Cyst

Cystic chondromalacia of the auricle treated with dual-plane excision with intracartilaginous dissection

September 17, 2014     Giovanni Zoccali, MD; Reza Pajand, MD; Nikolaos Vrentzos, MD; Maurizio Giuliani, MD
article

Abstract

Cystic chondromalacia of the auricle is an uncommon condition in which a degenerative process occurs within the cartilage. The disorder affects young and middle-aged people. Clinically, it manifests as a painless, fluctuant swelling that frequently relapses despite various therapeutic approaches. In this article we report a typical case of cystic chondromalacia of the auricle that was successfully treated by surgery-specifically, dual-plane dissection-and we briefly review the literature.

Keratocystic odontogenic tumor

September 17, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Bite-wing or orthopantomograph images reveal a well-defined, unilocular radiolucency with a smooth border, showing minimal bone expansion and even cortication.

Saccular cyst as a complication of medialization laryngoplasty: A case report

August 27, 2014     Brent J. Benscoter, MD; Lee M. Akst, MD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of deterioration in her voice and swallowing function, which had begun after she had undergone a medialization laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Findings on examination and imaging revealed that a mass had developed adjacent to the Silastic implant that had been placed during the laryngoplasty. The superior extent of the implant reached above the laryngeal ventricle. Endolaryngeal surgical resection of the mass was accomplished without the need to remove the implant. Pathologic analysis identified the mass as a laryngeal saccular cyst. Although laryngeal saccular cysts are uncommon, medialization laryngoplasties are not. This case represents a rare complication of medialization laryngoplasty in which an implant compressed the laryngeal saccule and led to formation of the cyst.

Transnasal endoscopic resection of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

August 27, 2014     Daniel Schuster, MD; Joel Cure, MD; Bradford A. Woodworth, MD
article

Abstract

Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare histologic subtype of odontogenic tumor. Treatment requires complete enucleation. We report what we believe is the first case of CCOT to be removed via a transnasal endoscopic approach. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our department by his dentist for evaluation of an expansile mass of the left maxillary sinus. The dentist had noted an area of hyperlucency of the left palate during a routine examination. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a large tumor. Complete resection of the tumor was achieved via a transnasal endoscopic surgical approach. Resection of odontogenic tumors is necessary because of their tendency to expand and produce a mass effect on surrounding structures. We believe resection via an entirely transnasal endoscopic approach is a valuable and important technique in the treatment of odontogenic tumors that leaves the patient with a more cosmetically acceptable postoperative appearance.

Primary cervical thoracic duct cyst: A case report and review of the literature

July 13, 2014     Ameet Kumar, MS; T.S. Ramakrishnan, MS; Samaresh Sahu, MD, DNB
article

Abstract

Thoracic duct cysts are uncommon entities that are usually found in the thoracic segments of the thoracic duct. The presence of a thoracic duct cyst in the cervical area has been rarely reported. Etiologically, these cysts can arise either as a primary growth or secondary to trauma, obstruction, or inflammation. This entity was first described in 1964, and only 33 cases have been previously reported in literature. Of these, 16 cases involved a primary cyst. We report a new case of a primary thoracic duct cyst, and we discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and management, with an emphasis on meticulous surgical technique. We also review the relevant literature.

Endoscopic view of a middle meatal cyst

July 13, 2014     Dewey A. Christmas, MD; Joseph P. Mirante, MD, FACS; Eiji Yanagisawa, MD, FACS
article

Obstruction of the middle meatus and ethmoid infundibulum can occur as a result of swelling of the mucosal surfaces of the soft tissues, although most such obstructions are caused by polyps. Obstruction from a cystic mass is less common.

Facial nerve palsy associated with a cystic lesion of the temporal bone

March 18, 2014     Na Hyun Kim, MD; Seung-Ho Shin, MD
article

Abstract

Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign, self-limiting inflammatory condition known as Bell palsy. However, there are other conditions that may cause facial paralysis, such as neoplastic conditions of the facial nerve, traumatic nerve injury, and temporal bone leions. We present a case of facial nerve palsy concurrent with a benign cystic lesion of the temporal bone, adjacent to the tympanic segment of the facial nerve. The patient's symptoms subsided after facial nerve decompression via a transmastoid approach.

