Cholesteatoma

Bilateral external auditory canal cholesteatomas

March 18, 2014     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Alejandro Vazquez, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
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External auditory canal cholesteatomas may be classified as idiopathic or secondarily acquired, most commonly occurring in postoperative or post-traumatic settings.

Acquired cholesteatoma presenting as a pars squamosa temporal bone mass

February 12, 2014     Christopher Vanison, MD; Eric M. Jaryszak, MD, PhD; Amanda L. Yaun, MD; and Diego A. Preciado, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Acquired cholesteatomas typically arise in the middle ear and mastoid cavities; they rarely present elsewhere. We describe a case of acquired cholesteatoma that presented as a large mass of the pars squamosa of the temporal bone in a 16-year-old girl. The mass was surgically removed without complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of an acquired cholesteatoma in the lateral temporal bone.

Congenital cholesteatoma in a 3-year-old

April 17, 2013     Danielle M. Blake, BA; Senja Tomovic, MD; Robert W. Jyung, MD
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 When a congenital cholesteatoma is diagnosed early as a localized circumscribed mass, it can be resected with a very low risk of recurrence.

External auditory canal cholesteatoma

July 5, 2012     Joseph A. Ursick, MD; Derald E. Brackmann, MD
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External auditory canal cholesteatomas, which result from the deposition of squamous epithelium deep to the skin of the external canal, can be caused by postsurgical implantation, radiation, or trauma.

Cholesteatoma of the nose and maxillary and ethmoid sinuses: A rare complication of palatal surgery

September 20, 2011     Borlingegowda Viswanatha, MS, DLO
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Abstract

A 10-year-old boy presented with a complaint of a left-sided nasal obstruction with an associated foul-smelling discharge. Physical examination and anterior rhinoscopy revealed that a whitish, friable mass had completely filled the left nasal cavity. On computed tomography, a soft-tissue mass was seen filling the cavity and extending to the paranasal sinuses with bone erosion. A biopsy of the mass suggested that it represented a cholesteatoma. The lesion was removed via nasal endoscopy, and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a cholesteatoma. No recurrence was noted during 6 months of follow-up. Cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare entity, as only a few dozen cases have been reported in the literature.

Spontaneous posterior wall external canal cholesteatoma

July 13, 2011     Luca Oscar Redaelli de Zinis, MD
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Congenital middle ear cholesteatoma

October 31, 2010     Min-Tsan Shu, MD, Hung-Ching Lin, MD, Cheng-Chien Yang, MD, and Yu-Chun Chen, MD
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External ear canal cholesteatoma

August 31, 2010     Murat Topdag, MD and Efser Can, MD
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Extensive external auditory canal cholesteatoma in the infratemporal area without mastoid involvement: Use of a new surgical technique

August 31, 2010     Jun Ho Lee, MD, Sang Ho Jung, MD, Chan Hum Park, MD, and Seok Min Hong, MD
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Abstract

The external auditory canal (EAC) is an unusual location for a cholesteatoma. We present the cases of 2 patients with EAC cholesteatoma who experienced extensive damage that extended from the inferior EAC wall to the infratemporal area; there was no mastoid involvement. In both cases, the cholesteatomas were removed under local anesthesia and the inferior canal wall was reconstructed with a technique that involved the placement of a pedicled musculoperiosteal flap, a cartilage graft, and a full-thickness skin graft. This simple procedure preserves a normal EAC contour, middle ear space, and mastoid cavity.

Congenital cholesteatoma in the tympanic membrane

July 31, 2010     Min-Tsan Shu, MD, Hung-Ching Lin, MD, Cheng-Chien Yang, MD, and Yu-Chun Chen, MD
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Therapeutic approaches to complicated cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal: A case of associated facial paresis

July 31, 2010     Malek Belcadhi, MD, Houda Chahed, PhD, Radhouane Mani, MD, and Kamel Bouzouita, MD
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Abstract

Spontaneous cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal (EAC) is an uncommon condition that is difficult to diagnose. In a patient with such a possibility, serious clinical investigation along with radiologic and histologic exploration should be performed early on because a delay in treatment can lead to severe complications. Given the rarity of EAC cholesteatoma, no therapeutic consensus has emerged. The type of management depends on the extensiveness of invasion and bone erosion and the status of the neighboring structures. The primary therapeutic objectives are to eradicate the cholesteatoma and then to fill in the residual cavity, which in our opinion can be best accomplished with a muscle flap and EAC reconstruction. Postoperative follow-up should be carried out to look for infections, stenosis, and recurrence. We report a new case of spontaneous EAC cholesteatoma, and we review its diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

Cholesterol granuloma and recurrent cholesteatoma after canal-wall-down mastoidectomy

June 30, 2010     S. Todd Hamilton, MD, Swarupa A. Gadre, MD, and Arun K. Gadre, MD, FACS
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