Head and Neck

Thyroid gland follicular carcinoma

March 2, 2015     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

The recommended treatment is lobectomy or total thyroidectomy, with or without radioablation. The choice depends on the size and stage of the tumor, extent of lymphovascular invasion, and patient's age.

Protracted hypocalcemia following post-thyroidectomy lumbar rhabdomyolysis secondary to evolving hypoparathyroidism

March 2, 2015     Usman Y. Cheema, MD; Carrie N. Vogler, PharmD, BCPS; Joshua Thompson, PharmD; Stacy L. Sattovia, MD, FACP; Srikanth Vallurupalli, MD
article

Abstract

Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by skeletal muscle breakdown. It is a potential cause of serious electrolyte and metabolic disturbances, acute kidney insufficiency, and death. Recently, rhabdomyolysis has been increasingly recognized following certain surgical procedures. We discuss the case of a morbidly obese 51-year-old woman who developed postoperative rhabdomyolysis of the lumbar muscles following a prolonged thyroidectomy for a large goiter. We discuss how her morbid obesity, the supine surgical position, the duration of surgery (including prolonged exposure to anesthetic agents), and postoperative immobility contributed to the development of rhabdomyolysis. Immediately after surgery, the patient developed hypocalcemia, which was likely due to rhabdomyolysis since her serum parathyroid hormone level was normal. Later, however, persistent hypocalcemia despite resolution of the rhabdomyolysis raised a suspicion of iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism, which was confirmed by a suppressed parathyroid hormone level several days after surgery. In post-thyroidectomy patients with risk factors for rhabdomyolysis, maintaining a high degree of clinical suspicion and measuring serum creatine kinase and parathyroid hormone levels can allow for an accurate interpretation of hypocalcemia.

Multifocal inverted papillomas in the head and neck

March 2, 2015     Jyoti Sharma, MD; David Goldenberg, MD; Henry Crist, MD; Johnathan McGinn, MD
article

Abstract

Inverted papilloma is a rare benign neoplasm that usually originates in the lateral nasal wall. It can be a locally aggressive lesion and invade nearby structures. While primarily a nasal neoplasm, cases of an inverted papilloma involving the temporal bone, pharynx, nasopharynx, and lacrimal sac have been reported. We describe the case of a 67-year-old man with a history of nasal inverted papilloma who presented with a recurrent nasal mass and a large mass on the left side of his upper neck. The patient's history included inverted papillomas in multiple locations: the temporal bone, the sinonasal tract, and the nasopharynx. The new neck mass raised a concern for malignant degeneration and metastasis, but pathology demonstrated that it was a benign inverted papilloma. No clear etiology for the new neck lesion was evident except for an origin in salivary gland tissue. However, there was no physical connection between the neck mass and the submandibular gland identifiable on pathologic evaluation. This case illustrates the need for an aggressive primary resection to minimize local recurrence, as well as adequate surveillance to address recurrences early. Given the potential for multicentricity, patients with a typical sinonasal inverted papilloma should undergo a complete head and neck examination as part of their follow-up.

Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy

March 2, 2015     Bianca Alfonso, MD; Adam S. Jacobson, MD; Eran E. Alon, MD; Michael A. Via, MD
article

Abstract

Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended.

Common carotid artery dissection: A rare cause of acute neck swelling

March 2, 2015     Muhammad Adil Abbas Khan, MBBS, MRCS, DOHNS, FCPS(Plast); Alasdair Moffat, MBBS; Waseem Ahmed, MBBS, MRCS, DOHNS; Julian Wong, MBBS, FRCS(Vasc); Changez Jadun, MBBS, FRCR
article

Abstract

Spontaneous carotid artery dissection is a rare condition with potentially devastating consequences. Internal carotid artery and vertebral artery dissections have been implicated as the cause of 20% of strokes occurring in patients younger than 45 years. We describe a very rare case of a nontraumatic common carotid artery dissection in a 45-year-old man that was initially misdiagnosed as a sternocleidomastoid hematoma. This case highlights the need for vigilance for this often-missed diagnosis, as well as the indication for noninvasive imaging in unidentified neck swellings.

