Pediatric Otolaryngology

Pediatric cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma with Horner syndrome: A rare case presentation

March 18, 2014     Sanjeev Bhagat, MS; Saurabh Varshney, MS; Sampan S. Bist, MS; and Nitin Gupta, MS
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Abstract

Schwannomas are rare, benign, slowly growing neurogenic tumors that originate in peripheral, spinal, or cranial nerves other than the optic and olfactory nerves. In the head and neck, these tumors usually arise from the vagus nerve and the cervical sympathetic chain in the parapharyngeal space. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannomas represent a rare subgroup of schwannomas; fewer than 60 cases have been reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely seen in children and adolescents. Because patients typically present with an asymptomatic neck mass and vague complaints, clinical suspicion is important in making the diagnosis. Neural deficits at presentation are uncommon. The presence of features of Horner syndrome before excision is very rare, having been previously reported in only 10 cases of cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma. We report an extremely rare case of a cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma in a child who presented with Horner syndrome. The lesion was successfully excised.

Pseudo third cranial nerve palsy secondary to orbital ectopic lacrimal gland cyst: Management with functional endoscopic sinus surgery

February 12, 2014     Puneet S. Braich, BSc; Jonathan E. Silbert, MD; Andrew J. Levada, MD; and Neil R. Schiff, MD
article

Abstract

An otherwise healthy 13-month-old girl was noted by her pediatrician to have developed a left head turn. The patient was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist, who noticed signs of incomplete third cranial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of an abnormal lesion in the inferonasal orbit that was abutting the ethmoid sinus. After consultation with an ENT specialist, the decision was made to remove the lesion via functional endoscopic sinus surgery because this approach was deemed to provide adequate access while limiting morbidity. Histology of the excised lesion identified it as true ectopic lacrimal gland tissue with cysts. We recognize and comment on the fact that in many reported cases of ectopic lacrimal gland cyst, the tissue was not ectopic at all but instead represented an extension of normal lacrimal gland tissue.

Bilateral dacryocystoceles as a rare cause of neonatal respiratory distress: Report of 2 cases

January 21, 2014     Mélanie Lecavalier, MD; Lily H.P. Nguyen, MD, MSc, FRCSC
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Abstract

Although obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct is a fairly common finding in newborns, development of a dacryocystocele (nasolacrimal duct cyst) is uncommon. Bilateral dacryocystoceles that expand intranasally and cause respiratory distress in the newborn are rarer still. We present 2 cases of bilateral dacryocystoceles that caused neonatal respiratory compromise. Our first patient, a newborn girl, was managed successfully with probing of the nasolacrimal ducts and endoscopic marsupialization of the cysts. Our second patient, a newborn boy, responded well to conservative treatment with a nasal decongestant, lacrimal sac massage, and warm compresses. While bilateral dacryocystoceles are rare, they should be considered in cases of neonatal respiratory distress and concomitant nasal obstruction.

A rare cause of submandibular swelling in a 12-year-old child: Pleomorphic adenoma

January 21, 2014     Puneet S. Braich, MD, MPH; Shohan Shetty, MD; Archana Lingampally, MBBS; Michael S. Ajemian, MD, FACS; Mahesh H. Bhaya, MBBS, FACS
article

Abstract

Pleomorphic adenoma is rare in pediatric populations, where viral and congenital problems are the usual culprits responsible for submandibular masses. We report the case of a 12-year-old child who presented with a painless right submandibular mass that had developed over the course of 4 months. The patient denied fever, erythema, and edema. The mass was diagnosed as a branchial cleft cyst before complete excision was performed. The pattern and etiology of a pleomorphic adenoma in children differs from those in adults. In children, it requires prompt and correct diagnosis to keep morbidity and mortality at a minimum.

