Mass

Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint

July 21, 2013     Helen Giannakopoulos, DDS, MD; Joli C. Chou, DMD, MD; Peter D. Quinn, DMD, MD
article

Abstract

Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a proliferative disorder that affects synovium-lined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. It appears in both diffuse and localized forms, depending on the extent of synovial involvement. PVNS rarely involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ); when it does, it manifests clinically as a slowly growing and painless preauricular mass that resembles a parotid tumor. TMJ dysfunction, paresthesia, and/or hearing loss can result. We present a case of a large extra-articular PVNS of the TMJ, and we review the literature.

Infected sublingual hematoma: A rare complication of frenulectomy

July 21, 2013     Amal Isaiah, MD, DPhil; Kevin D. Pereira, MD, MS
article

Given the spectrum of potential poor outcomes, some consensus has emerged in favor of early surgical management of significant ankyloglossia.

Mucocele: Retention and extravasation types

March 24, 2013     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

The extravasation type is the most common mucocele, more common in children and young adults, with a peak in the second decade of life.

Hypopharyngeal lipoma causing obstructive sleep apnea: Discovery on dental cone-beam CT

March 24, 2013     Ashok Balasundaram, BDS, DDS, MDS, MS, Diplomate ABOMR
article

Abstract

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is primarily used for a variety of dental purposes, but it may also yield nondental findings that can have significant implications for patient health. For example, physicians should be aware that CBCT can identify some of the etiopathogenic causes of obstructive sleep apnea, as occurred in the case described in this report. The patient was a 76-year-old man who presented to a dentist for implant therapy. A CBCT that had been performed in preparation for dental implant placement revealed the presence of a large hypopharyngeal lesion that was obstructing the airway. An otolaryngologist excised the lesion, which on biopsy proved to be a lipoma. Following removal of the lesion, the patient's episodic sleep apnea and snoring resolved. Medical physicians should be aware of maxillofacial CBCT technology and its ability to identify lesions that could cause potential life-threatening situations.

External auditory canal exostosis

January 24, 2013     Joseph A. Ursick, MD; Jose N. Fayad, MD
article

Exostoses, composed of immature layers of lamellar bone that cause a progressive stenosis of the external ear canal, are typically bilateral, occur at suture lines, and are associated with repeated exposure to cold water.

Pilomatricoma of the pinna

January 24, 2013     Aroor Rajeshwary, MS (ENT); Gangadhara Somayaji, MS (ENT); Sai Manohar, MS (ENT)
article

Abstract

A 4-year-old boy presented with a painless swelling over the right pinna of 4 months' duration. Histopathologic examination of the excised mass revealed features of pilomatricoma-a rare, benign skin neoplasm arising from hair follicle matrix cells. The unusual location of the lesion over the pinna, despite its frequent occurrence in the head and neck, prompted this article. We discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, and management of pilomatricoma of the auricular region

Castleman disease of the neck: An uncommon location

January 24, 2013     Lorena Garza Garcia, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Alexander Quiroz-Casian, MD; Harold Neitzschman, MD, FACR
article

Patients with the hyaline vascular variant of Castleman disease tend to be asymptomatic, although some have complained of symptoms caused by compression of adjacent structures, and others have reported a palpable mass.

Ectopic thymus presenting as a retropharyngeal mass: Surgical approach

January 24, 2013     Abby R. Nolder, MD; Amit Agarwal, MD; Emily Howard, MD, PhD; Gresham T. Richter, MD
article

Abstract

Cervical ectopic thymus is a rare cause of solid neck masses in children. Most children are asymptomatic, but some may present with a palpable neck mass, with or without compressive symptoms. Cervical ectopic thymus is often discovered incidentally and mistaken for an infection or neoplasm. We present the case of an infant with retropharyngeal ectopic thymus and describe our intraoral surgical approach.

Intraoperative view of a glomus tympanicum

December 31, 2012     Waitsz T. Chang, MRCS; Willis S.S. Tsang, FRCSEd(ORL)
article

For the treatment of a small glomus tympanicum, surgical excision via an anterior tympanotomy approach is possible.

Sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma with intracranial extension: Case report and literature review

December 31, 2012     Shafik N. Wassef, MD; Payal Kapur, MBBS, MD; Samuel L. Barnett, MD; Larry L. Myers, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

Sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma (SNTCS) is an extremely rare malignancy of the paranasal sinuses that possesses the histopathologic features of both teratomas and carcinosarcomas. We report the case of a 58-year-old white man who presented with a 1-year history of a gradually enlarging left-sided nasal mass. The patient had previously undergone endoscopic sinus surgery at another facility, and the final pathologic specimen was reported as an SNTCS with positive margins. He was then referred to our institution, where he underwent a craniofacial resection combined with endoscopic intranasal resection. Postoperatively, he received combined chemotherapy and irradiation. At 48 months of follow-up, he was alive without evidence of disease.

Intraparotid arterial aneurysm treated with embolization followed by surgical resection

December 31, 2012     Daniel T. Ganc, MD; Charles Prestigiacomo, MD; Soly Baredes, MD
article

Abstract

We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman who presented to a local facial plastic surgeon for evaluation of a cosmetic defect of the cheek of 1 month's duration. When imaging revealed the presence of a vascular mass, the patient was referred to us. Further imaging identified the mass as an intraparotid external carotid artery aneurysm. The decision was then made to treat the patient with embolization of the lesion followed by surgical resection the next day. During the resection, the lateral-most aspect of the aneurysm was found to be adherent to and splaying the facial nerve. The embolized mass and the surrounding fascial layer were removed, and the branches of the facial nerve were retracted superiorly and inferiorly. Dissection proceeded around the aneurysm in this plane. Blood loss during the procedure was minimal. On postoperative day 1, the patient exhibited minimal lower facial asymmetry. In this case, performing embolization prior to surgical resection appeared to be a prudent and efficacious strategy. The preoperative embolization greatly reduced the risk of damage to the facial nerve.

Cervical thoracic duct cyst: Importance of preoperative suspicion for appropriate management of left-sided neck mass

December 31, 2012     Matthew T. Gill, MD; Timothy S. Lian, MD; Joel D. Thibodeaux, MD; Cherie-Ann O. Nathan, MD, FACS
article

Abstract

Cervical thoracic duct cysts occur infrequently but are an important consideration when evaluating cystic supraclavicular masses. Only 22 cases have been reported to date. We review the clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of 2 cases of large thoracic duct cysts treated with surgical resection. A high suspicion of thoracic duct cyst based on location, radiographic findings, and fine-needle aspiration results is sufficient evidence for recommendation of surgical excision. However, enlarged cysts, as noted in our cases, can obliterate or attenuate the thoracic duct, making it difficult to identify intraoperatively. A high suspicion of thoracic duct cyst is important for identifying and ligating the duct to prevent complications such as chyle leak or chylothorax.

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