Concha

Angiomatous ethmoidochoanal polyp in an infant: Case report

November 22, 2011     Nuno Oliveira, MD, Nuno Trigueiros, MD, Delfim Duarte, MD, and Manuel Rodrigues eRodrigues, MD
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Abstract

Nasal polyps are rare in children younger than 10 years. We describe the case of an infant girl who had undergone a traumatic intubation at birth that had resulted in nasal bleeding. At the age of 5 months, she was brought to us with an obstructive left nasal mass. Imaging revealed the presence of an ethmoidochoanal polyp, as well as a fracture of the posterior cribriform plate and a small associated meningocele. Four months later, the polyp was excised, and the meningocele was corrected with endoscopic nasal surgery. Pathologic evaluation identified the lesion as an angiomatous polyp, which was probably related to the previous traumatic episode. We discuss the clinical aspects of a pathologic entity that has not been previously reported in an infant.

Endoscopic view of multiple ostia of bilateral conchae bullosa

December 17, 2010     Dewey A. Christmas, MD, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Endoscopic view of a longitudinal cleft concha bullosa

September 30, 2010     Dewey A. Christmas, MD, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Endoscopic view of sinonasal cancer 6 years post-treatment

October 31, 2007     Dewey A. Christmas Jr., MD, Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS, and Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Endoscopic view of an infected concha bullosa

March 31, 2007     Dewey A. Christmas Jr., MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
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Bilateral massive conchae bullosa mimicking intranasal tumors

July 31, 2005     Hüsamettin Yasar, MD; Aysegül Verim, MD; Haluk Özkul, MD
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Abstract
We describe a case of bilateral massive conchae bullosa in a 76-year-old woman. She presented with a 2-year history of nasal obstruction and frontal headache. In light of these and other findings on anterior rhinoscopic and endoscopic examinations, we initially suspected nasal tumors. However, after a prebiopsy evaluation by computed tomography, we diagnosed bilateral massive conchae bullosa that did not impair sinus ventilation. Endoscopic surgery was performed, and the patient's symptoms abated.