Frontal Sinus

Focal hyperostosis of an intranasal inverted papilloma observed on computed tomography

September 17, 2014     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD; Ha-Min Jeong, MD
article

Precise preoperative identification of the tumor origin is as important as detecting the extent of tumor invasion.

Endoscopic modified Lothrop approach for the excision of bilateral frontal sinus tumors

March 18, 2014     Jiun Fong Thong, MRCS; Deyali Chatterjee, MD; Siew Yoong Hwang, FRCS
article

Abstract

We describe the use of an endoscopic modified Lothrop approach for clearance of an extensive sinonasal-type hemangiopericytoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses with bilateral frontal sinus involvement in a 44-year-old woman. The modified Lothrop approach is conventionally used to treat sinusitis, but with some slight modifications to the technique, it can also be used for tumor excision.

Glass in the frontal sinus: 28-year delayed presentation

October 23, 2013     Alice K. Guidera, MBChB, BSc; Peter M. Dixon, MBBS, FRCS; Hans R. Stegehuis, MBChB, FRACS
article

Abstract

Reports of delayed presentation of foreign bodies in the frontal sinus are infrequent and likely to become rarer with the widespread availability of computed tomography in the last 2 decades. We present a case in which glass from a road traffic injury was found in the frontal sinus, causing symptoms of frontal sinusitis 28 years after the initial injury. We also present a review of the literature.

Endoscopic closure of a frontocutaneous fistula

October 23, 2013     Alexandros Tsikoudas, DLO, FRCS(Otol), FRCS(ORL-HNS); Christos Georgalas, PhD, MRCS, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
article

Abstract

A frontocutaneous fistula is a rare sequela of frontal sinus pathology. Management via an endoscopic approach is not frequently reported in the literature. We describe such an approach with the aid of still photography and imaging plus videoendoscopy, and we discuss the current literature.

Pott puffy tumor in a 5-year-old girl with frontal sinusitis

February 25, 2013     Tanya Rogo, MD, FIDSA; Richard H. Schwartz, MD, FAAP
article

Abstract

We describe the case of a 5-year-old girl with a Pott puffy tumor on her forehead. Computed tomography confirmed frontal sinusitis and an epidural abscess. This case is unusual in that the patient's age at presentation was younger than the age when the frontal sinuses are believed to develop.

Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the sinonasal region: Three case reports with a review of the literature

October 31, 2012     Pradipta Kumar Parida, MS, DNB, MNAMS
article

Abstract

The paranasal sinuses are a rare location for metastases. The most frequent infraclavicular primary tumor to metastasize to the nose and paranasal sinuses is renal cell carcinoma. Three cases of bilateral renal cell carcinoma with metastases to the paranasal sinuses and with destruction of the skull base are reported. These patients had a primary renal cell carcinoma on the left side for which they had undergone a left nephrectomy many years previously. Right-sided renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed only after the patients had developed symptoms secondary to their metastases. These patients presented with the unusual manifestations of frontal swelling, proptosis, and epistaxis. They were offered palliative treatment in the form of radiotherapy and interferon therapy.

Paranasal sinus mucocele

July 5, 2012     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Radiographic findings are essential to the diagnosis of paranasal sinus mucocele. Usually opacification of the sinus with thinning, erosion, or destruction of the sinus wall are seen.

Spectrum of paranasal sinus mycoses in coastal India

June 4, 2012     Jyoti R. Kini, MD; Spoorthy S. Shetty, MBBS; Hema Kini, MD
article

Abstract

Fungal infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses are uncommon, and the disease they cause can be identified from their histopathologic appearance. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of fungal infection and histopathologic changes in specimens sent for evaluation of chronic sinusitis and correlate with culture findings wherever possible. The records of 200 consecutive cases coded as paranasal sinuses over a period of 3 years were retrieved from the Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India. Twenty nine out of a total of 200 specimens (14.5%) were positive for fungal elements on histopathologic examination. The most common etiologic agents in our study were Aspergillus spp (37.9%); only 1 culture (3.4%) was positive for a Candida species. Eight of 29 patients with fungal sinusitis (27.6%) had diabetes, and 1 patient was being treated for rheumatoid arthritis. Eight of the 29 patients had allergic fungal sinusitis, 8 had chronic granulomatous sinusitis, and 1 had acute fulminant invasive sinusitis. Fungi have been increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in chronic sinusitis. It is imperative for patient management not only that paranasal sinus mycoses be diagnosed but also that the specific histologic category be identified.

