve better levels of physical functioning, persistent denial can serve as a major barrier to treatment. We report a case of extreme denial by a 60-year-old woman with an extensive basal cell carcinoma of the face that had been neglected for more than 20 years. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential danger of denial, and we discuss strategies that physicians can undertake to properly manage patients who engage in it. Since the diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer can result in profound psychological trauma, gaining an appreciation for how patients cope with it is an important part of the comprehensive care of head and neck oncology patients.

Metastatic cervical carcinoma from an unknown primary: Literature review

May 7, 2014     Rodrigo Arrangoiz, MS, MD; Tom J. Galloway, MD; Pavlos Papavasiliou, MD; John A. Ridge, MD, PhD; Miriam N. Lango, MD
article

Abstract

Carcinoma of an unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors for which no primary site can be detected following a thorough history, physical examination, and noninvasive and invasive testing. CUP presenting with metastasis to the neck (metastatic cervical carcinoma from an unknown primary [MCCUP]) has been an enigma since von Volkmann first described it in 1882 as a cancer arising in a branchial cleft cyst. Genetic studies have shed some light on this unusual entity. In most cases, clinical features, imaging studies, and a meticulous assessment of the upper aerodigestive tract should assist in identifying the source of disease. Molecular testing of cytologic specimens for Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus (HPV) can facilitate identification of the primary site in the nasopharynx and oropharynx. At least 25% of MCCUPs are directly attributable to HPV-related malignancies, and this number can be expected to increase. Minimally invasive transoral mucosal sampling can identify an otherwise clinically and radiologically occult cancer. We performed a literature review with the objective of discussing the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, and management of MCCUP.

Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis)

May 7, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Appropriate management requires lifelong thyroid hormone replacement therapy, resulting in decreased thyroid antibody levels, although complications of therapy may be seen.

Massive pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland: Surgical considerations

May 7, 2014     Alex Fernandez, MS; Ryan F. Osborne, MD, FACS; Jason S. Hamilton, MD, FACS
article

Preservation of the facial nerve and its branches requires special consideration when dealing with a large parotid mass. The traditional approach of anterograde dissection of the facial nerve proves ineffective in patients with large lesions that effectively obstruct the field of view and origin of the nerve trunk

Postoperative shoulder function after different types of neck dissection in head and neck cancer

May 7, 2014     Adil Sheikh, MBBS; Hussain Shallwani, MBBS; Shehzad Ghaffar, FCPS, FRCS
article

Abstract

Reported complications of neck dissection surgery have included decreases in shoulder muscle power and range of motion, drooping shoulder, and shoulder pain. We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess postoperative shoulder function following three different types of neck dissection surgery that were performed at Aga Khan University Hospital and to determine how various treatment factors and patient characteristics affected postoperative shoulder function. Our study population included 70 patients-51 men and 19 women, aged 18 to 70 years (mean: 48.6 ± 11.6)-who had undergone a total of 92 neck dissections (22 patients underwent bilateral procedures). Patients were assessed by physical examination and questionnaire responses. The physical examination included objective assessments of shoulder muscle power against resistance, active range of motion, maximum possible forward flexion, the length of time needed to repeat active shoulder flexion 5 times, and shoulder abduction. The questionnaire covered shoulder mobility during activities of daily living, the results of physiotherapy (and exercise), postoperative radiation status, and shoulder pain. Of the 92 neck dissections, 17 were selective (18.5%), 64 were modified radical (69.6%), and 11 were radical (12.0%). We found that patients who had undergone a nerve-sparing procedure (i.e., selective neck dissection or a modified radical neck dissection) exhibited significantly better shoulder function than did patients who had undergone radical neck dissections (p < 0.01). In addition, increasing age (p < 0.001) and a history of diabetes (p = 0.003) were associated with worse shoulder function, and postoperative physiotherapy was associated with better shoulder function (p = 0.002). Neither sex, weight, the side of the neck operated on (left or right), the administration of postoperative radiation, the length of time between surgery and shoulder function assessment, comorbidities such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease, nor the status of the level V lymph nodes had any statistically significant association with shoulder function.

Parathyroid adenoma in a woman with secondary hyperparathyroidism

May 7, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MD, MPH; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
article

For surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, a common approach is the removal of three and one-half glands (subtotal parathyroidectomy), leaving the remaining half gland in place with an intact vascular pedicle. Alternatively, a total parathyroidectomy may be performed, and one-half of one gland may be minced and reimplanted into shallow pockets created in the sternocleidomastoid or brachioradialis muscles.

Endoscopic transnasal transsphenoidal approach for craniopharyngioma: Report of 6 cases

May 7, 2014     Chan-Soon Park, MD; Byung-Guk Kim, MD; Ji-Hyeon Shin, MD; Jin-Hee Cho, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate outcomes in patients with a craniopharyngioma who were managed via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Craniopharyngiomas exhibit histologically benign but “clinically malignant” features. Our study group was made up of 5 patients who underwent a total of 6 operations. The study population included 1 female and 5 males, aged 14 to 50 years (mean: 29.2). The overall rate of near-total tumor removal was 67%, but all patients eventually experienced a recurrence. Revision surgery to correct any severe postoperative complications was not required in any case. We found that the endoscopic transnasal transsphenoidal approach could be a safe and less invasive surgical option for the removal of craniopharyngiomas, although we were unable to remove all tumor or prevent recurrences.

Facial nerve palsy associated with a cystic lesion of the temporal bone

March 18, 2014     Na Hyun Kim, MD; Seung-Ho Shin, MD
article

Abstract

Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign, self-limiting inflammatory condition known as Bell palsy. However, there are other conditions that may cause facial paralysis, such as neoplastic conditions of the facial nerve, traumatic nerve injury, and temporal bone leions. We present a case of facial nerve palsy concurrent with a benign cystic lesion of the temporal bone, adjacent to the tympanic segment of the facial nerve. The patient's symptoms subsided after facial nerve decompression via a transmastoid approach.

Madelung disease: Multiple symmetric lipomatosis

March 18, 2014     Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Harold R. Neitzschman, MD, FACR; Jeremy Nguyen, MD
article

Patients with multiple symmetric lipomatosis commonly also suffer from various neuropathies, especially paresthesias and autonomic neuropathy.

Fungal necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in 3 patients with uncontrolled diabetes

March 18, 2014     Saravanam Prasanna Kumar, DNB; Arunachalam Ravikumar, MS; Lakshmanan Somu, MS
article

Abstract

Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive soft-tissue infection that is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. It is usually caused by bacteria and rarely caused by or complicated by a fungus. We report 3 cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. Fungi were isolated in all 3 cases. In 1 fatal case, the invasive zygomycete Apophysomyces elegans was isolated. Keys to the management of this condition are (1) early isolation of the causative organism by fungal smear and culture, (2) adequate control of diabetes, (3) maintenance of electrolyte balance, and (4) controlled aggressive surgical debridement at an early stage. We emphasize the importance of fungal smears and cultures in the management of this rapidly spreading infection.

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