Turbinate

Office CO2 laser turbinoplasty

June 30, 2008     Gordon J. Siegel, MD, Kristin A. Seiberling, MD, Kenneth G. Haines, MD, Kenneth G. Haines, MD, and Allison S. Aguado, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a prospective study of office carbon dioxide (CO2) laser turbinoplasty as a treatment for symptoms related to turbinate dysfunction in 58 patients. All patients completed surveys before and 1 month after treatment, and 23 patients completed longer-term follow-up surveys 8 to 24 months postoperatively. The 1-month postoperative assessments demonstrated a trend toward symptom improvement, as many patients reported a decrease in their use of pretreatment medications. Long-term benefit was achieved in 70% of patients. Ten patients underwent pre- and post-treatment biopsies, and histologic evaluation demonstrated minimal tissue alteration following treatment, alleviating concerns of physiological and functional compromise. We conclude that office-based CO2 laser turbinoplasty is a useful tool for the treatment of disorders related to turbinate dysfunction. We describe one clinician's method of performing office CO2 laser turbinoplasty, and we report his experience and findings.

Endoscopic view of a septated concha bullosa

February 1, 2008     Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Dewey A. Christmas, MD
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Unilateral inferior turbinate hypoplasia caused by a longstanding (approximately 35 yr) nasal foreign body

January 1, 2008     Fiorenza Derosas, MD, Gino Marioni, MD, Brescia Giuseppe, MD, Alessandra Florio, MD, Claudia Staffieri, MD, and Alberto Staffieri, MD
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Abstract

We report the unusual case of a 44-year-old man who presented with a plastic foreign body that had been lodged in his right nasal cavity for approximately 35 years. Initial attempts to remove the object were unsuccessful; only after it was broken into several parts was removal achieved. Rigid nasal endoscopy and computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the ipsilateral inferior turbinate.

Unilateral inferior turbinate agenesis: A case report

January 1, 2008     Fatma Çaylakli, MD, Ismail Yilmaz, MD, Cem Hürcan, MD, Cem Özer, MD, and Levent Özlüoĝlu, MD
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Abstract

Many common anatomic variations in the nasal cavity have been observed, including paradoxical turbinates and pneumatization of the inferior, middle, and superior turbinates. We describe a case of a rare anomaly—unilateral inferior turbinate agenesis—in a 65-year-old man who had presented with epistaxis. During evaluation, anterior rhinoscopic examination revealed the absence of the right inferior turbinate; this finding was confirmed on computed tomography. The patient had never undergone nasal or sinus surgery, and he denied ever having expelled anything of significance from his nasal cavity. This case merits attention because of the rarity of reports on turbinate agenesis.

Endoscopic view of a hyperpneumatized agger nasi cell resembling a nasal turbinate

December 1, 2007     Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Dewey A. Christmas, MD
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Endoscopic view of sinonasal cancer 6 years post-treatment

October 31, 2007     Dewey A. Christmas Jr., MD, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Dislocation of the turbinate: A rare complication of middle turbinate surgery

May 31, 2007     Hisham S. Khalil, MD, FRCS (ORL-HNS); Arash H. Naraghi, MRCS; Desmond A. Nunez, MD, FRCS (ORL)
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Endoscopic view of a powered partial resection of a concha bullosa

March 1, 2007     Dewey A. Christmas, Jr., MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, MBA; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Epistaxis caused by hemangioma of the inferior turbinate

September 30, 2006     Joseph P. Mirante, MD; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD
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Endoscopic view of the ethmoid strut

June 30, 2006     Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD
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Inferior turbinate schwannoma: Report of a case

May 31, 2006     Riad Khnifies, MD; Milo Fradis, MD; Alexander Brodsky, MD; Jacob Bajar, MD; Michal Luntz, MD
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Abstract
Schwannomas of the nasal cavity are extremely rare. We evaluated a 42-year-old woman who presented with a 4-year history of slowly progressive nasal obstruction. The cause of the obstruction was identified as a schwannoma in the left inferior turbinate. The tumor was completely excised, and no sign of recurrence was evident at the 1-year follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third case of a schwannoma originating in the inferior nasal turbinate that has been reported in the English-language literature. We review the clinical and pathologic features of this case.

Partial middle turbinectomy by nasotracheal intubation

May 31, 2006     Shalini Patiar, MRCS; Eu Chin Ho, MRCS; Rory C.D. Herdman, FRCS
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Abstract
Partial middle turbinate avulsion is a rare complication of nasotracheal intubation. Patients usually experience a brisk hemorrhage at the time of injury. Postoperatively, some patients develop a unilateral nasal obstruction, while others are asymptomatic. We present an unusual case in which a patient became symptomatic many years after the incident. We hope to raise awareness that a traumatic disruption of the turbinates secondary to nasotracheal intubation might lead to the development of an abnormal nasopharyngeal mass.
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