Infection

Mucormycosis (Mucor fungus ball) of the maxillary sinus

October 17, 2014     Hang Sun Cho, MD; Hoon Shik Yang, MD, PhD; Kyung Soo Kim, MD, PhD
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Abstract

A fungus ball is an extramucosal fungal proliferation that completely fills one or more paranasal sinuses and usually occurs as a unilateral infection. It is mainly caused by Aspergillus spp in an immunocompetent host, but some cases of paranasal fungal balls reportedly have been caused by Mucor spp. A Mucor fungus ball is usually found in the maxillary sinus and/or the sphenoid sinus and may be black in color. Patients with mucormycosis, or a Mucor fungal ball infection, usually present with facial pain or headache. On computed tomography, there are no pathognomonic findings that are conclusive for a diagnosis of mucormycosis. In this article we report a case of mucormycosis in a 56-year-old woman and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the “Mucor fungus ball.” To the best of our knowledge, 5 case reports (8 patients) have been published in which the fungus ball was thought to be caused by Mucor spp.

A rare occurrence of a fungus ball in the sphenoethmoid recess

October 17, 2014     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD; Ha-Min Jeong, MD
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A fungus ball usually appears as a calcification within the sinus, suggesting the presence of a foreign body.

Primary laryngeal tuberculosis: An unusual cause of hoarseness

October 17, 2014     Peter Fsadni, MD, MRCP(UK); Claudia Fsadni, MD, MRCP(UK), MSc(Lond); Brendan Caruana Montaldo, MD, FACP
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Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) of the larynx is usually associated with concomitant pulmonary TB, but approximately 20% of cases represent primary disease. We report the case of an 85-year-old woman with asthma who presented with a 6-month history of persistent hoarseness. Bronchoscopy confirmed the presence of a lesion in the hemilarynx, and histology identified tuberculoid granulomas that were suggestive of TB. Treatment with a combination of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol led to a complete resolution of symptoms. A high index of suspicion for laryngeal TB is required in patients who present with hoarseness.

Bilateral nontuberculous mycobacterial middle ear infection: A rare case

September 17, 2014     Ing Ping Tang, MS; Shashinder Singh, MS; Raman Rajagopalan, MS
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Abstract

Nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) middle ear infection is a rare cause of chronic bilateral intermittent otorrhea. We report a rare case of bilateral NTM middle ear infection in which a 55-year-old woman presented with intermittent otorrhea of 40 years' duration. The patient was treated medically with success. We conclude that NTM is a rare but probably under-recognized cause of chronic otitis media. A high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis to avoid prolonged morbidity. Treatment includes surgical clearance of infected tissue with appropriate antimycobacterial drugs, which are selected based on culture and sensitivity.

Non-otogenic lateral sinus thrombosis: A complication of acute sphenoid sinusitis

August 27, 2014     Jessica M. Somerville, MD; Erik Lyman, MD; Jerome W. Thompson, MD, MBA; Rosemary Stocks, MD, PharmD
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Abstract

The consequences of intracranial spread of sinus infection can be dismal. The subtle presentation of sphenoid sinusitis often leads to a delay in diagnosis. The disease may go unrecognized until complications are severe enough to cause more localizing symptoms. Often infections in the head and neck spread into the cranial cavity, leading to a localized effect. For example, otogenic infections can spread to the mastoid or lateral venous sinus. We report a case of sphenoid sinusitis complicated by lateral and sigmoid venous sinus thrombosis.

Otologic manifestation of Samter triad

July 13, 2014     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Senja Tomovic, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
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It is important for otolaryngologists to be aware of the mucoid quality of these middle ear effusions, as they tend to be persistent and they do not respond well to myringotomy and tube placement, which usually results in tube obstruction.

Invasive primary aspergillosis of the larynx presenting as hoarseness and a chronic nonhealing laryngeal ulcer in an immunocompetent host: A rare entity

July 13, 2014     Mimi Gangopadhyay, MD; Kaushik Majumdar, MD; Arghya Bandyopadhyay, MD; and Anup Ghosh, MS(ENT)
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Abstract

Primary aspergillosis usually affects the paranasal sinuses, orbit, ear, and lower respiratory tract. Laryngeal aspergillosis usually occurs as a result of secondary invasion from the tracheobronchial tree, more commonly in immunocompromised hosts. Primary laryngeal localization of Aspergillus infection is seldom encountered. We report the case of an immunocompetent 42-year-old man who presented with hoarseness and a laryngeal ulcer of fairly long duration. A malignancy was initially suspected clinically, but a laryngoscopic biopsy led to a diagnosis of invasive primary laryngeal aspergillosis. No other focus of aspergillosis was found on x-ray and computed tomography. After identification of Aspergillus niger on culture, inquiries revealed no exposure to steroids, cytotoxic drugs, or irradiation, and workups for malignancy, human immunodeficiency virus infection, tuberculosis, and diabetes were negative. Although isolated laryngeal involvement is rare, aspergillosis may be considered in the differential diagnosis of a chronic nonhealing laryngeal ulcer that is clinically suggestive of a malignancy, even in an immunocompetent host.

