Pharynx

The harm of ham hocks: Foreign body impaction in long-standing multiple sclerosis

March 2, 2015     Anish Patel, MD; Jacqueline Weinstein, MD; Mandy Weidenhaft, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
article

The incidence of foreign body impaction in neurologic dysfunctional swallowing, such as in multiple sclerosis (MS), has been not widely reported.

Plexiform schwannoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2

March 2, 2015     Luca Raimondo, MD; Massimiliano Garzaro, MD; Jasenka Mazibrada, MD, PhD; Giancarlo Pecorari, MD; Carlo Giordano, MD
article

Abstract

We report a case of plexiform schwannoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall that occurred in a 37-year-old man who had been previously diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Plexiform schwannoma has been rarely reported in association with NF2. Moreover, as far as we know, only 6 cases of posterior pharyngeal wall schwannoma have been previously reported in the literature, none of which was associated with NF2 and none of which was histopathologically differentiated in schwannoma or plexiform schwannoma. The patient was treated with laser excision of the tumor via a transoral route, and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up, he exhibited no signs of recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first reported case of a posterior pharyngeal wall schwannoma that occurred in association with NF2 and the first case in which the schwannoma was removed via transoral laser excision. This case illustrates that plexiform schwannoma is a possible finding in NF2 and that transoral laser excision is a safe surgical procedure in such a case.

Bilateral Eagle syndrome causing dysphagia

February 2, 2015     Lyndsay L. Madden, DO; Roxann Diez Gross, PhD; Libby J. Smith, DO
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Patients with Eagle syndrome often report symptoms that include dysphagia, otalgia, throat pain, globus sensation, facial pain, headache, taste disturbances, and dental pain that worsen with chewing, head and tongue movements, and swallowing.

Retropharyngeal masses in neurofibromatosis type 1: Imaging findings in 2 cases

December 19, 2014     Roy Riascos, MD; Jennifer Dodds, MD; Nirav Patel, MD
article

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) affects mesenchymal development via multisystemic manifestations. We present 2 cases of NF-1 that manifested as a retropharyngeal mass-1 as a lateral cervical meningocele in a 60-year-old man and the other as a focal neurofibroma in a 37-year-old man. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was invaluable in identifying the exact nature of the 2 lesions; no contrast enhancement was seen in the case of the meningocele, and enhancement was seen in the case of the neurofibroma. These 2 cases illustrate the importance of the history and contrast-enhanced MRI in managing NF-1 patients with a retropharyngeal mass.

Fusobacterium necrophorum in a pediatric retropharyngeal abscess: A case report and review of the literature

December 19, 2014     Jeffrey Cheng, MD; Andrew J. Kleinberger, MD; Andrew Sikora, MD, PhD
article

We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed a deep space neck infection following cervical trauma. He was initially managed conservatively with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but when he failed to improve clinically, he required surgical drainage. Wound cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum, an uncommon pathogen that can cause pediatric deep neck space infections, especially when it is not associated with Lemierre syndrome. The prognosis for this infection is favorable when it is identified early. Treatment with culture-directed antibiotics and surgical drainage as indicated is appropriate. When treating a pediatric deep neck space infection empirically, physicians should avoid treatment with a macrolide antibiotic, since Fusobacterium spp may be involved and they are often resistant to this class of drugs.

Hypopharyngeal hemangioma in an adult: A case report

October 17, 2014     Lindsay Reder, MD; Sunil Verma, MD; Niels Kokot, MD
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Abstract

Hemangiomas of the postcricoid region have been reported almost exclusively in infants and young children. Our adult patient with symptoms of dysphagia and weight loss underwent transoral CO2 laser microsurgery of a postcricoid mass, and final pathologic examination confirmed the presence of a hemangioma. She is doing well after surgery, with an excellent voice, resolution of dysphagia, and no evidence of recurrence. There have been few cases of hypopharyngeal hemangioma in the adult population; to our knowledge, there have been no reports in the English-language literature of adult patients diagnosed specifically with a postcricoid hemangioma. Otolaryngologists should be familiar with the presentation and treatment of this unusual entity.

