Auditory Canal

Basal cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal

October 17, 2014     Nai-Wei Hsueh, MD; Min-Tsan Shu, MD
article

Basal cell carcinomas of the EAC are known to be locally aggressive, although they are not associated with regional lymph node metastasis.

Primary malignant melanoma of the external auditory canal extending into the preauricular area and scalp

October 17, 2014     Mainak Dutta, MS; Soumya Ghatak, MS; Ramanuj Sinha, MS, DNB
article

Abstract

Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are uncommon. When they do occur, they usually represent a metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases of primary malignant melanoma of the external auditory canal have been previously reported in the English-language literature since 1954. We describe a new case, which occurred in a 72-year-old woman who presented with a large, lobulated, pigmented mass with ulcerated bleeding on its surface. The patient was scheduled for surgery, but during preoperative preparations she developed signs of rapid dissemination and metastases to the liver and lungs, and she died of multiple organ failure within 3 weeks of presentation. Apart from the rarity of malignant melanoma of the external auditory canal, this case included other extraordinary features that make it noteworthy. Our experience with this case underscores the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment for patients with this potentially fatal malignancy.

Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath in the external auditory canal

October 17, 2014     Margherita Trani, MD; Massimo Zanni, MD; Paolo Gambelli, MD
article

Abstract

Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) and pigmented villonodular synovitis belong to the same type of benign proliferative lesions originating in the synovia that usually affect the joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. They frequently involve the hands, knees, ankles, and feet. We report a case of GCTTS in the external auditory canal in a 53-year-old woman who presented with hearing loss, fullness, and a sessile lesion protruding from the anterior wall of her external ear canal. The 1.5-cm diameter mass was spherical, well encapsulated, firm, and covered with normal skin. The lesion was completely excised, and the patient's symptoms resolved. No recurrence was detected at 2 years of follow-up.

Bilateral external auditory canal cholesteatomas

March 18, 2014     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
article

External auditory canal cholesteatomas may be classified as idiopathic or secondarily acquired, most commonly occurring in postoperative or post-traumatic settings.

Case report: Dermal inclusion cyst of the external auditory canal

December 20, 2013     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Jonathan S. Kulbersh, MD; Paul R. Lambert, MD
article

Abstract

Dermal inclusion cysts are benign masses that arise as the result of the entrapment of ectodermal components during embryogenesis. Their presenting symptoms are a direct result of the mass effect of the growing cyst. We describe the case of a 23-month-old girl who presented with a single, large dermal inclusion cyst in the external auditory canal. Our review of the literature revealed that only 2 other cases of a dermal inclusion cyst in this location have been previously reported.

Medial canal fibrosis

September 18, 2013     Joseph A. Ursick, MD; John W. House, MD
article

Medial canal fibrosis is an uncommon condition characterized by progressive stenosis of the bony external auditory canal.

Ganglion cyst in the external auditory canal

August 21, 2013     Chi-Kyou Lee, MD; Mee-Hye Oh, MD; and Kye Hoon Park, MD
article

In rare instances, ganglion cysts of the TMJ can pre-sent as a mass of the EAC, sometimes without obvious communication with the glenoid fossa.

Thiersch skin grafting in otologic surgery

August 21, 2013     Helen Xu, MD; Natasha Pollak, MD, MS; and Michael M. Paparella, MD
article

Abstract

Thiersch skin grafting is an old but highly effective surgical technique in otology. We frequently place a Thiersch graft after otologic procedures that either create a mastoid cavity or result in reduced skin coverage of a portion of the external auditory canal. The purpose of this article is to introduce this surgical technique to a new generation of otologists. We discuss its indications, the surgical technique, tips for a successful outcome, and postoperative care. A key to successful skin grafting is to perform the procedure about 10 days after the primary procedure to allow sufficient time for the formation of an adequate vascular bed at the recipient site. The goal in all cases is to achieve a safe, dry ear that is covered with keratinizing squamous epithelium. Thiersch grafting accomplishes this very well.

Large osteoma of the external auditory canal

July 21, 2013     Takashi Iizuka, MD; Takuo Haruyama, MD; Keiko Nagaya, MD
article

Cicatricial external auditory canal stenosis caused by ectodermal dysplasia: Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome

June 11, 2013     Amanda B. Sosulski, MD and James D. Hayes, MD
article

Abstract

We present a case of recurrent cicatricial stenosis of the external ear canals caused by ectodermal dysplasia, specifically Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome, in a 45-year-old woman. No form of medical or surgical management has produced durable patency of the patient's ear canals, and her hearing loss is being managed with hearing aids. Topical management of the recurring external otitis slows the process but has been unsuccessful in preventing restenosis of both external auditory canals.

Cavernous hemangioma of the external auditory canal

April 17, 2013     Min-Tsan Shu, MD; Kang-Chao Wu, MD; Yu-Chun Chen, MD
article

The differential diagnosisfor cavernous hemangioma of the external auditory canal includes attic cholesteatoma with aural polyp, glomus tumor, arteriovenous malformation, granulation tissue, and carcinoma of the EAC.

Large bilateral internal auditory meatus associated with bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence

January 24, 2013     Leonardo Manzari, MD; Paola Scagnelli, MD
article

Abstract

Superior semicircular canal dehiscence and an abnormally wide internal auditory meatus are clinical entities characterized by vestibular and cochlear symptoms. These symptoms are induced by hypersensitivity of labyrinthine receptors secondary to a bone defect of the otic capsule. We report the case of a 41-year-old man with congenital right-sided hearing loss who presented with bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence that was associated with wide, bulbous internal auditory meatus and a loss of the bony wall separating the lateral end of the meatus from the cochlea. The patient was experiencing vestibular and cochlear symptoms in the right ear and disabling tinnitus in the left ear. However, he refused all treatment and was lost to follow-up.

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