Pharynx

A transoral surgical approach to a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma

October 17, 2014     Christopher Schutt, MD; Joehassin Cordero, MD, FACS
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Abstract

It is relatively difficult to gain surgical access to pleomorphic adenomas of the parapharyngeal space. Since the lateral border is the mandible, gaining access to them can put several important neurovascular structures at risk. A number of surgical approaches have been developed to overcome this difficulty, and each has its advantages and disadvantages. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma that was accessed via a transoral approach. Transoral approaches are controversial and rarely used. However, we feel that for a selected group of tumors, this approach provides clear benefits by decreasing cosmetic and functional disability while providing good surgical access to the tumor.

Synchronous double cancers of the hypopharynx: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma and squamous cell carcinoma

October 17, 2014     Shao-Cheng Liu, MD; Wan-Fu Su, MD
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Abstract

We report a unique case of synchronous double hypopharyngeal tumors in a 39-year-old man. The patient presented with a 1-year history of a muffled voice and mild odynophagia. Laryngoscopy detected two grossly different tumors in the hypopharynx: a malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in the postcricoid area and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the posterior pharyngeal wall. Chemoradiotherapy was administered, and the patient was free of disease at 23 months of follow-up. Synchronous double cancers of the hypopharynx that feature different oncotypes are very rare, especially those that include an MFH. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, no case of synchronous MFH and SCC of the hypopharynx has been previously reported in the literature. Because the number of reported cases of MFH in the hypopharynx is so small, no consensus exists with respect to the preferred option among the various treatment choices.

Transoral approach to a deep-lobe parotid tumor

October 17, 2014     Lyndon Gonzalez, BS; Alex Fernandez, MS; Belinda Mantle, MD
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Because of their location in this potential space, parapharyngeal tumors tend to be asymptomatic and remain undetected for a long time.

Hypopharyngeal hemangioma in an adult: A case report

October 17, 2014     Lindsay Reder, MD; Sunil Verma, MD; Niels Kokot, MD
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Abstract

Hemangiomas of the postcricoid region have been reported almost exclusively in infants and young children. Our adult patient with symptoms of dysphagia and weight loss underwent transoral CO2 laser microsurgery of a postcricoid mass, and final pathologic examination confirmed the presence of a hemangioma. She is doing well after surgery, with an excellent voice, resolution of dysphagia, and no evidence of recurrence. There have been few cases of hypopharyngeal hemangioma in the adult population; to our knowledge, there have been no reports in the English-language literature of adult patients diagnosed specifically with a postcricoid hemangioma. Otolaryngologists should be familiar with the presentation and treatment of this unusual entity.

Actinomycosis of the pharynx

September 17, 2014     Anna M. Lipowska, MD; Michael M. Johns III, MD
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Abstract

Few cases of pharyngeal actinomycosis have been documented in the literature. We describe the case of a 67-year-old white man who presented with symptoms of dysphagia. Laryngoscopy revealed a pedunculated mass in the left posterior pharyngeal wall; an excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 10 weeks of intravenous penicillin therapy followed by 4 months of oral antibiotics, and his condition resolved. We discuss the diagnosis, management, and complications of this rare infection.

Using a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to prevent postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy: A study of 88 cases

August 27, 2014     Masoud Naghibzadeh, MD; Ramin Zojaji, MD; Nematollah Mokhtari Amir Majdi, MD; Morteza Mazloum Farsi Baf, MD
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Abstract

Complications of total laryngectomy can have serious implications for the final outcome of treatment, including pharyngocutaneous fistula. We conducted a retrospective study of surgical techniques to determine how to best prevent or decrease the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula following total laryngectomy. We reviewed the hospital records of all patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma at Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, from March 1989 through February 2005. We identified 88 such patients-80 men and 8 women. We divided this cohort into two groups according to the type of pharyngeal defect closure they received. A total of 37 patients-31 men and 6 women (mean age: 61.4 ± 5.9 yr) underwent primary closure along with a sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCMM) flap (flap group). The other 51 patients-49 men and 2 women (mean age: 61.3 ± 4.4 yr)-underwent standard primary closure without creation of an SCMM flap (nonflap group). Overall, postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula occurred in 9 of the 88 patients (10.2%)-1 case in the flap group (2.7%) and 8 cases in the nonflap group (15.7%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 0.612, 95% confidence interval = 0.451 to 0.832), independent of other factors. We found no correlation between fistula development and age (p = 0.073), sex (p = 0.065), or tumor location (p = 0.435). Likewise, we found no correlation between tumor location and either sex (p = 0.140) or age (p = 0.241). We conclude that including an SCMM flap in the surgical process would significantly decrease the development of fistula, regardless of age, sex, and tumor site.

Transoral removal of a large parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with the Harmonic Scalpel

July 13, 2014     Marcel Marjanovic Kavanagh, MD; Zlatko Sabol, MD, PhD, MSc; Sasa Janjanin, MD, PhD; Drago Prgomet, MD, PhD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 19-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who presented for evaluation of odynophagia, left-sided hemiparesis, multiple café au lait spots all over his body, and numerous subcutaneous and cutaneous neurofibromas. Imaging revealed the presence of two large neurofibromas-a 60 x 50 x 35-mm tumor in the left parapharyngeal space and an intradural tumor measuring 25 mm in diameter. We removed the larger tumor via a transoral route with the Harmonic Scalpel. The size of this tumor far exceeded the size of any other reported tumor removed in this manner. Various approaches to the parapharyngeal space have been described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a transoral removal of a huge parapharyngeal space neurofibroma with a Harmonic Scalpel.

