Foreign Body

Pediatric nasal septal perforation secondary to magnet misuse: A case report

October 31, 2007     Carl Shermetaro, DO, FAOCO and Melissa Charnesky, DO
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Abstract

We describe the case of a 7-year-old girl who had placed magnetic earrings bilaterally on her nasal ala. However, the two backing magnets that had been placed inside the nasal cavity became attached to each other rather than to the outer jewelry, compressing the nasal septum. Several weeks later, the septum became perforated. The patient was treated conservatively with mupirocin ointment, oral amoxicillin, and nasal saline. Subsequent examinations revealed no enlargement of the perforation, and the patient was followed conservatively with saline nasal spray.

An impacted fish bone in the subglottis manifesting as protracted stridor: Photodocumentation

April 30, 2007     Omar Rahmat, MS; Wye Keat Lim, FRCS; Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS
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Irreversible hydrocolloid: An unusual presentation of esophageal obstruction

March 1, 2007     Sihun Alex Kim, MD; Robert J. Meleca, MD
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Aspirated tracheobronchial foreign bodies: A Jordanian experience

February 1, 2007     Tareq Mahafza, FRCS; Yousef Khader, ScD
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Report of an unusual cause of rhinolithiasis: An 'opioma'

January 1, 2007     Hadi Ghanbari, MD; Mohammad Farhadi, MD; Ahmad Daneshi, MD
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Perforating and migrating pharyngoesophageal foreign bodies: A series of 5 patients

August 31, 2006     Khalid Al-Sebeih, MD, FRCSC; Miloslav Valvoda, MD; Amro Sobeih, MD; Mutlaq Al-Sihan, MD
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Abstract
Ingestion of a foreign body is a problem seen in nearly all otolaryngologic practices. One of the least common complications of foreign-body ingestion is penetration and migration, which may lead to serious morbidity or even death. We report the findings of a retrospective review of a series of 5 patients who had presented with a complete foreign-body penetration. All of them had radiologic evidence of a foreign body, but findings on rigid endoscopy were negative. Computed tomography is the radiologic study of choice to identify penetrating foreign bodies. The foreign bodies in all 5 patients were extracted via an external approach.

The submucosal fish bone

July 31, 2006     Patrick M. Spielmann, MBChB, MRCS (Edin); Conroy Howson, FCS (SA) ORL
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A french-fried foreign body

May 31, 2006     Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
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An unusual cause of nasal obstruction: A hair clip in the nasopharynx

April 1, 2006     Sandeep Berry, MRCS; Huey Tay, FRCS
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Retained hypodermic needles in the neck

March 1, 2006     Michael J. Rodriguez, MD; Simon Angeli, MD
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Pediatric foreign body and an unusual x-ray finding

February 1, 2006     Bart Patenaude, MD; Steven Chase, MD; Marcella Bothwell, MD
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Impacted pharyngeal fish bone migrating to the retropharynx

November 1, 2005     David A. Lehman, MD; Frank C. Astor, MD; Soham Roy, MD
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