Auditory Canal

Amyloidosis of the external auditory canal and middle ear: Unusual ear tumor

February 1, 2007     Heitham Gheriani, FRCSI, FRCSEd; Rajesh Tewary, MD, FRCSEd; Timothy J. O'Sullivan, FRCS(C)
article
 

Multiple angiomas of the external auditory canal in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome

January 1, 2007     Matthew E. Dahl, MD; Marcella Bothwell, MD; Scot D. Hirschi, MD
article

Cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal in an immunocompromised patient

September 30, 2006     Arun K. Gadre, MD; Jennifer Davies, MD
article

Role of impacted cerumen in hearing loss

September 30, 2006     Sethu T. Subha, MS (ORL); Rajagopalan Raman, MS (ORL)
article
Abstract
We performed a study to determine if cerumen in the ear canal causes significant hearing loss and to ascertain if there is any correlation between the amount of cerumen and the degree of hearing loss. Our study was conducted on 109 ears in 80 patients. The results indicated that impacted cerumen does cause a significant degree of conductive hearing loss. We found no significant correlation between the length of the cerumen plug and the severity of hearing loss. Nor did we find any significant correlation between the presence of impacted cerumen and variables such as age, sex, ethnicity, or affected side.

Primary B cell lymphoma of the external auditory canal

August 31, 2006     Sheldon P. Hersh, MD; Winston G. Harrison, MD; David J. Hersh, MD
article
Abstract
Temporal bone lymphomas are rare and typically metastatic neoplasms. We describe a case of primary B cell lymphoma that originated in the external auditory canal of an elderly woman. The diagnosis was based on histopathologic examination supplemented by immunophenotypic analysis. The patient was treated with external-beam radiation and remained disease-free throughout 9 years of follow-up. We also point out that the presence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in an unusual site may be an indication that the patient has an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

An unusual 'disappearing mass' in the ear canal

June 30, 2006     Eu Chin Ho, MRCS, DOHNS; Naeem Siddiqui, DLO, FRCS (ORL-HNS)
article

Reconstruction of the conchal bowl and external auditory canal

June 30, 2006     Suma Susan Mathews, DLO, MS; Shiby Ninan, MS, Mch
article

Exostosis of the external auditory canal

March 1, 2006     J. Walter Kutz, Jr., MD; Jose N. Fayad, MD
article

An unusual site of a CSF leak following resection of a retrosigmoid acoustic neuroma

March 1, 2006     Michael P. Ondik, MD; Aaron G. Benson, MD; Hamid Djalilian, MD
article
Abstract
Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks may occur after acoustic neuroma resection. These leaks are usually the result of an iatrogenic injury during removal. The retrosigmoid approach is commonly associated with leaks that occur through the lateral end of the internal auditory canal, through the perilabyrinthine cells extending to the region of the internal auditory canal, or through the retrosigmoid air cells. We describe a case of an infracochlear CSF leak that developed following the retrosigmoid resection of an acoustic neuroma. To the best of our knowledge, this leak was unique for both its location and etiology.

Safety and efficacy of Sofenz ceruminolytic solution

February 1, 2006     Aiman Midani, MD; Inez Carels, MS; Michael Marks, PhD; Michael Wall, PhD; Ear Wax Removal Solution Study Team
article
Abstract
We conducted an open-label study of 109 untreated patients who had excessive or impacted cerumen. Our goal was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Sofenz Cerumenolytic Solution, a methyltrypsin-containing earwax removal solution. Each patient's external auditory canal was filled with Sofenz for 15 minutes. The primary measure of efficacy ''visibility of the tympanic membrane'' was assessed after the solution had been drained from the canal and again after the canal had been irrigated with lukewarm water. If the tympanic membrane was not completely visible following either application, the procedure was repeated. A safety examination was conducted 1 to 3 days after treatment. Secondary outcomes measures included relief of otologic symptoms (e.g., hearing loss, tinnitus, etc.) and patients' overall satisfaction with treatment. Immediately after treatment, we found that the external auditory canal was completely visible in 81 patients (74.3%) after 1 application of Sofenz and subsequent irrigation, and in 98 patients (89.9%) after 2 applications of each. At the safety follow-up visit, we determined that the number of otologic symptoms had declined by 93.2%. A self-reported assessment completed by each patient following the procedure revealed a high degree of satisfaction with treatment. A total of 58 adverse events were reported, but only 16 were directly related to treatment, and all were transient and either mild or moderate. We conclude that 1 or 2 applications of Sofenz followed by irrigation with lukewarm water is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment for excessive or impacted cerumen in the external auditory canal.

Complete medial canal fibrosis

January 1, 2006     S. Arif Ulubil, MD; Adrien A. Eshraghi, MD
article

Atypical presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis and a retropharyngeal neck abscess

January 1, 2006     Frank O. Agada, FRCS; Ravi Sharma, FRCS; Zvoru G.G. Makura, FRCS
article
Abstract
A 70-year-old Asian man with noninsulin-dependent diabetes presented with a 4-month history of left-sided otitis externa and right-sided facial palsy. Physical examination of the left ear revealed a punched-out ulcerative lesion on the tragus, an edematous and inflamed external auditory canal, and a purulent nonmucoid discharge. Computed tomography of the brain and neck demonstrated a large retropharyngeal abscess, an abscess in the left parapharyngeal space, and a small collection adjacent to the right carotid sheath at the level of C4; the cervical vertebrae and lungs were normal. Microscopy of drained pus and histology of left ear and neck node biopsies identified tuberculosis. The patient was started on antituberculosis drug therapy, but he died within 2 weeks of treatment. We discuss the characteristics of this unusual presentation of tuberculosis infection.
PreviousPage
of 6Next