Carcinoma

Disfiguring basal cell carcinoma of the nose (“clown nose”)

January 25, 2012     Jose Aneiros-Fernandez, MD, Salvador Arias-Santiago, MD, Cesar Garcia-Lopez, MD, and Francisco O'Valle, MD, PhD
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Unusual parapharyngeal acinic cell carcinoma

January 25, 2012     Jeremy Nguyen, MD, Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR, Elorice Horam, MD, and Harold Neitzschman, MD, FACR
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Squamous cell carcinoma of the middle ear

January 25, 2012     Min-Tsan Shu, MD, Jehn-Chuan Lee, MD, Cheng-Chien Yang, MD, and Kang-Chao Wu, MD
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Thyroid carcinoma with intravascular metastasis to the internal jugular vein

December 15, 2011     Ryan F. Osborne, MD, Hootan Zandifar, MD, and Reena Gupta, MD
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Papillary thyroid carcinoma with nodular fasciitis-like stroma: A case report

October 26, 2011     Bevinahalli N. Nandeesh, MD, DNB, Anuradha Ananthamurthy, MD, Yeliur K. Inchara, MD, DNB, Marjorie M.A. Correa, MD, and Isha Garg, MD
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Abstract

Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most frequently occurring malignant neoplasm of the thyroid gland and is known to have several morphologic variants. PTC with nodular fasciitis-like stroma (PTC-NFS) is one of the unusual variants of PTC, with only a few cases being reported in the literature. This neoplasm is characterized by extensive reactive stromal proliferation, which may occupy 60 to 80% of the tumor along with areas of a typical papillary carcinoma. We report a case of PTC-NFS and address the diagnostic difficulties posed by the condition's extensive reactive stromal proliferation. We also emphasize that when one encounters a fibroproliferative lesion of the thyroid, a diligent search should also be made for PTC to avoid diagnostic errors.

Primary frontal sinus carcinoma with extradural anterior cranial fossa involvement

October 26, 2011     J. Madana, MS, DNB, Deeke Yolmo, MS, S. Gopalakrishnan, MS, and Sunil Kumar Saxena, MS
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Abstract

Paranasal sinus carcinoma is rare, with an estimated annual incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 population. Primary frontal sinus involvement is extremely rare, accounting for only 0.3% of all paranasal sinus malignancies. A frontal sinus cancer may be mistaken for a mucocele, pyocele, or osteomyelitis. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a carcinoma that originated in the frontal sinus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bony destruction with intracranial extension but no involvement of the bulbus. The patient underwent a frontal craniotomy, tumor excision, and postoperative radiotherapy. One year later, she remained symptom-free.

Cervical thymic cyst presenting as a possible cystic nodal metastasis of papillary carcinoma in a 53-year-old man

September 20, 2011     Woong Na, MD, Si-Hyong Jang, MD, Kyueng-Whan Min, MD, Seok Hyun Cho, MD, PhD, and Seung Sam Paik, MD, PhD
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Abstract

Cervical thymic cysts are rare embryonic remnants that develop along the course of thymic migration in the neck. They usually occur during infancy and childhood, and they are extremely rare in adults. We report a case of cervical thymic cyst in a 53-year-old man. The patient presented with a small mass of the thyroid gland and a cystic mass at the left level II area of the neck. On histopathology, the thyroid mass was identified as a papillary carcinoma and the left-sided neck mass was diagnosed as a cervical thymic cyst lined with nonkeratinizing, flattened squamous epithelium. The cyst wall contained atrophic thymic tissue composed of lymphoid cells, epithelial cords, and Hassall corpuscles. Although it is rare, cervical thymic cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a lateral cystic neck mass in an adult.

Eccrine porocarcinoma of the external ear

August 15, 2011     Bruce Watkins, MD, Andrew C. Urquhart, MD, and James J. Holt, MD
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Abstract

Eccrine porocarcinoma (EP) is believed to arise from the intraepithelial portion of the eccrine sweat glands. The incidence rate of EP is reported to be 18 per 450,000 biopsies. Most of the diagnosed cases involve the lower extremities; a case of EP involving the ear is rare. We describe the clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features of EP in an 11-year-old boy.

Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

August 15, 2011     Candice Colby, MD and Adam M. Klein, MD
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Abstract

Papillary squamous cell carcinoma is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma of the aerodigestive tract that has been correlated with a more favorable prognosis than conventional squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In this report, the authors present a case of papillary squamous cell carcinoma and a review of the literature on this topic.

Laryngeal spindle cell squamous cell carcinoma

April 30, 2011     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Pathologic evaluation of primary laryngeal anterior commissure carcinoma both in patients who have undergone open surgery as initial treatment and in those who have undergone salvage surgery after irradiation failure

April 30, 2011     Wael A. Ahmed, MD, MSc, Kenji Suzuki, MD, PhD, Yoshimune Horibe, MD, PhD, Ichiro Kato, MD, Toshiyuki Fujisawa, MD, and Yoichi Nishimura, MD
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Abstract

Laryngeal anterior commissure (AC) cancer has been the subject of much controversy. Our study was aimed at pathologically evaluating the tendency of AC cancer to invade the thyroid cartilage and analyzing the role of thyroid cartilage invasion by tumor cells at the AC as an anatomic cause for irradiation failure. Our study included 36 patients with glottic cancer involving AC. Patients with recurrent or persistent disease after radiotherapy underwent salvage surgery. Surgical specimens from 22 patients who had open surgery, either as primary or salvage surgery, were available for pathologic examination to identify the presence of cartilage invasion. We found microscopic invasion of the thyroid cartilage in 40.9% of the studied tumors. Only 21.4% of patients who had open salvage surgery showed evidence of cartilage invasion at the AC. We concluded that laryngeal AC cancers are more likely to invade the cartilage, and that anatomic risk factors are not the main cause of irradiation failure.

Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the anterior maxilla: An unusual case and review of the literature

April 30, 2011     Nadia Mohyuddin, MD and Mike Yao, MD
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Abstract

Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the head and neck is rare, and lesions isolated to the anterior maxilla are obviously even more rare. The diagnosis of intraosseous carcinoma can be difficult, and it must be based on strict criteria. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who was referred for definitive treatment of a cancerous lesion of the anterior maxilla. The patient's mass had initially been thought to be a benign odontogenic cyst. The patient was treated with surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation. We describe the clinical presentation, pertinent workup including imaging, and the treatment of this case, and we review the literature.

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