Foreign Body

Extramedullary plasmacytoma associated with an ectopic tooth in the nasal cavity

October 30, 2015     Yi Zhang, MD; Yong Xu, MD; Yu Xu, MD; Zezhang Tao, MD


Extramedullary plasmacytoma and tooth eruption into the nasal cavity are both rare events. We report a case of plasmacytoma associated with an ectopic tooth. To the best of our knowledge, such a case has not been previously reported in the literature. A 63-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an 8-month history of a bloody nasal discharge from the posterior naris. Nasal endoscopy detected a slight eminence approximately 0.5 cm in diameter in the right nasal floor. Computed tomography demonstrated a tooth-like, high-attenuation shadow. A biopsy identified chronic inflammation of the mucosa and tissue. A diagnosis of an ectopic tooth in the right nasal cavity was initially considered. The mass and the tooth-like neoplasm were removed via nasal endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry of the excised mucosa showed strong positivity for kappa light chains, positivity for leukocyte common antigen and CD138, and negativity for lambda light chains, epithelial membrane antigen, CD1, and HMB-45. The final diagnosis was an extramedullary plasmacytoma in the right nasal cavity associated with an ectopic tooth. No bone metastasis was observed. Definitive radiotherapy was performed after the operation. During 40 months of follow-up, the patient exhibited no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis. The diagnosis in this case was made difficult by the nonspecific clinical manifestations, the presence of the ectopic tooth, and incorrect interpretation of preoperative histopathology. Physicians should maintain a clinical suspicion for the possibility that an ectopic tooth might be associated with a tumor.

Rhinolith from a long-ago insertion of a bead into the nasal cavity

September 20, 2015     Hung-Che Lin, MD; Chih-Hung Wang, MD, PhD; Hsin-Chien Chen, MD, PhD

CT may be used to assess the calcification deposits and the number and size of rhinoliths.

A radiologic view of migration of a foreign body in the maxillary sinus by mucociliary movement

September 20, 2015     Jae Hoon Lee, MD

Displaced foreign objects should be removed from the antrum to prevent the development of maxillary sinusitis.

Use of fluoroscopic guidance to remove a migrating esophageal foreign body

June 4, 2015     Ramanuj Sinha, MS; Utpal Jana, MS; Soumya Ghatak, MS; Gautam Biswas, MS; Jayanta Saha, MS; Indranil Sen, MS


Ingested foreign bodies that migrate extraluminally are rare. In such cases, exploration of the neck via an external approach is the recommended procedure to remove the object. However, locating such a foreign body can be a difficult task. We report what we believe is the first adult case of fluoroscopically guided localization of an accidentally ingested foreign body that had migrated into the soft tissues of the neck. We also review the other methods used to locate a migrating foreign body.

The harm of ham hocks: Foreign body impaction in long-standing multiple sclerosis

March 2, 2015     Anish Patel, MD; Jacqueline Weinstein, MD; Mandy Weidenhaft, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR

The incidence of foreign body impaction in neurologic dysfunctional swallowing, such as in multiple sclerosis (MS), has been not widely reported.

Minimally invasive drainage of a posterior mediastinal abscess through the retropharyngeal space: A report of 2 cases

March 2, 2015     Dan Lu, MD; Yu Zhao, MD, PhD


Foreign-body ingestion is a common cause of esophageal perforation, which can lead to a fatal posterior mediastinal abscess. Routine treatments include the drainage of pus through the esophageal perforation, thoracotomy, and videothoracoscopic drainage. We present 2 cases of posterior mediastinal abscess caused by esophageal perforation. Both patients-a 44-year-old woman and an 80-year-old man-were successfully treated with a novel, minimally invasive approach that involved draining pus through the retropharyngeal space; drainage was supplemented by the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and nasal feeding.

Maxillary sinus cyst containing a bone chip

March 2, 2015     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD

If bone fragments in the sinus can be removed, the patient's prognosis is usually excellent.

Bronchoscopic extraction of a chicken bone 5 years after aspiration

January 19, 2015     Parth Shah, MD; Angela Han, BA; Rishin Patel, MD; Paul Howlett, MD; Scott Akers, MD; Mitchell Margolis, MD; Sunil Singhal, MD


A 58-year-old man with a remote history of choking on a chicken bone 5 years earlier presented with chronic cough but had no remarkable clinical examination findings. He was being followed for recurrent pneumonias complicated by a resistant empyema, for which he had undergone thoracotomy and decortication. Imaging studies initially missed a foreign body (the chicken bone), which was found on follow-up studies and was removed with a flexible bronchoscope despite the fact that 5 years had passed since the aspiration.

Fish bone impaction in the supraglottis

October 17, 2014     Willis S.S. Tsang, FRCSEd(ORL); John K.S. Woo, FRCS(ORL); C. Andrew van Hasselt, M Med (Otol)

The most common sites of fish bone impaction are the tonsils, tonsillar pillars, tongue base, valleculae, and piriform fossa. Impaction in the supraglottic area is extremely uncommon.

Ear mold impression material as an aural foreign body

September 17, 2014     Yu-Hsuan Lin, MD; Ming-Yee Lin, MD, PhD

Physicians should not rush indiscriminately into action without a careful otoscopic examination and a detailed history, to discern whether a patient has abnormal anatomy and is at risk for complications.

An unusual presentation of anterior subglottic stenosis

June 8, 2014     Harry V. Wright, MD; Kenneth C. Fletcher, MD

Acquired subglottic stenosis should be suspected in any patient with unexplained dyspnea weeks to months following decannulation.

A "nail-biting" case of an airway foreign body

May 7, 2014     Parker A. Velargo, MD; Jennifer D. McLevy, MD

While cases of large, completely obstructing foreign bodies in the subglottis would lead to sudden respiratory distress, the initial presentation of smaller foreign bodies in the subglottis can be quite similar to croup, presenting with biphasic stridor, cough, and/or the steeple sign.

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