Oropharynx

Oropharyngeal reconstruction using a myomucosal uvular transposition flap following transoral resection of oropharyngeal carcinoma

October 31, 2009     Akhtar Hussain, FRCS and Andrew Evans, MRCS, DLO
article

Abstract

Defects in the structure of the oropharynx can result in significant functional deficit and lead to nasal regurgitation and rhinolalia aperta. Many techniques have been described to reconstruct surgical oropharyngeal defects that are created during resection of squamous cell carcinoma, including the use of local advancement flaps and free-tissue transfers. We describe our experience with using a myomucosal uvular transposition flap for oropharyngeal reconstruction in a series of 11 patients. Unlike flap techniques that involve the use of palatal or uvular tissue, our technique does not require release incisions in the contralateral palate. This simple technique can be used to reconstruct defects as large as 50% of the soft palate and lateral oropharynx with minimal postoperative morbidity and only a minimal increase in surgical time compared with free-tissue transfer and myocutaneous pedicled flaps.

Aggressive fibromatosis of the oropharynx: A multidisciplinary approach to a benign disease

April 30, 2009     Eleftheria Kiverniti, MRCSEd, DO-HNS, Ulkem Cilasun, DDS, PhD, Arvind Singh, BSc, MRCS, DLO, Rehan Kazi, MS, Peter M. Clarke, BSc, FRCS, and Daniel J. Archer, FDSRCS, FRCS
article

Abstract

We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with aggressive fibromatosis of the oropharynx that was initially treated elsewhere as a peritonsillar abscess. We discuss the characteristics of this rare tumor and review the literature, stressing the importance of postoperative follow-up for peritonsillar abscesses to avoid missing other important diagnoses, such as the one described here.

Prognostic significance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in oropharyngeal cancer

July 31, 2007     Samer Rajjoub, BA; Suzanne R. Basha, MD; Eugene Einhorn, MD; Marc C. Cohen, MD; Doug M. Marvel, BA; Duane A. Sewell, MD
article
Abstract
The presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has been shown to significantly improve clinical outcomes in many types of cancer. However, their effects on outcomes in patients with oropharyngeal cancer specifically have yet to be elucidated. We conducted a retrospective study in an effort to shed light on this issue. We reviewed the records of 48 consecutively presenting patients with oropharyngeal cancer, and we performed immunohistochemistry to analyze their archived paraffin-embedded tissue samples for the presence of CD3-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. We also used real-time polymerase chain reaction testing to look for human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) in the tumors. We found that patients with large numbers of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (CD3high) had a significantly lower incidence of metastasis at presentation than did those with low numbers of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (CD3low) (40.0 vs. 88.5%; p = 0.001), regardless of HPV status. When HPV status was taken into account, the correlation between a high CD3 count and a lower rate of metastasis was maintained in the HPV-positive patients but not in the HPV-negative patients. We also found that the CD3high patients had higher rates of overall survival and disease-free survival at 3 and 5 years than did the CD3low patients; however, these differences only approached but did not reach statistical significance.

The prevalence of colonization with drug-resistant pneumococci among adult workers in children's daycare

January 1, 2007     Frederick S. Rosen, MD; Matthew W. Ryan, MD
article
 

An unusually large choanal polyp that almost completely obstructed the oropharyngeal airway

July 31, 2006     Eaton Chen, MD, MPH, FACS; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

Synovial sarcomacy

June 30, 2006     Gretchen S. Folk, DDS, MS; Lester D.R. Thompson, MD, FASCP
article

Spindle-cell hemangioendothelioma of the posterior pharyngeal wall

May 31, 2005     Himani Lade, MBBS, MS; Neelima Gupta, MBBS, MS; P.P. Singh, MBBS, MS; Geeta Dev, MBBS, MD
article
Abstract
Spindle-cell hemangioendothelioma is an uncommon vascular lesion that exhibits a predilection for the extremities. Very few reports have been published describing this lesion in the head and neck, and to the best of our knowledge, its occurrence in the oropharynx has not been previously reported. In addition to reporting an unusual site of this lesion, our rationale for publishing this case is to comment on the diagnostic dilemma that arose in view of an unclear clinicohistopathologic pattern and to discuss this lesion's similarity to other aggressive tumors.

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: Trends in a developing country

April 1, 2005     Neena Chaudhary, MS; Sanjay Agrawal, MS; Anil K. Rai, MS
article
Abstract
Descending necrotizing mediastinitis is believed to be a rare and serious complication of odontogenic and oropharyngeal infections. It is associated with a high (up to 40%) mortality rate, which can be attributed to delays in diagnosis and inadequate surgical drainage. Between May 1999 and September 2002, we treated 7 cases at our institution in New Delhi, indicating that such fulminating infections are not so rare in developing countries. In our 7 cases, a high index of suspicion and early computed tomography helped us make a rapid diagnosis and initiate prompt treatment, which resulted in a favorable outcome in 6 cases (mortality rate: 14.3%).

Lemierre's syndrome

December 1, 2004     David Kirsch, MD; Devin Tighe, MD; Michael G. D'Antonio, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
article

Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the head and neck after radiation for squamous cell carcinoma

April 1, 2004     Kevin S. Sadati, DO; Marian Haber, MD; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA
article
PreviousPage
of 2