Tumor

Cervical sympathetic chain paraganglioma: A report of 2 cases and a literature review

March 18, 2014     Rahul Seth, MD; Manzoor Ahmed, MD; Aaron P. Hoschar, MD; Benjamin G. Wood, MD; Joseph Scharpf, MD
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Abstract

We review 2 cases of surgically and pathologically confirmed paraganglioma of the cervical sympathetic chain. Both patients-a 46-year-old man and a 33-year-old woman-were treated surgically. Intraoperatively, both tumors were found to be hypervascular and arising from the cervical sympathetic chain. Histopathologic analysis confirmed both as paragangliomas. Paragangliomas arising from the cervical sympathetic chain are exceptionally rare, but they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of parapharyngeal masses. They often present with ipsilateral Horner syndrome and oropharyngeal fullness, and they may be associated with a higher rate of catecholamine secretion. Typical imaging characteristics include anterolateral or lateral displacement of both the carotid and jugular vessels.

Two cases of granular cell tumors of the head and neck at different sites

March 18, 2014     Mustafa Paksoy, MD; Mehmet Eken, MD; Emin Ayduran, MD; Gokhan Altin, MD
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Abstract

Granular cell tumor (GCT) is an uncommon, primarily benign lesion. We describe 2 cases of GCT. Patient 1 was a 38-year-old man who presented with a reddish, vegetative lesion that involved the posterior third of the left true vocal fold. Patient 2 was an 18-year-old girl who presented with a firm, slightly extruded submucosal mass in the posterior lateral third of the tongue. Both lesions were identified as GCTs on biopsy. Both tumors were removed surgically, and both patients exhibited no signs of recurrence during follow-up. It is important that otolaryngologists be familiar with GCT and its management. Although the length of follow-up has varied substantially in the literature, we recommend long-term surveillance, including regular clinical examinations and periodic imaging with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, at least until additional studies have clarified the natural history and recurrence patterns of GCT with greater certainty.

Aggressive inflammatory pseudotumor of the maxillary sinus and orbit

March 18, 2014     Sheldon Chong, MBBS, MS(ORL-HNS); Carren S.L. Teh, MBBS, MS(ORL-HNS); Shashinder Singh, MBBS, FRACS; Mun Kein Seong, MBBS, MPath; Subrayan Viswaraja, MBBS, FRCS(Edin), FRCOphth(UK)
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Abstract

Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare, locally aggressive, benign neoplasm of unknown etiology. It is uncommon in the head and neck region, particularly in the paranasal sinuses. We present an unusual case of IPT of the maxillary sinus and orbit in a 27-year-old woman who presented with cheek swelling, right orbital swelling, double vision, and associated fever and trismus. Computed tomography identified a mass with radiologic features suggestive of a malignancy of the maxillary sinus and orbit; the mass extended into the infratemporal fossa, parapharyngeal space, anterior antral wall, and surrounding soft tissue. A diagnosis of IPT was established on the basis of histologic and immunohistochemical analysis, which identified a proliferation of bland spindle cells and a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate. Despite its aggressive appearance, IPT is associated with a good prognosis. Our patient was treated successfully with a combination of surgery, steroid therapy, and methotrexate. Chemotherapeutic agents are generally reserved for recalcitrant cases.

Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus: A clinicopathologic study of 5 cases

February 12, 2014     Hidenori Yokoi, MD, PhD; Atsushi Arakawa, MD, PhD; Fumihiko Matsumoto, MD, PhD; Naoko Yokoi, MD, PhD; Katsuhisa Ikeda, MD, PhD; and Naoyuki Kohno, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus is rare. Its pathogenesis is still not clear, and it appears to have multiple causes. We report the clinical, clinicopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings in 5 patients-3 men and 2 women, aged 19 to 68 years (mean: 40.2)-with pathologically proven organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. In all 5 cases, we were able to successfully perform curative treatment via endoscopic sinus surgery. Our findings suggest that most organized hematomas are angiomatous. Immunohistochemical analysis identified the presence of proliferative activity.

Osteochondroma of the nasal dorsum presenting as a nasal hump

February 12, 2014     Hakan Tutar, MD; Aykut Erdem Dinc, MD; Omer Uluoglu, MD; and Metin Yilmaz, MD
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Abstract

We describe the case of a 24-year-old man who underwent open septorhinoplasty for the treatment of progressive nasal disfigurement caused by a nasal hump. Postoperative histopathology of the resected hump revealed that it was an osteochondroma. The patient showed no evidence of recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of an osteochondroma involving the nasal dorsum to be reported in the English-language literature.

A case of bilateral internal auditory canal osteomas

January 21, 2014     Maria K. Brake, MD; David P. Morris, MD, FRCS(C); Jonathan Trites, MD, FRCS(C); S. Mark Taylor, MD, FRCS(C); Rene G. Van Wijhe, PhD; Robert D. Hart, MD, FRCS(C)
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Abstract

Osteomas of the skull base are rare, benign, slowly progressing growths of dense cortical bone. Osteomas occurring in the internal auditory canal are extremely rare. These lesions have sometimes been linked with dizziness, sensorineural hearing loss, and/or tinnitus. Although there have been documented cases in which surgical excision has improved these symptoms, symptomatic relief is not always achieved with surgical management. Here we pre-sent, to the best of our knowledge, only the third reported case of bilateral osteomas of the internal auditory canal. An 82-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of vertigo without a history of trauma or ear infection. She reported two similar episodes occurring a few years earlier, with symptoms persisting for only a few days. Audiometry showed presbycusis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging identified bilateral internal auditory canal osteomas. The patient was treated conservatively, monitored, and had complete resolution of her symptoms.