Retropharyngeal pseudoabscess manifesting in nephrotic syndrome

May 7, 2014     Shirish Johari, DLO, MRCSEd, DOHNS(Edin); Pankaj Handa, MD, MRCP(Ire), FAMS; Jin Keat Siow, MD, MBBS, FRCSEd
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Abstract

We describe a case of nephrotic syndrome that manifested as a retropharyngeal pseudoabscess. The patient was a 32-year-old man who presented with a short history of throat discomfort and a choking sensation. Laryngoscopy identified bulging of the posterior pharyngeal wall that partially occluded the laryngeal inlet. A lateral neck x-ray revealed that the prevertebral space was widened, and computed tomography detected fluid in the retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal spaces. Neck exploration revealed that the edema had been caused by nonsuppurative fluid. Biochemical analyses revealed marked hypoalbuminemia and heavy proteinuria suggestive of nephrotic syndrome. Following surgery, the patient's symptoms resolved. Aseptic effusion into the retropharyngeal space is rare; reported etiologies include internal jugular vein thrombosis, neoplasia, radiation therapy, trauma, acute calcific tendinitis, hereditary angioedema, and myxedema of hypothyroidism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of nephrotic syndrome initially manifesting as retropharyngeal pseudoabscess to be reported in the literature. Thrombotic occlusion of the pharyngeal venous plexus secondary to hypercoagulability is a plausible explanation for such isolated retropharyngeal effusion.

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: A conservative approach

March 18, 2014     Sriram Iyer, MRCP; Joseph Collum, MRCP; Marta Babores, FRCP
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Abstract

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a now-rare complication of dental and pharyngeal infections. Reports in the literature have emphasized the need for early, aggressive surgical intervention. We present a case of DNM with bilateral empyemas that arose secondary to a perforated pharyngeal abscess. The patient was successfully managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics and intercostal drainage. We conclude that conservative management with antibiotics and image-guided percutaneous pleural drainage may be initially appropriate for the stable patient.

Multilevel treatment of moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea with bone-anchored pharyngeal suspension sutures

August 21, 2013     Eric E. Berg, MD; Frederick Bunge, MD; and John M. DelGaudio, MD
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Abstract

Success rates for the surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) vary, with phase I surgical success ranging from 40 to 75%. Pharyngeal suspension suture procedures are minimally invasive techniques with a reported efficacy of 20 to 78%. We conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of pharyngeal suspension suture procedures in conjunction with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) as a multilevel treatment for OSA. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 30 adults-22 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 49 years and a mean BMI of 30.6-who were treated at a tertiary care academic medical center and a private otolaryngology practice. All patients had moderate or severe OSA, and all had failed continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Of this group, 20 patients underwent tongue base and hyoid suspension (TBHS) and 10 underwent tongue base suspension (TBS) alone; 23 patients had undergone concurrent or previous UPPP, 13 in the TBHS group and all 10 in the TBS group. Polysomnography was performed an average of 3.9 months postoperatively. Surgical success was defined as a reduction in respiratory distress index (RDI) of more than 50% and a postoperative RDI of 20 or less. The overall surgical success rate was 63% (19/30). In the surgical success group, the mean RDI fell from 44.6 to 9.4 (p < 0.0001); in the surgical failure group, the mean RDI rose from 41.3 to 48.9 (p = 0.58). There were 6 complications: 3 seromas, 2 suture breaks, and 1 dislodged screw. We conclude that pharyngeal suspension suture procedures as part of the multilevel treatment of moderate and severe OSA yields better outcomes than conventional surgical treatments with the added benefit of being minimally invasive.

A systematic review of proton-pump inhibitor therapy for laryngopharyngeal reflux

August 21, 2013     Uchechukwu C. Megwalu, MD
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Abstract

The author performed a MEDLINE literature search to identify and evaluate all randomized, placebo-controlled trials of the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) with an oral proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) that have been published since 1966. Eight such trials that included a total of 358 patients were identified. These eight studies contained seven different definitions of LPR. Validity scores (maximum: 9) ranged from 5 to 9 (mean: 7.5). One study investigated low-dose once-daily therapy, two studies investigated low-dose twice-daily therapy, and five studies investigated high-dose twice-daily therapy. Outcomes measures were not consistent among studies, and most studies used unvalidated outcomes measures. Only two studies found that a PPI was significantly better than placebo-one in the low-dose twice-daily group and one in the high-dose twice-daily group. The author concludes that the current body of literature is insufficient to draw reliable conclusions about the efficacy of PPI therapy for the treatment of LPR.

Intrapharyngeal schwannoma in a pediatric patient

June 11, 2013     Nader Nassif, MD; Mariaelisabetta Cottelli, MD; Davide Farina, MD; and Marco Berlucchi, MD
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Abstract

Schwannomas are benign peripheral nerve neoplasms that arise from Schwann cells. They usually occur in the adult population. The most common site in the head and neck region is the parapharyngeal space. Intrapharyngeal schwannomas are extremely rare, and those that have been reported all occurred in adults. We report what to the best of our knowledge is the first case of an intrapharyngeal schwannoma in a pediatric patient. The patient, a 15-year-old boy, was treated successfully with surgical excision.

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