Recurrent chondro-osseous respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the nasal cavity in a child

January 21, 2014     Kazuhiro Nomura, MD, PhD; Takeshi Oshima, MD, PhD; Atsuko Maki, MD, PhD; Takahiro Suzuki, MD, PhD; Kenjiro Higashi, MD; Mika Watanabe, MD, PhD; Toshimitsu Kobayashi, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

Chondro-osseous respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma (COREAH) is an extremely rare type of hamartoma. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 case has been previously reported. A 7-year-old girl presented with a case of COREAH of the bilateral nasal cavities. Polypous masses in both nasal cavities were resected endoscopically, and they were histologically diagnosed as COREAH. A large polypous mass recurred 1 year postsurgically on the right side only. A second endoscopic surgery was performed, and the lesion was confirmed to be recurrent COREAH. Hamartoma of the nasal cavity is rare and is generally considered to be self-limiting. This case suggests that nasal hamartomas may have neoplastic characteristics, and therefore require complete resection.

Cervical accessory tragus: An unusual pediatric neck mass

January 21, 2014     Thomas R. Lowry, MD
article

An accessory tragus occurs as the result of a developmental anomaly of the first branchial arch, and it may be associated with other branchial cleft abnormalities.

Tracheal bronchus in an 11-month-old infant

October 23, 2013     Robert Sprecher, MD, FACS, FAAP; Gary Josephson, MD, FACS, FAAP
article

The possibility of a tracheal bronchus should be entertained when a patient presents with recurrent right upper lobe pneumonia or right upper lobe collapse.

Infected sublingual hematoma: A rare complication of frenulectomy

July 21, 2013     Amal Isaiah, MD, DPhil; Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS
article

Given the spectrum of potential poor outcomes, some consensus has emerged in favor of early surgical management of significant ankyloglossia.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a cause of neonatal suppurative parotitis: A report of two cases and review of the literature

June 11, 2013     Sean T. Donovan, MD; Grant T. Rohman, MD; John P. Selph, MD; Roy Rajan, MD; Rosemary M. Stocks, MD; and Jerome W. Thompson, MD, MBA
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Abstract

Suppurative parotitis is an uncommon entity identified in newborns. While Staphylococcus aureus has been frequently identified as the causative pathogen among the few patients diagnosed with neonatal suppurative parotitis (NSP), there has only been one prior case described in the literature that was due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Because of its virulence, MRSA presents new and substantial challenges for the surgeon; we describe two cases of NSP caused by MRSA and the subsequent surgical intervention necessitated for cure. We also include a review of all cases of NSP described in the English-language literature.

Intrapharyngeal schwannoma in a pediatric patient

June 11, 2013     Nader Nassif, MD; Mariaelisabetta Cottelli, MD; Davide Farina, MD; and Marco Berlucchi, MD
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Abstract

Schwannomas are benign peripheral nerve neoplasms that arise from Schwann cells. They usually occur in the adult population. The most common site in the head and neck region is the parapharyngeal space. Intrapharyngeal schwannomas are extremely rare, and those that have been reported all occurred in adults. We report what to the best of our knowledge is the first case of an intrapharyngeal schwannoma in a pediatric patient. The patient, a 15-year-old boy, was treated successfully with surgical excision.

Laryngeal plexiform neurofibroma in a child

June 11, 2013     Fikret Kasapoglu, MD; Talip Ozdemircan, MD; and Levent Erisen, MD
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Abstract

Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetically inherited, autosomal dominant disease, characterized by multiple cafe au lait spots, cutaneous neurofibromas and “Lisch nodules.” Neurofibromatosis can develop from a neural source at any age. However, neurofibroma of the larynx is extremely rare and is usually manifested by obstructive airway symptoms. We encountered a 5-year-old child presenting with stridor and dyspnea, who had a diagnosis of laryngeal plexiform neurofibroma. The purpose of our report is the consideration of laryngeal NF in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea in infants and children.

Congenital cholesteatoma in a 3-year-old

April 17, 2013     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Senja Tomovic, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
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 When a congenital cholesteatoma is diagnosed early as a localized circumscribed mass, it can be resected with a very low risk of recurrence.

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