Auditory Canal

Bilateral external auditory canal cholesteatomas

March 18, 2014     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
article

External auditory canal cholesteatomas may be classified as idiopathic or secondarily acquired, most commonly occurring in postoperative or post-traumatic settings.

Case report: Dermal inclusion cyst of the external auditory canal

December 20, 2013     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Jonathan S. Kulbersh, MD; Paul R. Lambert, MD
article

Abstract

Dermal inclusion cysts are benign masses that arise as the result of the entrapment of ectodermal components during embryogenesis. Their presenting symptoms are a direct result of the mass effect of the growing cyst. We describe the case of a 23-month-old girl who presented with a single, large dermal inclusion cyst in the external auditory canal. Our review of the literature revealed that only 2 other cases of a dermal inclusion cyst in this location have been previously reported.

Medial canal fibrosis

September 18, 2013     Joseph A. Ursick, MD; John W. House, MD
article

Medial canal fibrosis is an uncommon condition characterized by progressive stenosis of the bony external auditory canal.

Ganglion cyst in the external auditory canal

August 21, 2013     Chi-Kyou Lee, MD; Mee-Hye Oh, MD; and Kye Hoon Park, MD
article

In rare instances, ganglion cysts of the TMJ can pre-sent as a mass of the EAC, sometimes without obvious communication with the glenoid fossa.

Thiersch skin grafting in otologic surgery

August 21, 2013     Helen Xu, MD; Natasha Pollak, MD, MS; and Michael M. Paparella, MD
article

Abstract

Thiersch skin grafting is an old but highly effective surgical technique in otology. We frequently place a Thiersch graft after otologic procedures that either create a mastoid cavity or result in reduced skin coverage of a portion of the external auditory canal. The purpose of this article is to introduce this surgical technique to a new generation of otologists. We discuss its indications, the surgical technique, tips for a successful outcome, and postoperative care. A key to successful skin grafting is to perform the procedure about 10 days after the primary procedure to allow sufficient time for the formation of an adequate vascular bed at the recipient site. The goal in all cases is to achieve a safe, dry ear that is covered with keratinizing squamous epithelium. Thiersch grafting accomplishes this very well.

Large osteoma of the external auditory canal

July 21, 2013     Takashi Iizuka, MD; Takuo Haruyama, MD; Keiko Nagaya, MD
article

Cicatricial external auditory canal stenosis caused by ectodermal dysplasia: Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome

June 11, 2013     Amanda B. Sosulski, MD and James D. Hayes, MD
article

Abstract

We present a case of recurrent cicatricial stenosis of the external ear canals caused by ectodermal dysplasia, specifically Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome, in a 45-year-old woman. No form of medical or surgical management has produced durable patency of the patient's ear canals, and her hearing loss is being managed with hearing aids. Topical management of the recurring external otitis slows the process but has been unsuccessful in preventing restenosis of both external auditory canals.

Cavernous hemangioma of the external auditory canal

April 17, 2013     Min-Tsan Shu, MD; Kang-Chao Wu, MD; Yu-Chun Chen, MD
article

The differential diagnosisfor cavernous hemangioma of the external auditory canal includes attic cholesteatoma with aural polyp, glomus tumor, arteriovenous malformation, granulation tissue, and carcinoma of the EAC.

Large bilateral internal auditory meatus associated with bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence

January 24, 2013     Leonardo Manzari, MD; Paola Scagnelli, MD
article

Abstract

Superior semicircular canal dehiscence and an abnormally wide internal auditory meatus are clinical entities characterized by vestibular and cochlear symptoms. These symptoms are induced by hypersensitivity of labyrinthine receptors secondary to a bone defect of the otic capsule. We report the case of a 41-year-old man with congenital right-sided hearing loss who presented with bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence that was associated with wide, bulbous internal auditory meatus and a loss of the bony wall separating the lateral end of the meatus from the cochlea. The patient was experiencing vestibular and cochlear symptoms in the right ear and disabling tinnitus in the left ear. However, he refused all treatment and was lost to follow-up.

Primary cutaneous CD30-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the external auditory canal

December 31, 2012     Nuno Marcal, MD; Sofia Campelos, MD; Luis Dias, MD; Matos Goncalves, MD; Gabriel Pereira, MD; Tiago Godinho, MD
article

Abstract

Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is rare. Cutaneous lymphoma is defined as primary when there is an absence of nodal or systemic disease during the first 6 months following diagnosis. We report what we believe to be the first documented case of a primary cutaneous CD30-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the external auditory canal. The patient was an elderly woman who presented with progressively worsening right otalgia and hypoacusis. Otoscopy revealed an erythematic, ulcerative, nonbleeding, localized lesion in the anterosuperior area of the external auditory canal. The patient underwent an excisional biopsy, and after the diagnosis was established, she underwent 22 sessions of radiotherapy. During follow-up, she exhibited no evidence of recurrence.

Case report: Metastatic small-cell lung carcinoma of the external auditory canal

October 31, 2012     Moshe Hain, MD; Edit Feldberg, MD; and Doron Halperin, MD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 73-year-old man who developed metastatic small-cell lung cancer to the bony external auditory canal (EAC). The patient had only recently been diagnosed with his primary carcinoma. The metastasis presented as a bulky, fleshy, bleeding mass in the right EAC. Biopsy of the metastasis revealed that its histologic characteristics were identical to those of the primary. This case is of interest because this was a unique type of metastasis to the EAC. Although there are reports in the literature of lung cancer and even small-cell cancer metastasizing to the temporal bone, we could find no previously published report of a small-cell lung carcinoma metastasizing to the EAC.

Intradermal melanocytic nevus of the external auditory canal

August 10, 2012     Kai-Chieh Chan, MD; Chi-Ju Yeh, MD; Wan-Ling Ho, MD
article

Intradermal melanocytic nevi are usually asymptomatic, but a patient with such a lesion in the external auditory canal can present with aural obstruction and conductive deafness.

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