The efficacy of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis

February 2, 2015     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Shaun A. Nguyen, MD, MA, CPI; Joshua D. Farrar, MD; Eric J. Lentsch, MD
article

Abstract

We performed an extensive review of the literature to compare the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to surgical resection, the current standard of care, in the treatment of adults with early-stage (T1-2N0M0) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Since patients who receive PDT are chosen with a high degree of selectivity, particular care was taken when extracting data for comparison. For outcomes measures, PDT was assessed in terms of a complete response to therapy, and surgery was evaluated in terms of locoregional control. Recurrences were also analyzed. We found 24 studies-12 for each treatment-to compare for this meta-analysis. In comparing a complete response to PDT and locoregional control with surgery, we found no statistically significant difference (mean difference [MD]: 1.166; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.479 to 2.839). With respect to recurrences, again no statistically significant difference was observed (MD: 0.552; 95% CI: 0.206 to 1.477). We conclude that PDT is as effective as primary surgical resection for the treatment of early-stage SCC of the oral cavity and that it is a valid function-preserving approach to treatment.

Giant palatal pyogenic granuloma

February 2, 2015     Yu-Hsuan Lin, MD; Yaoh-Shiang Lin, MD
article

The differential diagnosis for a pyogenic granuloma should include hemangioma, bacillary angiomatosis, peripheral giant cell granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, and some malignancies, such as Kaposi sarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and achromic melanoma.

Group A beta streptococcal infections in children after oral or dental trauma: A case series of 5 patients

January 19, 2015     Brittany E. Goldberg, MD; Cecile G. Sulman, MD; Michael J. Chusid, MD
article

Abstract

Group A streptococcus (GAS) produces a variety of disease processes in children. Severe invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis can result. Traumatic dental injuries are common in the pediatric population, although the role of dental injuries in invasive GAS disease is not well characterized. In this article, we describe our retrospective series of 5 cases of GAS infection following oral or dental trauma in children.

Reconstructive and rehabilitation challenges following a cranio-orbital gunshot wound

January 19, 2015     Sachin S. Pawar, MD; John S. Rhee, MD, MPH; Timothy S. Wells, MD
article

Abstract

We present a case of a 26-year-old man who sustained a close-range gunshot wound to the head. His injuries included significant left orbital injury resulting in a ruptured, blind eye and severely comminuted fractures of the left orbital roof, superior and inferior orbital rims, and orbital floor. Associated injuries included left frontal lobe injury, anterior and posterior table fractures of the left frontal sinus, and a comminuted left zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture. We employed an interdisciplinary surgical approach with collaboration among the Otolaryngology, Neurosurgery, and Oculoplastic Surgery services performed in two stages. Management of such extensive craniofacial injuries can be challenging and requires a coordinated, interdisciplinary approach.

A case of myoepithelioma mimicking a parotid cyst

January 19, 2015     Haldun Onuralp Kamburoglu, MD, FEBOPRAS; Aycan U. Kayikcioglu, MD; Cigdem Himmetoglu, MD
article

Abstract

Myoepithelioma is an uncommon tumor of the myoepithelial cells that is considered to represent a distinct category of tumor by the World Health Organization. It accounts for less than 1% of all tumors that develop in the salivary glands. We describe the case of a 35-year-old woman who presented to us with a painless swelling on the right side of her face. She was diagnosed with a parotid gland cyst by ultrasonography and computed tomography. Following excision of the mass, however, the pathology report identified the tumor as a solid myoepithelioma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a myoepithelioma that exhibited cystic features on radiologic examination even though it had a solid architecture. We also discuss the preoperative diagnostic aspects of the myoepitheliomas.

Arrested development: Lingual thyroid gland

January 19, 2015     Mark R. Williams, MRCS(ENT); Vivek Kaushik, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
article

Most patients with lingual thyroid are asymptomatic and are diagnosed incidentally following a radiologic investigation for another condition of the head and neck.

Unusual presentation of a midline neck mass

January 19, 2015     Yann-Fuu Kou, MD; Gopi Shah, MD, MPH; Ronald Mitchell, MD; Larry L. Myers, MD
article

Venous malformations are usually visible at birth, although deeper lesions may have normal overlying skin or a bluish discoloration. They grow proportionately with the child and can expand in adulthood.

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