Sinusitis

Endoscopic view of sphenoid fungal sinusitis

March 1, 2005     Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

Bacteriology in patients with chronic sinusitis who have been medically and surgically treated

December 1, 2004     Altan Yildirim, MD; Charles Oh, MD; Hakan Erdem, MD; Tanfer Kunt, MD
article
Abstract
Chronic sinusitis is a disease that afflicts a significant percentage of the population and causes considerable long-term morbidity. The common use of multiple broad-spectrum oral antibiotics and endoscopic sinus surgery to treat this condition may alter the pathogenes that promote persistence of chronic sinusitis. Forty-eight culture-positive patients with chronic sinusitis who had been medically treated for at least 3 months and had undergone sinus surgery were bacteriologically evaluated. Swab specimens of the middle meatus and sphenoethmoid recess were aseptically obtained endoscopically and cultured for aerobes. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common isolates (45.8%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (16.7%), Enterobacteriaceae (16.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (10.4%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.4%). Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated organisms in our study, as in many other studies. Despite the significant predominance of these organisms, they have always been assumed to be contaminants, and their presence in culture has been discounted. Coagulase-negative S aureus may be a pathogen in the chronic sinusitis process, and sensitivities of this isolate should be obtained for evaluation and possible treatment of the disease.

Fluconazole nasal spray in the treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis: A pilot study

September 30, 2004     Albert Jen, MD; Ashutosh Kacker, MD; Clark Huang, MD; Vijay Anand, MD
article
Abstract
The authors describe a prospective pilot study designed to investigate the use of topical nasal antifungal spray in addition to systemic steroids and itraconazole in the treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis. Sixteen patients with a history of allergic fungal sinusitis were given fluconazole nasal spray and followed for 3 months. Stabilization or improvement of disease without significant side effects was observed in 12 of the 16 patients who were treated with this protocol. These results indicate that topical fluconazole application may help patients with allergic fungal sinusitis; however, a larger multicenter study with longer patient follow-up is required to validate these initial findings.
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