Synchronous double cancers of the hypopharynx: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma and squamous cell carcinoma

October 17, 2014     Shao-Cheng Liu, MD; Wan-Fu Su, MD
article

Abstract

We report a unique case of synchronous double hypopharyngeal tumors in a 39-year-old man. The patient presented with a 1-year history of a muffled voice and mild odynophagia. Laryngoscopy detected two grossly different tumors in the hypopharynx: a malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in the postcricoid area and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the posterior pharyngeal wall. Chemoradiotherapy was administered, and the patient was free of disease at 23 months of follow-up. Synchronous double cancers of the hypopharynx that feature different oncotypes are very rare, especially those that include an MFH. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, no case of synchronous MFH and SCC of the hypopharynx has been previously reported in the literature. Because the number of reported cases of MFH in the hypopharynx is so small, no consensus exists with respect to the preferred option among the various treatment choices.

A transoral surgical approach to a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma

October 17, 2014     Christopher Schutt, MD; Joehassin Cordero, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

It is relatively difficult to gain surgical access to pleomorphic adenomas of the parapharyngeal space. Since the lateral border is the mandible, gaining access to them can put several important neurovascular structures at risk. A number of surgical approaches have been developed to overcome this difficulty, and each has its advantages and disadvantages. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma that was accessed via a transoral approach. Transoral approaches are controversial and rarely used. However, we feel that for a selected group of tumors, this approach provides clear benefits by decreasing cosmetic and functional disability while providing good surgical access to the tumor.

Transoral approach to a deep-lobe parotid tumor

October 17, 2014     Lyndon Gonzalez, BS; Alex Fernandez, MS; Belinda Mantle, MD
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Because of their location in this potential space, parapharyngeal tumors tend to be asymptomatic and remain undetected for a long time.

Actinomycosis of the pharynx

September 17, 2014     Anna M. Lipowska, MD; Michael M. Johns III, MD
article

Abstract

Few cases of pharyngeal actinomycosis have been documented in the literature. We describe the case of a 67-year-old white man who presented with symptoms of dysphagia. Laryngoscopy revealed a pedunculated mass in the left posterior pharyngeal wall; an excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 10 weeks of intravenous penicillin therapy followed by 4 months of oral antibiotics, and his condition resolved. We discuss the diagnosis, management, and complications of this rare infection.

Using a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to prevent postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy: A study of 88 cases

August 27, 2014     Masoud Naghibzadeh, MD; Ramin Zojaji, MD; Nematollah Mokhtari Amir Majdi, MD; Morteza Mazloum Farsi Baf, MD
article

Abstract

Complications of total laryngectomy can have serious implications for the final outcome of treatment, including pharyngocutaneous fistula. We conducted a retrospective study of surgical techniques to determine how to best prevent or decrease the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula following total laryngectomy. We reviewed the hospital records of all patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma at Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, from March 1989 through February 2005. We identified 88 such patients-80 men and 8 women. We divided this cohort into two groups according to the type of pharyngeal defect closure they received. A total of 37 patients-31 men and 6 women (mean age: 61.4 ± 5.9 yr) underwent primary closure along with a sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCMM) flap (flap group). The other 51 patients-49 men and 2 women (mean age: 61.3 ± 4.4 yr)-underwent standard primary closure without creation of an SCMM flap (nonflap group). Overall, postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula occurred in 9 of the 88 patients (10.2%)-1 case in the flap group (2.7%) and 8 cases in the nonflap group (15.7%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 0.612, 95% confidence interval = 0.451 to 0.832), independent of other factors. We found no correlation between fistula development and age (p = 0.073), sex (p = 0.065), or tumor location (p = 0.435). Likewise, we found no correlation between tumor location and either sex (p = 0.140) or age (p = 0.241). We conclude that including an SCMM flap in the surgical process would significantly decrease the development of fistula, regardless of age, sex, and tumor site.

Transoral removal of a large parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with the Harmonic Scalpel

July 13, 2014     Marcel Marjanovic Kavanagh, MD; Zlatko Sabol, MD, PhD, MSc; Sasa Janjanin, MD, PhD; Drago Prgomet, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 19-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented for evaluation of odynophagia, left-sided hemiparesis, multiple café au lait spots all over his body, and numerous subcutaneous and cutaneous neurofibromas. Imaging revealed the presence of two large neurofibromas-a 60 x 50 x 35-mm tumor in the left parapharyngeal space and an intradural tumor measuring 25 mm in diameter. We removed the larger tumor via a transoral route with the Harmonic Scalpel. The size of this tumor far exceeded the size of any other reported tumor removed in this manner. Various approaches to the parapharyngeal space have been described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a transoral removal of a huge parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with a Harmonic Scalpel.

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