Dysphonia

Rosai-Dorfman disease with isolated laryngeal involvement

October 4, 2012     Elisa A. Illing, MD; Stacey L. Halum, MD
article

Abstract

Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare histiocyte disorder that is typically characterized by massive cervical lymphadenopathy. Isolated extranodal involvement is uncommon, and isolated laryngeal involvement is extremely rare. We report an unusual case of Rosai-Dorfman disease with isolated laryngeal involvement that led to recurrent dysphonia and airway obstruction. We discuss the challenges we faced in reaching a correct pathologic diagnosis and in deciding on an appropriate treatment regimen. Based on our experience, we believe that Rosai-Dorfman disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients who present with a recurrent inflammatory (histiocytic) mass lesion of the larynx.

Laryngeal papilloma

April 30, 2012     Rima A. DeFatta, MD; Johnathan B. Sataloff; Grace E. Klaris; Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
article

Anterior and posterior glottic webs

July 13, 2011     Jennifer M. Cannady, MA CCC-SLP and Lee A. Reussner, MD
article

Reinke edema: Signs, symptoms, and findings on strobovideolaryngoscopy

March 31, 2011     Danielle Gainor, MD, Farhad R. Chowdhury, DO, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
article

Laryngeal paraganglioma

September 30, 2010     Yoav Hahn, MD, Richard Isaacs, MD, and Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
article

Acute dysphonia secondary to vocal fold hemorrhage after vardenafil use

May 31, 2010     Vikas Singh, MD, Seth M. Cohen, MD, MPH, Bernard Rousseau, PhD, J. Pieter Noordzij, MD, C. Gaelyn Garrett, MD, and Robert H. Ossoff, DMD, MD
article

Abstract

Owing to their vasodilatory effects, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have become widely used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Among the reported adverse events of these agents are epistaxis, variceal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and hemorrhoidal bleeding. We report a case of vocal fold hemorrhage that occurred after vardenafil use in a 31-year-old man who was a professional singer.

Type 2 sulcus vocalis: Sulcus vergeture

January 1, 2010     Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS
article

Jugular fossa meningioma: Presentation and treatment options

September 30, 2009     Amy L. Rutt, DO, Xiaoli Chen, MD, and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
article

Abstract

Primary jugular fossa meningiomas are among the rarest subtypes of meningioma. They are intimately related to the lower cranial nerves, the jugular bulb and vein, and the temporal bone, and they have a tendency to extend both intra- and extracranially. The most common morbidity associated with jugular fossa lesions is lower cranial nerve deficits. In these cases, the differential diagnosis and preoperative radiographic diagnosis are very important because preoperative management and operative planning for the jugular fossa subtype differ considerably from those of other types of meningioma. Because of the rarity of this condition, our understanding of its treatment, long-term follow-up, and recurrence is limited. As experience with radiosurgical treatment of all meningiomas is accumulating, we may find that radiosurgery of jugular fossa meningiomas is appropriate. In the meantime, cure is still possible with complete surgical resection, and surgical morbidity can be minimized through meticulous planning and surgical technique. We describe a case of primary jugular fossa meningioma in a 45-year-old man who presented with complaints of chronic left aural fullness, hearing loss, and difficulty understanding voices. Imaging revealed the presence of a destructive jugular fossa mass. The patient underwent surgical resection without complication, and he was free of recurrence at 1 year of follow-up.

Tracheal amyloidosis-an unusual cause of stridor

April 30, 2009     Emer E. Lang, FRCS(ORL), Eimear Phelan, AFRCSI, and Helena Rowley, FRCS(ORL)
article

Abstract

Amyloidosis confined to the trachea is an exceedingly rare entity. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a history of dysphonia and stridor. Rigid bronchoscopy revealed a segment of abnormal tissue at the midtracheal level, resembling granulation tissue. A stent was placed in an attempt to secure the patient's airway, which was >50% narrowed. Although the patient's stridor disappeared completely, 5 days postoperatively it recurred, worsening within hours. Emergency bronchoscopy revealed that the tracheal stent was almost completely obstructed with amyloid and granulation tissue, despite high-dose steroid therapy, and had to be removed. Tracheostomy was performed to bypass the diseased trachea. We also highlight some of the problems encountered with tracheal stenting in benign tracheal disease.

A survey of current practices of physicians who treat adductor spasmodic dysphonia in the U.S.

April 30, 2009     Christopher Y. Chang, MD, Peter Chabot, PhD, and Christopher M. Walz, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a survey to determine the current practices of a subset of physicians in the United States who treat patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Surveys were sent to 169 physicians listed in the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association database, and responses were returned by 43 (25.4%). Almost all respondents (95.4%) indicated that they use botulinum toxin type A injections, either alone or in combination with other treatments, to treat adductor spasmodic dysphonia, and most (69.8%) inject the toxin under electromyographic guidance. However, there were wide variations in the amount of sterile saline used to reconstitute the toxin, the size of the initial dose, and the use of other treatment strategies.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome presenting as dysphonia and manifesting as tongue hypermobility: Report of 2 cases

February 1, 2009     Jeremy D. Richmon, MD, Jessica Wang-Rodriguez, MD, and Apurva A. Thekdi, MD
article

Abstract

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of related hereditary connective tissue diseases. EDS manifests as joint hypermobility, tissue elasticity, and easy bruising. Although affected patients typically present to primary care physicians, orthopedists, and rheumatologists, some head and neck symptoms (e.g., dysphonia, dysphagia, and/or temporomandibular joint complaints) may direct some to an otolaryngologist. We describe the cases of 2 patients who presented to our otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of dysphonia. On physical examination, both exhibited tongue hypermobility, and both were subsequently diagnosed with EDS. We also review the results of our comprehensive literature search, in which we found only 3 articles that specifically described tongue hypermobility; in each case, the hypermobility was related to EDS. Finally, we discuss presentations of EDS that otolaryngologists might encounter.

A rare cause of dysphonia

July 31, 2008     Iman Naseri, MD, Sarah K. Wise, MD, and Adam M. Klein, MD
article

Abstract

Although dysphonia is a common complaint among patients seen in an otolaryngology clinic, an autoimmune cause of the problem is less common. Autoimmune disease can be the source of various laryngologic manifestations, but diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion, careful patient evaluation and testing, and videolaryngoscopy (videostroboscopy if available) to uncover specific identifying findings. This report describes a patient presenting with upper-range vocal difficulties who was found to have early systemic lupus erythematosus.

PreviousPage
of 3Next