Surgery

Endoscopic view of an ostium in a concha bullosa of the superior turbinate

October 17, 2014     Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS
article

A specific outflow tract or ostium of the superior turbinate, as was seen in this case, has been infrequently described or imaged.

Distal nasolacrimal duct showing the valve of Hasner

October 17, 2014     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

Recognition of the location of the nasolacrimal duct opening is important to prevent its damage while performing an intranasal inferior meatal antrostomy or creating a window transantrally in the inferior meatal wall during a Caldwell-Luc procedure.

A transoral surgical approach to a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma

October 17, 2014     Christopher Schutt, MD; Joehassin Cordero, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

It is relatively difficult to gain surgical access to pleomorphic adenomas of the parapharyngeal space. Since the lateral border is the mandible, gaining access to them can put several important neurovascular structures at risk. A number of surgical approaches have been developed to overcome this difficulty, and each has its advantages and disadvantages. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with a parapharyngeal-space pleomorphic adenoma that was accessed via a transoral approach. Transoral approaches are controversial and rarely used. However, we feel that for a selected group of tumors, this approach provides clear benefits by decreasing cosmetic and functional disability while providing good surgical access to the tumor.

Hypocalcemia after minimally invasive thyroidectomy

September 17, 2014     Doug Massick, MD; Matthew R. Garrett, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to determine the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia following minimally invasive thyroidectomy. During the 2-year study period, 74 patients-16 men and 58 women (mean age: 43.7)-underwent either total or hemithyroidectomy through a 3-cm incision. Postoperative hypocalcemia occurred in 14 of these patients (18.9%)-4 men and 10 women-all of whom underwent total rather than hemithyroidectomy. All these patients received supplementation with calcium and vitamin D for 2 weeks postoperatively in order to regain a normal calcium status, and all demonstrated normal serum calcium levels at 3 weeks. Despite their low calcium levels, none of the 14 patients exhibited any overt symptoms of hypocalcemia. We conclude that minimally invasive thyroidectomy is associated with a low rate of postoperative hypocalcemia that is comparable to the rates previously reported for standard thyroidectomy.

Comparative study of intranasal septal splints and nasal packs in patients undergoing nasal septal surgery

September 17, 2014     Raman Wadhera, MS; Naushad Zafar, MS; Sat Paul Gulati, MS; Vijay Kalra, MS; Anju Ghai, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a prospective, comparative, interventional study to evaluate the role of intranasal septal splints and to compare the results of this type of support with those of conventional nasal packing. Our study population was made up of 60 patients, aged 18 to 50 years, who had undergone septoplasty for the treatment of a symptomatic deviation of the nasal septum at our tertiary care referral hospital. These patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the type of nasal support they would receive: 30 patients (25 men and 5 women, mean age: 23.3 yr) received bilateral intranasal septal splints and the other 30 (26 men and 4 women, mean age: 22.4 yr) underwent anterior nasal packing. Outcomes parameters included postoperative pain and a number of other variables. At 24 and 48 hours postoperatively, the splint group had significantly lower mean pain scores (p < 0.05). At 48 hours, the splint group experienced significantly fewer instances of nasal bleeding (p < 0.01), swelling over the face and nose (p < 0.01), watering of the eyes (p < 0.01), nasal discharge (p = 0.028), nasal obstruction (p < 0.001), and feeding difficulty (p = 0.028). Likewise, mean pain scores during splint or pack removal were significantly lower in the splint group (p < 0.01). At the 6-week follow-up, only 2 patients (6.7%) in the splint group exhibited a residual deformity, compared with 8 patients (26.7%) in the packing group (p = 0.038). Finally, no patient in the splint group had an intranasal adhesion at follow-up, while 4 (13.3%) in the packing group did (p < 0.05). We conclude that intranasal septal splints result in less postoperative pain without increasing postoperative complications, and thus they can be used as an effective alternative to nasal packing after septoplasty.

Two cases of pyogenic granuloma in pregnancy

August 27, 2014     Alex Fernandez, MS; Jason Hamilton, MD, FACS; Raphael Nach, MD
article

Management and treatment of rhinologic issues in pregnant patients can be complex because of the limited availability of safety data.

Using a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to prevent postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy: A study of 88 cases

August 27, 2014     Masoud Naghibzadeh, MD; Ramin Zojaji, MD; Nematollah Mokhtari Amir Majdi, MD; Morteza Mazloum Farsi Baf, MD
article

Abstract

Complications of total laryngectomy can have serious implications for the final outcome of treatment, including pharyngocutaneous fistula. We conducted a retrospective study of surgical techniques to determine how to best prevent or decrease the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula following total laryngectomy. We reviewed the hospital records of all patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma at Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, from March 1989 through February 2005. We identified 88 such patients-80 men and 8 women. We divided this cohort into two groups according to the type of pharyngeal defect closure they received. A total of 37 patients-31 men and 6 women (mean age: 61.4 ± 5.9 yr) underwent primary closure along with a sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCMM) flap (flap group). The other 51 patients-49 men and 2 women (mean age: 61.3 ± 4.4 yr)-underwent standard primary closure without creation of an SCMM flap (nonflap group). Overall, postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula occurred in 9 of the 88 patients (10.2%)-1 case in the flap group (2.7%) and 8 cases in the nonflap group (15.7%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 0.612, 95% confidence interval = 0.451 to 0.832), independent of other factors. We found no correlation between fistula development and age (p = 0.073), sex (p = 0.065), or tumor location (p = 0.435). Likewise, we found no correlation between tumor location and either sex (p = 0.140) or age (p = 0.241). We conclude that including an SCMM flap in the surgical process would significantly decrease the development of fistula, regardless of age, sex, and tumor site.

