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Auditory Canal

An unusual cause of tinnitus

September 19, 2016  |  Po-Jun Chen, MD; Hsin-Chien Chen, MD, PhD

Live insects found in the outer ear canal should be immobilized or killed before removal.

Case of a tick as an unusual animate aural foreign body

June 14, 2016  |  Chao-Hsun Huang, MD; Min-Tsan Shu, MD

The risk of acquiring a tick foreign body in the external auditory canal is generally related to geographic and climatic factors, such as warmer months and areas with forests, high grass, and leaf litter.

External auditory canal stenting with nonlatex glove and Gelfoam

February 24, 2016  |  Judy C. Pan, MD; Tucker M. Harris, MD


External auditory canal stenosis, although uncommon, is a condition that is sometimes encountered by otolaryngologists. This condition has been shown to result from inflammatory changes that may be incited by many different causes. Various methods of stenting the canal open...

Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving the external auditory canal: An unusual ear tumor

October 31, 2015  |  Kang-Wei Fan, MD; Cheng-Chien Yang, MD; Chia-I Chou, MD; Min-Tsan Shu, MD

Langerhans cell histiocytosis has an unpredictable natural history, which ranges from rapidly fatal progressive disease to spontaneous resolution.

Internal auditory canal osteoma: Case report and review of the literature

June 5, 2015  |  Sharon Ovnat Tamir, MD; Francoise Cyna-Gorse, MD; Olivier Sterkers, MD


We report a case of internal auditory canal osteoma and discuss this entity's etiology, natural history, and treatment options. The internal auditory canal osteoma is a rare entity with only a few reports published in the medical literature. Its diagnosis is based on two...

Chronic discharging ear and multiple cranial nerve pareses: A sinister liaison

April 28, 2015  |  Mainak Dutta, MS; Dipankar Mukherjee, MS; Subrata Mukhopadhyay, MS

SCC of the temporal bone might well represent the extreme of the “inflammation-metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma” sequence, with chronic otitis media representing the inflammation.

Malignant otitis externa

April 28, 2015  |  Christina H. Fang, BS; James Sun, BS; Robert W. Jyung, MD

The advent of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics has significantly reduced the mortality of malignant otitis externa.

Contralateral hearing loss after vestibular schwannoma excision: A rare complication of neurotologic surgery

January 19, 2015  |  Robert H. Deeb, MD; Jack P. Rock, MD; Michael D. Seidman, MD, FACS


We report a rare case of contralateral hearing loss after vestibular schwannoma excision in a 48-year-old man who underwent surgery via a suboccipital approach for removal of a nearly 2-cm lesion involving the right cerebellopontine angle. Postoperatively, the patient awoke...

Primary malignant melanoma of the external auditory canal extending into the preauricular area and scalp

October 18, 2014  |  Mainak Dutta, MS; Soumya Ghatak, MS; Ramanuj Sinha, MS, DNB


Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are uncommon. When they do occur, they usually represent a metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases of primary malignant melanoma of the external auditory canal have been previously reported in the English-language...

Basal cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal

October 18, 2014  |  Nai-Wei Hsueh, MD; Min-Tsan Shu, MD

Basal cell carcinomas of the EAC are known to be locally aggressive, although they are not associated with regional lymph node metastasis.

Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath in the external auditory canal

October 18, 2014  |  Margherita Trani, MD; Massimo Zanni, MD; Paolo Gambelli, MD


Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) and pigmented villonodular synovitis belong to the same type of benign proliferative lesions originating in the synovia that usually affect the joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. They frequently involve the hands, knees, ankles,...

Bilateral external auditory canal cholesteatomas

March 19, 2014  |  Danielle M. Blake, BA; Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD

External auditory canal cholesteatomas may be classified as idiopathic or secondarily acquired, most commonly occurring in postoperative or post-traumatic settings.


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