Turbinate

Endoscopic view of an ostium in a concha bullosa of the superior turbinate

October 17, 2014     Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS
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A specific outflow tract or ostium of the superior turbinate, as was seen in this case, has been infrequently described or imaged.

Nasal vestibule schwannoma: Report of a rare case

June 8, 2014     Ismail Fadzilah, MSurg(ORL-HNS); Husain Salina, MSurg(ORL-HNS); Baharudin Khairuzzana, MSurg(ORL-HNS); Omar Rahmat, MSurg(ORL-HNS); SHA Primuharsa Putra, MSurg(ORL-HNS)
article

Abstract

Schwannomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are quite rare, especially in the nasal vestibule. We report the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with a 2-month history of progressively worsening right-sided epistaxis and nasal blockage. Rigid nasoendoscopy showed a mobile, smooth, globular mass occupying the right nasal vestibule. The mass arose from the lateral nasal wall and impinged on the anterior part of the middle turbinate posteriorly. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses showed a 3.8 x 1.7-cm enhancing mass in the right nostril. The mass obliterated the nasal cavity and caused mild deviation of the septum. The preoperative histopathologic examination showed positivity for vimentin and S-100 protein, suggesting a diagnosis of schwannoma. The patient underwent an intranasal laser-assisted excision biopsy. The histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and no recurrence was seen in the follow-up period.

Endoscopic view of a concha bullosa of the inferior nasal turbinate

May 7, 2014     Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Pneumatization of the inferior turbinate, or concha bullosa of the inferior turbinate, is clinically significant when it causes persistent nasal airway obstruction.

Endoscopic view of a biodegradable middle meatal spacer

January 21, 2014     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Middle meatal spacers have included simple packing of the middle meatus for several days in the postoperative period, as well as insertion of various preformed splints.

Concha bullosa mucocele and mucopyocele: A series of 4 cases

January 21, 2014     Khalid H. Al-Sebeih, MD, FRCSC, FACS; Mohd H. Bu-Abbas, MD
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Abstract

Concha bullosa is an aerated turbinate in the nose. It is a common anatomic variant that can develop a mucocele if obstructed, which can further progress to become a mucopyocele if infected. A mucopyocele can expand and cause destruction of neighboring tissues. A review of the literature revealed only 10 cases previously reported. We describe 2 cases of mucocele and 2 cases of mucopyocele.

Nasal actinomycosis mimicking a foreign body

July 21, 2013     Dimitrios Batzakakis, MD; Petros D. Karkos, AFRCS, MPhil, PhD; Sotirios Papouliakos, MD; Samuel C. Leong, MRCS, DO-HNS; Ioannis Bardanis, MD
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Abstract

Nasal actinomycosis is a rare disease. We present a case of nasal actinomycosis causing symptoms similar to those of a nasal foreign body. A 34-year-old woman presented with a long history of halitosis and unilateral offensive, purulent rhinorrhea. Rigid nasendoscopy showed a hard, dark gray mass between the middle and inferior turbinates. Computed tomography findings were typical of a nasal foreign body. Endoscopic removal of the mass was performed, and histopathology established a diagnosis of actinomycosis. We suggest that every clinician confronted with unilateral nasal symptoms and/or signs should have this clinical entity in mind, since it has justifiably been characterized as the head and neck “mimic.”

Aneurysmal bone cyst in the middle turbinate: A case report

June 11, 2013     Gokce Simsek, MD; Cem Saka, MD; Didem N. Sonbay, MD; Istemihan Akin, MD; and Fulya Koybasioglu, MD
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Abstract

Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign and locally destructive bone lesion usually seen in the younger population. Its etiology is unknown. Its yearly incidence rate has been reported to be 0.14/100,000, comprising 1% of all bone tumors. It may develop primarily or arise from primary bone tumors. Hemorrhagic fluid content with a septated appearance is the characteristic feature of aneurysmal bone cyst. It is most commonly seen in the metaphysis of the long bones. In rare cases, the cyst is located in the skull. Primary treatment is surgical excision, and the recurrence rate after treatment is 10 to 30%. Based on a review of the current literature, there have been no previous reports of aneurysmal bone cyst located in the middle turbinate. We report a case of aneurysmal bone cyst with an atypical location and discuss the treatment of the patient with endoscopic surgery in light of relevant literature.

Giant osteoma of the middle turbinate: A case report

April 17, 2013     Samar Pal Singh Yadav, MS(ORL); Joginder Singh Gulia, MS(ORL); Anita Hooda, MDS(Prosthodontics); Ajoy Kumar Khaowas, MS
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Abstract

Osteoma of the nose is a slowly developing benign tumor with a reported incidence of 0.6% of all the osteomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses. It is asymptomatic in initial stages and is usually diagnosed when it causes nasal obstruction. Osteoma arising from the middle turbinate is very rare and only two cases have been previously reported. We report a giant middle turbinate measuring 36 x 35 x 20 mm which, to the best of our knowledge, is the largest reported osteoma arising from the middle turbinate.

Primary meningioma of the middle turbinate: A case report

October 4, 2012     Pradipta K. Parida, MS, DNB; Ramandeep Singh Virk, MS;
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Abstract

Meningioma of the sinonasal tract is a rare entity. Meningioma of the nose and paranasal sinuses may occur in one of two ways: (1) by secondary extension of a primary tumor in the cranial cavity or orbit or (2) primarily in the nose and paranasal sinuses de novo from the ectopic meningocytes derived from pluripotent mesenchymal cells. Primary sinonasal meningiomas are often difficult to diagnose because of their infrequent occurrence. The final diagnosis rests on the histologic examination. We report what is to our knowledge the first case of primary meningioma of the middle turbinate.

Endoscopic view of compensatory hypertrophy of the middle turbinate

June 4, 2012     Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Compensatory hypertrophy of the middle turbinate can occur when a patient's nasal septum is markedly deflected to one side, enlarging the airway and hence giving the middle turbinate an unusually large space in which to expand.

A concha bullosa mucopyocele manifesting as migraine headaches: A case report and literature review

April 30, 2012     Rabia Shihada, MD; Michal Luntz, MD
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Abstract

A concha bullosa is a common anatomic variant that represents an aerated turbinate, usually the middle turbinate. It is usually asymptomatic. When extensively pneumatized, a large concha bullosa may cause significant problems, including headache, nasal obstruction, and blockage of sinus drainage. We report a case of a large concha bullosa mucopyocele that manifested as recurring migraine headaches. It was successfully treated with surgical excision. We also review the available literature.

Arteriovenous hemangioma formation following radiofrequency ablation for inferior turbinate reduction

October 26, 2011     Senol Polat, MD, Hasan Murat Tanyeri, MD, and Selcuk Bilgi, MD
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Abstract

Inferior turbinate reduction by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been recommended as an easy and safe option for the treatment of patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy. Complications of this type of excision are generally acceptable. We describe a case of RFA turbinate reduction that resulted in an unusual complication: the formation of an arteriovenous hemangioma.

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