Carcinoma

Merkel cell carcinoma

March 18, 2014     Jeffrey D. Shiffer, MD; Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

The expected 5-year survival rate for patients with Merkel cell carcinoma is more than 80% if the tumor is less than 2 cm and has not metastasized. Once a tumor has metastasized regionally, the 5-year survival rate drops to about 50%.

Early detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 serology assay

March 18, 2014     Achmad C. Romdhoni, MD, PhD; Nurul Wiqoyah, MS; Widodo Ario Kentjono, MD, PhD
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Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common head and neck malignancy in Indonesia. Overall, it ranks fourth in males and sixth in females as the most prevalent type of cancer in that country. The data show that in the year 2011, NPC incidence was considered to be intermediate (6.2/100,000 population per year). Through histopathologic examination, about 70 to 80% of these cases were found to be type III according to the WHO classificaton. NPC carries an excellent prognosis if treated early, but most patients presented with stage III to IV disease, which negatively affected the cure rate and increased the mortality rate. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) IgA serology has been established as an effective marker for NPC. Therefore, biologic markers, DNA, and/or antibody-based diagnosis is needed to decrease NPC cases. A screening program needs to be developed that will identify people at high risk of NPC and those who are in the early stage of the disease. In this study, 20 samples were collected from posttherapy patients. An otolaryngologic examination, histopathology of nasopharyngeal tissue, and blood testing for serologic markers were performed. IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed positive impact as a tool for confirming the diagnosis of NPC, but it still has to be combined with other specific diagnostic tools for post-therapy monitoring and for determining prognosis.

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the pinna: Report of a rare case

January 21, 2014     Anil Jain, MS; Ashish Katarkar, MS; Pankaj Shah, MS; Jignasa Bhalodia, MD; Sanyogita Jain, MD; Sapna Katarkar, DA
article

Abstract

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is rare. We report a case of BSCC in a 60-year-old woman who presented with a bleeding vascular growth on the left pinna. To the best of our knowledge, no case of BSCC of the pinna has been previously reported in the literature. We present this case to alert physicians that this highly aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma can appear on the pinna and therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in this area.

Recurrence of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma manifesting as a cerebellopontine angle mass

December 20, 2013     Min Han Kong, MS; Jahendran Jeevanan, MS; Thanabalan Jegan, MS
article

Abstract

As many as 31% of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma present with intracranial extension. Despite this high percentage, extension to the cerebellopontine angle is rare. The mechanism of tumor spread to the cerebellopontine angle is not completely understood. The most likely mechanism is direct extension to the skull base with involvement of the petrous apex and further extension posteriorly via the medial tentorial edge. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who had been treated initially with chemoradiation and subsequently with stereotactic radiosurgery for residual tumor. One year later, she presented with an intracranial recurrence of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the cerebellopontine angle; the recurrence mimicked a benign tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor was ultimately diagnosed as an undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal origin. She was treated with palliative chemotherapy.

Case report: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil

October 23, 2013     Jeffrey R. Janus, MD; Sivakumar Chinnadurai, MD; Eric J. Moore, MD
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Abstract

Paraneoplastic syndromes include a variety of disorders that affect the neurologic, endocrine, mucocutaneous, hematologic, and other systems as a result of neoplastic disease. Although their presentations vary, syndromes occur when tumor antigens exhibit cross-reactivity to similar antigens expressed by these systems. The antigens in the nervous system are called “onconeural” antigens. Although many disorders are associated with a comparatively high incidence of paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes, only a few cases have been associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who initially presented with weakness and spastic gait. He was subsequently found to have a characteristic paraneoplastic tractopathy on thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. The subsequent workup and operative intervention identified a T2N0M0 SCC of the tonsil. Following resection, the patient's overall symptoms were significantly alleviated, and his gait improved. A thorough literature search yielded no other report of a tonsillar SCC with associated paraneoplastic thoracic spine tractopathy.

Synchronous verrucous carcinoma and inverted papilloma of the lacrimal sac: Case report and clinical update

October 23, 2013     Cheryl Gustafson, MD; Eugene Einhorn, MD; Mary H. Scanlon, MD; Kenneth E. Morgenstern, MD; Paul J. Howlett, MD; Noam A. Cohen, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

Inverted papilloma is a benign epithelial tumor of the nasal cavity. It is known to coexist with malignancy in 5 to 13% of cases, with squamous cell carcinoma being the most common malignancy. Another associated malignancy, one that is extremely rare, is verrucous carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, no case of verrucous carcinoma occurring alone or in association with another neoplasm has been described in the nasolacrimal system. We report a case of synchronous verrucous carcinoma and inverted papilloma of the lacrimal sac in a 47-year-old man. The patient presented with epiphora, nasal obstruction, swelling of the left medial canthus, and drainage of a foul-smelling fluid from the left nostril. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging detected the presence of a large mass occupying the left nasal cavity and sinuses with extension into the nasopharynx. In addition, bony invasion of the anteroinferomedial wall of the left orbit was noted with extension of the tumor into the orbit itself, which resulted in lateral displacement of the left medial rectus muscle. The patient underwent endoscopic debulking of the left sinonasal lesion. Of note, the surgery had to be completed in stages because of excessive blood loss. Histopathologic examination of the intranasal component of the tumor identified it as an inverted papilloma. One month after the intranasal resection, a left dacryocystectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed that an invasive verrucous squamous cell carcinoma had arisen within the inverted papilloma.

Undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma

October 23, 2013     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Histologically, undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas show a variety of patterns, from sheet-like, storiform, fascicular, angiomatoid, and meningothelial to solid, exhibiting extensive lymph-vascular invasion.

Endometrial carcinoma metastatic to the retromolar pad

September 18, 2013     Hisham Hatoum, DDS; Bruno C. Jham, DDS, MS, PhD; Karen Garber, DMD; Jaime S. Brahim, DDS, MS; Mark A. Scheper, DDS, PhD
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Abstract

Metastatic carcinoma from the female genitalia to the oral mucosa is exceptionally rare, with only 11 such cases having been previously reported in the English-language literature. We describe a new case in a 65-year-old woman with a history of endometrial carcinoma who presented with swelling of the retromolar pad. Radiographic examination showed slight opacities and irregular trabecular bone in the left posterior mandible. Following an incisional biopsy, histologic examination and immunohistochemical studies revealed glandular adenocarcinoma with positivity for progesterone receptor, estrogen receptor, and cytokeratin 7. The patient was referred to her primary care physician for comprehensive treatment. This case illustrates the value of considering cancer metastasis in the differential diagnosis of an oral swelling, particularly in a patient with a history of cancer.

Thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma: Case report and review of the literature

September 18, 2013     David W. Jang, MD; Andrew G. Sikora, MD, PhD; Anatoly Leytin, MD
article

Abstract

Well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma of a thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) is a rare entity, found in about 1% of all TGDCs. Diagnosis is usually made incidentally after a Sistrunk procedure. Options for further therapy include total thyroidectomy, T4 suppression therapy, and radioactive iodine ablation. In a patient with a normal-appearing thyroid gland and no evidence of metastatic disease, the treatment course is controversial. The recent literature emphasizes the identification of risk factors that may prompt the clinician to pursue more aggressive treatment. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who was found to have a 1-cm midline neck mass that showed atypical cells on fine-needle aspiration. Histologic analysis after a Sistrunk procedure revealed a small focus of papillary carcinoma within the TGDC. The patient subsequently underwent total thyroidectomy with no evidence of carcinoma on histologic examination.

Lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid gland, a very unusual tumor: Case report and review

September 18, 2013     Natarajan Anantharajan, MRCS, MCh; Nagamuttu Ravindranathan, FRCS, FDRCS; Pathmanathan Rajadurai, MBBS, FRCPA
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Abstract

Lymphoepithelial carcinoma (LEC) of the parotid gland is rare. When it does occur, it is usually seen in Asians and Greenland Eskimos. An association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been documented. We report a case of EBV-associated LEC of the parotid gland in a 30-year-old Chinese woman. The patient underwent a total parotidectomy with preservation of the facial nerve, followed by postoperative radiotherapy. She recovered well without complications or recurrence. We present this case in view of the rarity of LEC, which has prevented extensive study of its clinical course, optimal treatment options, and overall prognosis.

Practical applications of in-office fiberoptic transnasal esophagoscopy in the initial evaluation of patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

September 18, 2013     Robert W. Dolan, MD; Timothy D. Anderson, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a study to analyze the effectiveness of transnasal esophagoscopy (TNE) as an alternative to operative endoscopy (OE) for the evaluation of primary head and neck cancers and for the surveillance of synchronous esophageal cancers. Our study population was made up of 96 consecutively presenting patients-75 men and 21 women, aged 45 to 88 years (mean: 64)-who were treated at our institution for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Of this group, 42 patients had been evaluated with TNE and 54 with OE. More OEs were performed in patients with an unknown primary (26 vs. 3). Incidental findings on TNE included 3 cases of gastritis, 2 cases each of hiatal hernia and esophagitis, 1 case of Barrett esophagus, and 1 inlet patch. No incidental findings were reported during OE. Primary cancers were biopsied by TNE through a port on the endoscope in 4 patients; 2 of these cancers were in the tongue base, 1 in the hypopharynx, and 1 in the aryepiglottic fold. After the initial visit, patients in the TNE group waited significantly fewer days for their endoscopy than did those in the OE group (median: 6.5 vs. 16; p < 0.05). Conversely, patients in the OE group waited significantly fewer days for treatment following endoscopy (median: 12 vs. 20; p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the TNE patients and the OE patients in the total number of days comprising their entire course of management, from the initial visit to definite treatment (median: 27.5 and 33 days, respectively; p = 0.7). We conclude that TNE is a reasonable alternative to OE for the initial screening for synchronous esophageal cancers in patients with squamous cancers of the head and neck. OE is preferred for the initial workup of unknown primary cancers and for large tongue base cancers. The rate of detection of clinically relevant incidental findings is higher with TNE. Biopsy is possible during TNE for all subsites within the upper aerodigestive tract.

Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla: Unusual location and aggressive behavior of a rare histologic variant

September 18, 2013     Ozan Bagis Ozgursoy, MD; Ozden Tulunay, MD; Sami Engin Muz, MD; Gaffar Aslan, MD; Babur Kucuk, MD
article

Abstract

Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) of the mucosal membranes has been documented sporadically. The highly aggressive behavior of a mucosal ASCC arising in the oral cavity has been recently reported. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case of maxillary ASCC previously has been reported in the literature. We pre-sent what we believe is only the second case of maxillary ASCC. Our goal is to emphasize the aggressive behavior of this tumor in order to add weight to the argument that the prognosis is poor.

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