Vocal Fold

The floppy vocal polyp

December 1, 2008     Omar Rahmat, MD, MS and Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS
article

Mucosal tear

September 25, 2008     Mark A. Ginsburg, DO, Robert L. Eller, MD, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

A rare cause of dysphonia

July 31, 2008     Iman Naseri, MD, Sarah K. Wise, MD, and Adam M. Klein, MD
article

Abstract

Although dysphonia is a common complaint among patients seen in an otolaryngology clinic, an autoimmune cause of the problem is less common. Autoimmune disease can be the source of various laryngologic manifestations, but diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion, careful patient evaluation and testing, and videolaryngoscopy (videostroboscopy if available) to uncover specific identifying findings. This report describes a patient presenting with upper-range vocal difficulties who was found to have early systemic lupus erythematosus.

Acute vocal fold hemorrhage after thyroplasty

July 31, 2008     Robert Eller, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, RN, BSN, CORLN, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Leukoplakia

March 31, 2008     Robert Eller, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, RN, BSN, CORLN, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

True vocal fold pseudocyst

February 1, 2008     Mark A. Ginsburg, DO, Robert L. Eller, MD, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

January 1, 2008     Soham Roy, MD and Richard J. Vivero, MD
article

Vocal fold cyst and fibrosis

December 1, 2007     Venu Divi, MD, Mary Hawkshaw, BSN, RN, CORLN, and Robert Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

Squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as a vocal fold papilloma

September 30, 2007     Jeffrey C. Liu, MD; Lucian Sulica, MD
article

A 63-year-old woman, a property manager, presented to our office with a 6-month history of hoarseness that had been preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Her voice had steadily deteriorated during this time.

Vocal fold paralysis secondary to a jugular foramen schwannoma

September 30, 2007     Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
article

Vocal fold paralysis can be caused by deficits in the superior laryngeal nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, or the complete vagal nerve. When it occurs, the radiologist should examine the neck for the presence of a lesion along the course of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), which passes through the pars nervosa of the jugular foramen and along the carotid sheath

Botulinum toxin A: A novel adjunct treatment for debilitating habit cough in children

August 31, 2007     J. Andrew Sipp, MD; Kennan E. Haver, MD; Bruce J. Masek, PhD; Christopher J. Hartnick, MD
article
Abstract
Vocal fold injection with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) may be used as an adjunct treatment for habit cough in children. We conducted a retrospective review of 3 cases involving children aged 11 to 13 years with habit cough treated with vocal fold injection of BTX-A. Injections of BTX-A to the thyroarytenoid muscles were effective in breaking the cough cycle in all 3 children. Their coughs recurred but were controlled with 4 to 8 sessions of behavioral therapy. Behavioral therapy remains the first-line treatment, but BTX-A may be a useful complement to behavioral therapy in patients who fail standard treatments or in those with severe cough who have limited or delayed access to mental health professionals. This is the first report, to our knowledge, on the use of BTX-A in the treatment of a habit cough.

Posthemorrhagic polyp

July 31, 2007     Robert Eller, MD; Mary Hawkshaw, RN, BSN, CORLN; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article

A 27-year-old Web site designer experienced sudden hoarseness after yelling at a sporting event. Over the next 6 to 8 weeks, he experienced a general, but incomplete, improvement in his voice. Following a videostroboscopic examination (figure), he was diagnosed with a posthemorrhagic vocal fold polyp.

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