Case report: Dermal inclusion cyst of the external auditory canal

December 20, 2013     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Jonathan S. Kulbersh, MD; Paul R. Lambert, MD
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Abstract

Dermal inclusion cysts are benign masses that arise as the result of the entrapment of ectodermal components during embryogenesis. Their presenting symptoms are a direct result of the mass effect of the growing cyst. We describe the case of a 23-month-old girl who presented with a single, large dermal inclusion cyst in the external auditory canal. Our review of the literature revealed that only 2 other cases of a dermal inclusion cyst in this location have been previously reported.

Extensive dentigerous cyst associated with a mesiodens: CT findings

August 21, 2013     Kyung Soo Kim, MD, PhD and Seog-Kyun Mun, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

The most common of the supernumerary teeth in humans are mesiodentes, which arise in the midline of the maxilla between the central incisors. The most common pathologic findings associated with a mesiodens are retention of the adjacent incisors, malposition, and diastema. The development of a dentigerous cyst in association with an impacted mesiodens is relatively uncommon. We report the case of a 35-year-old man with an extensive dentigerous cyst associated with a mesiodens who presented with a painful swelling in the left nasolabial area. We discuss the imaging findings in this case, particularly the contribution of computed tomography, and we review the literature on this interesting condition.

Ganglion cyst in the external auditory canal

August 21, 2013     Chi-Kyou Lee, MD; Mee-Hye Oh, MD; and Kye Hoon Park, MD
article

In rare instances, ganglion cysts of the TMJ can pre-sent as a mass of the EAC, sometimes without obvious communication with the glenoid fossa.

Wrong egg in the usual nest: Thyroid papillary carcinoma within a branchial cleft cyst

July 21, 2013     Mustafa Sagit, MD; Ayhan Gokler, MD; Istemihan Akin, MD; Unsal Han, MD
article

Abstract

Branchial cleft cysts are the most common lesions to arise laterally in the neck. Ectopic thyroid tissue within a branchial cleft cyst is rare, and a papillary carcinoma arising from this tissue is extremely rare. We present a case of a lateral neck cyst representing a primary papillary carcinoma that arose in ectopic thyroid tissue within a branchial cleft cyst in a 41-year-old woman. After the mass was surgically excised, thyroid ultrasonography, thyroid scintigraphy, and whole-body F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected no abnormality. The negative findings notwithstanding, surgery on the thyroid gland was planned, but the patient refused it. Therefore, she was followed up with ultrasonography and scintigraphy for 5 years, during which time she exhibited no evidence of recurrence. Total thyroidectomy is still the primary option in such cases, but when it cannot be performed for any reason, vigilant follow-up is essential.

Aneurysmal bone cyst in the middle turbinate: A case report

June 11, 2013     Gokce Simsek, MD; Cem Saka, MD; Didem N. Sonbay, MD; Istemihan Akin, MD; and Fulya Koybasioglu, MD
article

Abstract

Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign and locally destructive bone lesion usually seen in the younger population. Its etiology is unknown. Its yearly incidence rate has been reported to be 0.14/100,000, comprising 1% of all bone tumors. It may develop primarily or arise from primary bone tumors. Hemorrhagic fluid content with a septated appearance is the characteristic feature of aneurysmal bone cyst. It is most commonly seen in the metaphysis of the long bones. In rare cases, the cyst is located in the skull. Primary treatment is surgical excision, and the recurrence rate after treatment is 10 to 30%. Based on a review of the current literature, there have been no previous reports of aneurysmal bone cyst located in the middle turbinate. We report a case of aneurysmal bone cyst with an atypical location and discuss the treatment of the patient with endoscopic surgery in light of relevant literature.

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