Larynx

Extraskeletal giant cell tumor of the larynx: Case report and review of the literature

April 30, 2011     Mana Rochanawutanon, MD, Phurich Praneetvatakul, MD, Jiraporn Laothamatas, MD, and Vorachai Sirikulchayanonta, MD
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Abstract

Giant cell tumors of the larynx typically arise within the laryngeal skeleton. We report a case of a laryngeal tumor in a 29-year-old man that clearly originated outside the laryngeal cartilage. It was identified as a soft-tissue giant cell tumor. To the best of our knowledge, an extraskeletal laryngeal giant cell tumor has not been previously reported.

Rectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the larynx

March 31, 2011     Joseph Q. Ta, MD and John Y. Kim, MD
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Abstract

Malignancies metastatic to the larynx are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all laryngeal cancers with metastatic sources; the most common of these metastases are cutaneous melanomas and renal cell carcinomas. Only 13 cases of colon cancer and 2 cases of rectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the larynx have been previously reported in the literature. We report a new case of rectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the larynx that resulted in subglottic stenosis in a 60-year-old man. We also review the literature, and we discuss the presentations of and treatments for this rare entity.

Laryngeal Teflon granuloma: Endoscopy, laryngeal videostroboscopy, and CT imaging

March 1, 2011     Carlos M. Rivera-Serrano, MD and Libby J. Smith, DO
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Proton pump inhibitors: Adverse effects

December 17, 2010     Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS, Editor-in-Chief
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Most otolaryngologists are now aware of the importance and high incidence of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), especially in patients with voice complaints. Although many controversies remain regarding optimal diagnosis and treatment, long-term therapy with acid suppression is used commonly.

Laryngeal candidiasis

October 31, 2010     Venu Divi, MD, Reena Gupta, MD, Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS, and Parmis Pebdani, DO
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Laryngeal paraganglioma: Report of an unusual entity

October 31, 2010     Asim Kaytaz, MD, Emin Karaman, MD, Deniz Tuna Edizer, MD, Yusuf Haciyev, MD, and Buge Oz, MD
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Abstract

Paragangliomas are rare in the larynx. When they do occur there, the most common subsite is the supraglottic compartment. Unlike other neuroendocrine tumors of the larynx, laryngeal paragangliomas are three times as common in women as in men. Although a preoperative biopsy is often performed to establish the diagnosis, this procedure carries a considerable risk of bleeding, which may necessitate a tracheotomy to secure the airway. Immunohistochemical staining is useful in the differential diagnosis to distinguish a paraganglioma from other neuroendocrine tumors. Computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging with preoperative angiography and possible embolization are important to obtain prior to treatment. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice.

Laryngeal paraganglioma

September 30, 2010     Yoav Hahn, MD, Richard Isaacs, MD, and Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
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Recurrent vascular leiomyoma of the larynx: Clinical and histopathologic characteristics and treatment

July 31, 2010     Nir Hirshoren, MD, Jeffrey M. Weinberger, MD, FRCSC, Tzahi Neuman, MD, Ophir Ilan, MD, PhD, and Avraham Ben-Yaakov, MD
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Abstract

Laryngeal vascular leiomyomas are uncommon benign tumors that seldom recur following complete excision. The choice of excision procedure-via direct laryngoscopy or an open approach-is dictated by tumor size, the expected amount of blood loss, and any comorbidities the patient may have. We report an unusual case of a recurrent laryngeal vascular leiomyoma in a 64-year-old woman who also had a concurrent parathyroid adenoma and a history of breast carcinoma. A surgical resection via an external approach along with laser resection of a small glottic component was needed.

Seldinger technique for in-office tracheoesophageal puncture

July 31, 2010     Jacqui Allen, MBChB, FRACS and Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
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Anatomic changes related to laryngeal descent from birth to 1 year of age: Do they play a role in SIDS?

June 30, 2010     Robert E. Stephens, PhD, Austin Bancroft, DO, Alan G. Glaros, PhD, and Lisa H. Lowe, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to measure laryngeal descent in human infants and to determine if there is any correlation between the associated anatomic changes and the timing of the peak incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is 2 to 4 months of age. We performed a computerized search of hospital records at our institution to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head and neck and plain radiographs of the lateral neck in patients younger than 1 year of age (range: 1 to 357 days). After unusable images were excluded, 79 head and neck MRI scans and 111 lateral neck x-rays were suitable for study. Two measurements were taken from each image: one from the tip of the epiglottis to the uvula and one from the tip of the epiglottis to the center of the sella turcica. These measurements were then graphed against the subject's age. SPSS statistical software was used to determine growth curves of the various measurements. The first derivative of these curves was calculated to determine the rate of laryngeal descent at a given age. We found that most subjects did not have an overlapping epiglottis and uvula during the first few months of life. The rate of laryngeal descent, based on measurements of the distance between the epiglottis and uvula, gradually increased in a near-linear fashion from as low as 0.005726 mm/day at day 1 of life to as high as 0.028366 mm/day at 300 days of age. We found no sharp increase in the rate of descent at 2 to 4 months of age, and thus no support for our hypothesis that there might be a correlation between anatomic changes and the peak incidence of SIDS.

The challenge of rediscovering my voice after laryngectomy

June 30, 2010     Itzhak Brook MD, MSc
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I was shaken to my core 4 years ago when I was diagnosed with throat cancer. Even though my cancer was removed and I received local radiation, it recurred 20 months later. Unfortunately, my surgeons were unable to completely remove the tumor using laser, and I was left with no choice except to undergo laryngectomy. I faced the daunting realization that I could no longer continue to lecture and speak in public.

Laryngeal melanosis

May 31, 2010     James R. Tate, MD and Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
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