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the nose and paranasal sinuses masquerading as a malignancy

April 30, 2012     Mohamed Amin, MD, FRCSI; Rohana Ali, AFRCS; Susan Kennedy, MD; Conrad Timon, MD, FRCSI
article

Abstract

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the nose and paranasal sinuses is a rare entity that exhibits a diverse histologic pattern that can mimic malignant tumors clinically and radiologically. We present a case of IMT in an 88-year-old man who presented with an aggressive tumor-like lesion in the nose and paranasal sinuses that had a malignant appearance on radiology. We discuss this tumor's clinicoradiologic resemblance to a malignancy, and we review the treatment options following careful histologic and immunohistochemical analysis.

Frontal infundibular cells: Pathway to the frontal sinus

March 1, 2012     Ozum Tuncyurek, MD, Murat Songu, MD, Zehra Hilal Adibelli, MD, and Kazim Onal, MD
article

Abstract

A frontal infundibular cell (FIC) is an uncommon anatomic variant of an anterior ethmoid pneumatization that originates from the frontal recess and typically extends into the lumen of the frontal sinus ostium. FICs may show several anatomic variants that impact the anatomy of the frontal recess. Familiarity with these variants is required for safe endoscopic sinus surgical procedures. We conducted a retrospective chart review, examining 1,040 frontal recesses in 520 adults with no frontal sinus disease, to explore the anatomy of the healthy frontal recess and to describe the prevalence of FICs in patients without a history of conditions that cause frontal pneumatization. Review of axial and coronal computed tomography data, which were reformatted for sagittal reconstruction, was performed at a computer workstation. Bent and Kuhn's classification was used to define types of FICs. We identified 167 patients (32.1%) as having unilateral or bilateral FICs. Type I infundibular cells were the most common type (found in 15.7% of the entire study population). Type II and type III FICs were found in 3.8% and 12.1%, respectively; type IV FICs were present in 0.4%. The FIC has not been emphasized as an important potential cause of frontal sinus obstruction in the radiology literature, but clinicians should specifically watch for it on all routine computed tomography of the frontal sinus. Fine-cut computed tomography scans aid in the identification of each individual cell and allow the surgeon to formulate a clear and precise surgical plan. A surgical plan with a thorough understanding of the anatomy enables confident dissection of this complex and difficult area.

Endoscopic view of a frontal recess obstruction causing frontal sinusitis

February 18, 2012     Dewey A. Christmas, MD, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

Sphenopalatine artery pseudoaneurysm after endoscopic sinus surgery: A case report and literature review

February 18, 2012     Raewyn G. Campbell, BMed(Hons), BApplSci(Physio)
article

Abstract

Previously reported cases of iatrogenic sphenopalatine artery (SPA) pseudoaneurysm have occurred only after trans-sphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumors or maxillofacial surgery. In this article, the author presents what to the best of her knowledge is the first reported case of an SPA pseudoaneurysm that developed following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). The patient was a 76-year-old woman with myelodysplastic syndrome who presented with a 6-month history of unilateral sinus symptoms. She underwent septoplasty and unilateral ESS, which included frontal recess clearance and sphenoidotomy. However, during surgery, severe generalized bleeding was encountered. The bleeding was arrested only after anterior and posterior nasal packing. After two attempts to remove the packing failed, angiography was obtained. It revealed an SPA pseudoaneurysm, which was immediately and successfully embolized. SPA pseudoaneurysm is a rare but significant complication of ESS, and it should be considered in patients with posterior epistaxis after ESS or prolonged posterior nasal packing. The pathogenesis may include intraoperative trauma, infection, pressure necrosis from packing, or a combination of these factors. Optimal management includes either ligation or embolization, depending on anatomic, patient, staff, and resource factors. The author reviews the pertinent anatomy and the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and prevention of this rare complication.

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