Osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis of the temporal bone in identical twin infants

June 13, 2011     Sampath C. Prasad, MS, DNB, Kishore Chandra Prasad, DLO, MS, FACS, Rukma Bhandary, DLO, MS, Kumar Abhijith, MS, and Pallavi Sampath, DNB
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Abstract

Osteomyelitis of the skull base almost always occurs in elderly patients with diabetes; however, it may occur in patients with compromised immune function regardless of their age. We present the cases of a pair of immunocompetent, 2-year-old identical twins who experienced osteomyelitis of the temporal bone almost exactly 1 year apart. An incident such as this, in this age group, has never been reported in the literature.

Skull base osteomyelitis originating in the middle ear or mastoid: A review of 3 cases

March 1, 2011     Aaron Pang, MBBS, MRCS(Edin) and Kevin Chong, MBBS, FRCS(Edin)
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Abstract

Skull base osteomyelitis is a life-threatening condition that sometimes arises as a sequela of otitis media and mastoiditis. We present a retrospective analysis of the clinical course of 3 patients with skull base osteomyelitis that originated in the middle ear or mastoid. All 3 patients were elderly diabetic men who presented with headache. We review the clinical features, radiologic findings, and culture results in all 3 cases, and we describe the treatment regimens that led to a successful response in all 3 patients.

Osteomyelitis of the hard palate secondary to actinomycosis: A case report

March 1, 2011     Rohit Garg, MD, Paul Schalch, MD, Jon-Paul Pepper, MD, and Quoc A. Nguyen, MD
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Abstract

Osteomyelitis of the hard palate is a rare and difficult-to-eradicate sequela of actinomycosis. In this case report, we illustrate the necessity of aggressive surgical management of actinomycotic infection of the hard palate. The patient was initially treated with multiple local debridements supplemented with oral and then parenteral antibiotics, but his disease progressively worsened. His condition eventually resolved only after a partial palatectomy was performed to remove all the necrotic bone, followed by a prolonged course of intravenous and oral antibiotic treatment.

Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the skull mimicking osteomyelitis

January 1, 2011     Egambaram Senthilvel, MD, Shanmugam Subbiah, MD, Vikas Jain, MD, and Michael Seidman, MD
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Abstract

Primary lymphomas of the skull are extremely rare, as fewer than 20 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with Huntington chorea who presented with forehead swelling. Imaging studies detected an enhancing mass in the skull with some destruction of the underlying bone. These features were suggestive of osteomyelitis. Surgical excision was performed, and the mass was found to be a primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was administered postoperative chemotherapy, and she was in complete remission at the 1-year follow-up.

Paget disease and chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible

March 31, 2010     Hootan Zandifar, MD, Jason S. Hamilton, MD, Ryan F. Osborne, MD, Ron E. Walsh, NP, and Robert M. Kellman, MD
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Nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess complicated by cervical osteomyelitis and epidural abscess in post-Katrina New Orleans: Four cases

June 30, 2009     Sabeen Faruqui, MS, Enrique Palacios, MD, Paul Friedlander, MD, Miguel Melgar, MD, PhD, Jorge Alvernia, MD, and Phillip Vaughan Parry, MD
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Abstract

Most retropharyngeal abscesses, including iatrogenic cases, are caused by trauma. Nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscesses usually occur secondary to infection of the retropharyngeal lymph nodes. Because these particular nodes usually disappear by the age of 4 or 5 years, a nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess in an adult is extremely rare. When they do occur in adults, they are generally seen in immunocompromised patients and in intravenous drug abusers. Left untreated, a retropharyngeal abscess can lead to rare and fatal complications such as cervical osteomyelitis, epidural abscess, and discitis. Retropharyngeal abscesses can be diagnosed with a thorough history of risk factors, an examination for neurologic deficits, and radiologic studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment involves intravenous antibiotic therapy and surgical drainage. During follow-up, it is important to closely monitor the results of clinical neurologic examinations and weekly determinations of the C-reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in order to assess the response to therapy. We report 4 cases of nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess complicated by cervical osteomyelitis and epidural abscess that were seen in New Orleans within 3 years of Hurricane Katrina, which struck the U.S. Gulf Coast in August 2005.

Iatrogenic occipital osteomyelitis

January 1, 2009     Gleb Medvedev, BS, Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR, and Wesley Jones, MD
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Severe muscle spasm of the neck secondary to osteomyelitis of the atlantoaxial joint

June 30, 2007     Jagan D. Gupta, MD; Matthew Dang, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
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Osteomyelitis

November 1, 2005     Francis H. Gannon, MD; Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Unusual rhinosinusitis caused by Curvularia fungi

April 30, 2005     Pedram Parva, MD; Rafael Rojas, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR
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Sequelae of undiagnosed cervical vertebral osteomyelitis in intravenous drug abusers

August 31, 2004     Helen X. Xu, MD; Ryan F. Osborne, MD; Jason Hamilton, MD; Lorenzo Brown, MD
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