Dysphagia

Acquired vascular compression of the esophagus

December 1, 2008     Adriana Hachiya, MD, Neil N. Chheda, MD, and Gregory N. Postma, MD

Giant esophageal lymphangioma

August 31, 2008     Melanie W. Seybt, MD and Gregory N. Postma, MD

“Gastric pull-up” and dysphagia

May 31, 2008     Adriana Hachiya, MD, Neil N. Chheda, MD, and Gregory N. Postma, MD

Unilateral tonsillar lymphoepithelioma with ipsilateral parapharyngeal space involvement: A case report

December 1, 2007     Scott L. Lee, MD, Ching Y. Lee, MD, PhD, Rami K. Batniji, MD, and Steven Silver, MD
article

Abstract

We report a case of unilateral tonsillar lymphoepithelioma with extension into the ipsilateral parapharyngeal space, and we review the clinical, histologic, and radiographic findings of the case. The patient presented with a tonsillar mass that was confirmed on biopsy to be lymphoepithelioma. Computed tomography demonstrated ipsilateral parapharyngeal space involvement. Association with Epstein-Barr virus was not assessed since it does not affect the treatment modality. We also review the literature and discuss the diagnosis and current treatment options.

Upper esophageal web

December 1, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD and Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD

Giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus

September 30, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD; Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
article

A 56-year-old man was referred to the Center for Voice and Swallowing for management of a large upper esophageal mass. He complained of intermittent regurgitation of the mass and associated dyspnea.

Patulous lower esophageal sphincter

July 31, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD; Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
article

A 46-year-old man presented to the Center for Voice and Swallowing with symptoms of globus, pyrosis, and solid-food dysphagia. Findings on transnasal esophagoscopy were normal except for the presence of a widely patulous lower esophageal sphincter (LES) .

Isolated uvulitis

July 31, 2007     Marc Cohen, MD; Dinesh K. Chhetri, MD; Christian Head, MD
article

A 46-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with an 8-hour history of progressive throat pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia. Of note, she had begun her day by taking a magnesium oxide supplement for the first time. She reported no fever, chills, shortness of breath, trauma, or recent upper respiratory tract infection. Her medical history was significant for asthma, hypertension, and mitral valve prolapse. She also recalled an episode of acute tongue swelling during childhood.

Distal esophageal spasm

May 31, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD; Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD

Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

April 30, 2007     Troy Hutchins, MD; Paul Friedlander, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR

Gastric carcinoma

March 31, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD; Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD

Chronic esophageal stricture with Barrett's esophagus

February 1, 2007     Catherine J. Rees, MD; Peter C. Belafsky, MD, PhD
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