The endoscopic transnasal paraseptal approach to a sphenoid sinus osteoma: Case report and literature review

December 20, 2013     Frank Rikki Canevari, MD; Georgios Giourgos, MD; Andrea Pistochini, MD
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Abstract

Osteomas are the most common benign tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Their symptoms, which are nonspecific, occur as the result of a blocked nasal airflow or, in some rare cases, the involvement of nearby structures. Isolated sphenoid sinus osteomas are very rare, as only 20 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Most authors advise surgical treatment for symptomatic lesions. Surgical access to the sphenoid sinus has traditionally been a challenge for surgeons. We describe an endoscopic transnasal paraseptal resection of a sphenoid osteoma in a 35-year-old man. We also discuss surgical access and review the evolution of the surgical approaches to the sphenoid sinus.

Chronic facial pain and Meckel cave masses as the initial presentation of neurosarcoidosis: A case report

December 20, 2013     Graham M. Strub, PhD; Jaime E. Moore, MD; Andrew T. Huang, MD; Aaron W. Stevenson, MD; Evan R. Reiter, MD, FACS
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Abstract

Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease that can affect virtually every organ system, leading to a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Central nervous system involvement producing neurologic symptoms can occur in patients with sarcoidosis, yet rarely are these symptoms the initial manifestations of the disease. Here we present the case of a 38-year-old man who presented with a history of chronic facial pain, blurred vision, increased lacrimation, and periodontal abscesses. Physical examination revealed no evidence of infection or neoplasm. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed space-occupying lesions in Meckel cave bilaterally, with soft-tissue density extending into the left sphenoid and posterior ethmoid sinuses. Endoscopic biopsy of sinus mucosa demonstrated the presence of noncaseating granulomas and the absence of organisms, findings suggestive of neurosarcoidosis. The diagnosis was further supported by chest radiography, which demonstrated bilateral hilar adenopathy. The patient was treated with corticosteroids, and his facial pain improved markedly. In this article we discuss neurosarcoidosis and its manifestations, diagnosis, and clinical course.

Transglottic laryngeal paraganglioma: A rare location for this tumor

December 20, 2013     Secil Arslanoglu, MD; M. Zafer Uguz, MD; Demet Etit, MD; Murat Ermete, MD
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Abstract

Laryngeal paragangliomas are rare neoplasms that originate in the neural crest cells of the laryngeal paraganglia. Although the vast majority of these tumors are benign, they exhibit different types of biologic behavior that require different treatment modalities. Therefore, differentiation among these tumors is extremely important. We report a rare case of laryngeal paraganglioma that presented as a transglottic lesion in a 68-year-old man. The atypical location of the tumor led to difficulties in diagnosis and management. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third such case to be reported in the English-language literature.

A case and a series of published cases of esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) in which long-standing paraneoplastic SIADH had preceded ENB diagnosis

October 23, 2013     Uri Gabbay, MD, MPH; Leonor Leider-Trejo, MD; Gideon Marshak, MD; Merav Gabbay, MD; and Dan M. Fliss, MD
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Abstract

Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a rare tumor of the olfactory mucosa. We treated a 50-year-old man with an ENB in the right ethmoid sinus who had been diagnosed 16 years earlier with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) of unknown cause. When the ENB was surgically removed, the patient's osmoregulation returned to normal-that is, his SIADH resolved completely, which suggested that the SIADH was paraneoplastic in nature. These events prompted us to review the literature to determine if there is an association between our patient's ENB and his SIADH in general and between long-standing SIADH that precedes ENB in particular. Based on our review and an extrapolation of data, we have estimated that 1,300 cases of ENB have occurred since it was first described in 1924. Of these cases, SIADH was reported in 26 cases, including ours, which represents an estimated prevalence of 2% (although we believe this is actually an underestimation of the true prevalence). Of the 26 cases, SIADH had already been present in 14 patients (54%) prior to their diagnosis of EBN for a median duration of 3.5 years. We recommend that patients with newly diagnosed EBN be evaluated for SIADH. In those who are SIADH-positive, a resolution of SIADH should be expected once the ENB has been removed. If this does not occur, one should suspect that the ENB was not completely removed. If SIADH resolves but later recurs during follow-up, then a relapse should be suspected. In long-standing SIADH of unknown etiology, nasal sinus imaging should be considered.

Peripheral osteoma of the hard palate

August 21, 2013     Borlingegowda Viswanatha, MS, DLO, PhD
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Abstract

Peripheral osteomas of the hard palate are relatively rare. Two cases of osteoma of the hard palate are reported, along with a review of the literature.

Nasopharyngeal yolk sac tumors: A rare pediatric occurrence

August 21, 2013     Belinda Mantle, MD and Ryan F. Osborne, MD, FACS
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Symptoms of yolk sac tumors depend on the site affected. The characteristic finding is rapid growth over a few weeks.

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