Balloon sinus dilation in the office setting

August 27, 2014     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Michael A. Munier, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas Jr., MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

The ability to complete operative procedures in the office setting avoids the time and cost of working in a hospital or outpatient surgical center operating room.

Transoral robotic surgery and oropharyngeal cancer: A literature review

August 27, 2014     Paraig O'Leary, MD; Thomas Kjaergaard, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has risen steadily over the past decade due to the increase in cancers associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). The prognosis for the treatment of this type of cancer with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy is good. However, because these treatments can have detrimental effects on organ function and quality of life, researchers are looking into transoral robotic surgery (TORS) as a possible alternate therapy. TORS might have a positive effect on postoperative function and quality of life for cancer survivors. The aim of this review is to report on the current situation regarding the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer with TORS, with a focus on the long-term oncologic and functional outcomes of this strategy. The articles cited in this review were selected from the PubMed and MEDLINE database. They contain study results pertaining to TORS implementation, complications, oncologic and functional outcomes, and the implications of HPV-associated cancer. We found that while TORS has some clear advantages and strengths and almost certainly a permanent place in future treatment, further research is necessary to correctly evaluate the role it will play in the complete management of oropharyngeal cancer.

Anatomic measurements of the anterior and posterior ethmoid arteries in cadaveric heads using endoscopic sinus instrumentation

May 7, 2014     Zeeshan S. Aziz, MD; Ninef E. Zaya, MD; Richard M. Bass, MD
article

Abstract

The challenges of endoscopic sinus surgery lie in the complexity of the anatomy of the nasal vault and side walls and the proximity to critical structures. Additionally, operating in a three-dimensional space while relying on a two-dimensional image for surgical navigation can be a disorienting task. Successful sinus surgery relies on the surgeon having a clear understanding of the anatomy and relationships within the operative field. We performed a study of 8 adult cadaveric heads to better elucidate the location of the ethmoid arteries in relation to an accessible external landmark, the nasal sill. Sinus endoscopy was performed on the heads to identify and measure the distance from the nasal sill to the anterior and posterior ethmoid arteries. We found that the distance from the nasal sill to the anterior ethmoid artery was approximately 6.0 cm, and the distance to the posterior ethmoid artery was approximately 6.7 cm. The interarterial distance was approximately 1.2 cm. With a better understanding of these vessels, surgeons will be better able to avoid them during surgery and thereby minimize the risk of excessive intraoperative bleeding and perioperative orbital hematoma.

Retropharyngeal pseudoabscess manifesting in nephrotic syndrome

May 7, 2014     Shirish Johari, DLO, MRCSEd, DOHNS(Edin); Pankaj Handa, MD, MRCP(Ire), FAMS; Jin Keat Siow, MD, MBBS, FRCSEd
article

Abstract

We describe a case of nephrotic syndrome that manifested as a retropharyngeal pseudoabscess. The patient was a 32-year-old man who presented with a short history of throat discomfort and a choking sensation. Laryngoscopy identified bulging of the posterior pharyngeal wall that partially occluded the laryngeal inlet. A lateral neck x-ray revealed that the prevertebral space was widened, and computed tomography detected fluid in the retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal spaces. Neck exploration revealed that the edema had been caused by nonsuppurative fluid. Biochemical analyses revealed marked hypoalbuminemia and heavy proteinuria suggestive of nephrotic syndrome. Following surgery, the patient's symptoms resolved. Aseptic effusion into the retropharyngeal space is rare; reported etiologies include internal jugular vein thrombosis, neoplasia, radiation therapy, trauma, acute calcific tendinitis, hereditary angioedema, and myxedema of hypothyroidism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of nephrotic syndrome initially manifesting as retropharyngeal pseudoabscess to be reported in the literature. Thrombotic occlusion of the pharyngeal venous plexus secondary to hypercoagulability is a plausible explanation for such isolated retropharyngeal effusion.

Nasal valve surgery: Assessment of quality of life with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory

May 7, 2014     Jaiganesh Manickavasagam, MRCS(Edin), DOHNS(Lond); Smeeta Wong, MRCS; Veronika Varabei, MBBS; Ullas Raghavan, FRCS(ORL)
article

Abstract

We used the 18-question Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) to conduct a retrospective assessment of quality of life following nasal valve surgery. We telephoned 53 patients who had undergone open rhinoplasty for the treatment of nasal valve collapse over a 2-year period. A total of 39 patients-24 men and 15 women, aged 20 to 50 years (mean: 38)-agreed to participate and answer the questions. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months (mean: 8). The spectrum of possible GBI scores ranges from -100 (maximum negative outcome) to 0 (no change) to +100 (maximum benefit); in our group, the median total score was +56 (interquartile range: +32 to +90.5) and the overall total score was +58. The three subscale components of the GBI-general benefit, physical benefit, and social benefit-were analyzed individually; the respective median scores were +46 (+21 to +71), +67 (+25 to +91.5), and +50 (+17 to +100), and the respective overall scores were +60, +59, and +50. Based on these findings, we conclude that nasal valve surgery significantly improves quality of life.

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