Rhinosporidiosis: An unusual presentation

July 13, 2014     Borlingegowda Viswanatha, MS, DLO, PhD
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Abstract

Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease that primarily affects the mucous membranes of the nose and nasopharynx. It is caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi. Clinically it presents as a reddish, bleeding, polypoid mass with a characteristic strawberry-like appearance on its surface, which is caused by the presence of mature sporangia. In the case described here, a 35-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of a slowly growing polypoid mass in his left nasal cavity. The surface of the mass was smooth, pale, and covered with nasal mucosa. It was attached to the nasal septum. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of a parasitic cyst. The mass was excised with the use of local anesthesia. Histopathologic examination of the resected specimen revealed rhinosporidiosis. Prior to this diagnosis, the patient had not exhibited most of the typical clinical features that are suggestive of rhinosporidiosis. In the case of a nasal mass, a diagnosis of rhinosporidiosis is important to establish prior to any surgery because bleeding during and after surgery is usually profuse and can be life-threatening. The site of the excised mass should be cauterized to prevent recurrence.

Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of ENT infections in a tropical hospital

June 8, 2014     Yok Kuan Chew, MBBS; Jack Pein Cheong, MBBS; Nambiar Ramesh, MBBS; Mohamad Din Noorafidah, MPath; Sushil Brito-Mutunayagam, MS; Abdullah Khir, MS; Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective observational study to determine the spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of organisms isolated in otorhinolaryngologic (ORL) infections. We reviewed the laboratory culture and sensitivity records of 4,909 patients-2,773 males (56.5%) and 2,136 females (43.5%), aged 2 to 90 years (mean: 45.3 ± 12.6)-who had been seen at two government hospitals in Malaysia. Of this group, 4,332 patients had a respiratory tract infection (88.2%), 206 had an ear infection (4.2%), 188 had a deep neck infection (3.8%), and 183 had an oropharyngeal infection (3.7%). The most common isolated organisms were Klebsiella spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible S aureus, coagulase-negative S aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We also identified the antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms. We conclude that since the spectrum of causative pathogens in some infections differs between tropical and nontropical areas of the world, tropical hospitals should not completely adopt the antibiotic guidelines for ORL infections that have been recommended for hospitals in nontropical regions. We hope that our review and analysis of local data will help practitioners in Malaysia develop an appropriate prescribing policy with respect to ORL pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility. The goal is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

Condyloma acuminatum of the buccal mucosa

June 8, 2014     Rashmi Jaiswal, PhD; Manoj Pandey, MS; Mridula Shukla, DipNB; Mohan Kumar, MD
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Abstract

Condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced disease. It is usually transmitted sexually, and it frequently occurs in the anogenital area. A finding of condyloma acuminatum in the oral cavity is rare. Besides HPV, other risk factors for oral condyloma include chewing betel quid and smoking. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a 2 x 2-cm verrucous white patch on his buccal mucosa. He was habituated to both betel quid and cigarette smoking. A biopsy of the lesion identified it as a verrucous hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium with HPV-related koilocytic changes. The lesion was excised, and further histopathology identified it as condyloma acuminatum. The patient was disease-free 9 months postoperatively. The possibility of condyloma acuminatum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an oral white lesion. The most common treatments are surgical excision, cryosurgery, electrocautery, and laser excision. There is no known role for antiviral therapy.

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: A conservative approach

March 18, 2014     Sriram Iyer, MRCP; Joseph Collum, MRCP; Marta Babores, FRCP
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Abstract

Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a now-rare complication of dental and pharyngeal infections. Reports in the literature have emphasized the need for early, aggressive surgical intervention. We present a case of DNM with bilateral empyemas that arose secondary to a perforated pharyngeal abscess. The patient was successfully managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics and intercostal drainage. We conclude that conservative management with antibiotics and image-guided percutaneous pleural drainage may be initially appropriate for the stable patient.

Fungal necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in 3 patients with uncontrolled diabetes

March 18, 2014     Saravanam Prasanna Kumar, DNB; Arunachalam Ravikumar, MS; Lakshmanan Somu, MS
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Abstract

Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive soft-tissue infection that is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. It is usually caused by bacteria and rarely caused by or complicated by a fungus. We report 3 cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. Fungi were isolated in all 3 cases. In 1 fatal case, the invasive zygomycete Apophysomyces elegans was isolated. Keys to the management of this condition are (1) early isolation of the causative organism by fungal smear and culture, (2) adequate control of diabetes, (3) maintenance of electrolyte balance, and (4) controlled aggressive surgical debridement at an early stage. We emphasize the importance of fungal smears and cultures in the management of this rapidly spreading infection.

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