Vocal Fold

Vocal fold immobility from a primary minor salivary gland small-cell carcinoma: Case report

February 1, 2009     Robert L. Witt, MD, FACS and Patrick A. Wilson, MD, FCAP
article

Abstract

Small-cell carcinoma of a minor salivary gland is a rare and to the best of our knowledge previously unreported cause of vocal fold immobility. We describe the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia, and weight loss. Examination revealed left vocal fold immobility. She had no other obvious abnormality of the upper airway, neck, or skin. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 4-cm submucosal oropharyngeal mass with extension to the parapharyngeal space and involvement of the carotid sheath and the foramen ovale at the skull base; imaging also revealed cervical adenopathy. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy identified the mass as a small-cell carcinoma, a finding that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Extensive tumor invasion and multiple comorbidities precluded an aggressive management strategy, and the patient was treated palliatively. She died of her disease shortly after her diagnosis. Vocal fold immobility of unknown etiology mandates imaging from the skull base to the upper mediastinum.

An unusual presentation of Teflon granuloma: Case report and discussion

January 1, 2009     Nitin A. Pagedar, MD, Catherine M. Listinsky, MD, and Harvey M. Tucker, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

For more than 25 years, Teflon was the most commonly used material for injection laryngoplasty. However, the incidence of Teflon granuloma and the consequent deterioration of glottic function ultimately led to the development of other injectable materials, and as a result, Teflon granulomas are no longer frequently encountered. We present a case of Teflon granuloma that was unusual in that (1) a long period of time had elapsed between the injection and the granuloma formation and (2) there was no change in the patient's glottic function.

The floppy vocal polyp

December 1, 2008     Omar Rahmat, MD, MS and Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS
article

Mucosal tear

September 25, 2008     Mark A. Ginsburg, DO, Robert L. Eller, MD, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Acute vocal fold hemorrhage after thyroplasty

July 31, 2008     Robert Eller, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, RN, BSN, CORLN, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

A rare cause of dysphonia

July 31, 2008     Iman Naseri, MD, Sarah K. Wise, MD, and Adam M. Klein, MD
article

Abstract

Although dysphonia is a common complaint among patients seen in an otolaryngology clinic, an autoimmune cause of the problem is less common. Autoimmune disease can be the source of various laryngologic manifestations, but diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion, careful patient evaluation and testing, and videolaryngoscopy (videostroboscopy if available) to uncover specific identifying findings. This report describes a patient presenting with upper-range vocal difficulties who was found to have early systemic lupus erythematosus.

Leukoplakia

March 31, 2008     Robert Eller, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, RN, BSN, CORLN, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

True vocal fold pseudocyst

February 1, 2008     Mark A. Ginsburg, DO, Robert L. Eller, MD, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

January 1, 2008     Soham Roy, MD and Richard J. Vivero, MD
article

Vocal fold cyst and fibrosis

December 1, 2007     Venu Divi, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, BSN, RN, CORLN, and Robert Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Vocal fold paralysis secondary to a jugular foramen schwannoma

September 30, 2007     Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
article

Vocal fold paralysis can be caused by deficits in the superior laryngeal nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, or the complete vagal nerve. When it occurs, the radiologist should examine the neck for the presence of a lesion along the course of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), which passes through the pars nervosa of the jugular foramen and along the carotid sheath

Squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as a vocal fold papilloma

September 30, 2007     Jeffrey C. Liu, MD; Lucian Sulica, MD
article

A 63-year-old woman, a property manager, presented to our office with a 6-month history of hoarseness that had been preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Her voice had steadily deteriorated during this time.

PreviousPage
of 9Next