Carcinoma

Guidelines for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: A systematic assessment of quality

April 27, 2015     Yanming Jiang, MD; Xiao-Dong Zhu, PhD; Song Qu, PhD; Ling Li, MD; Zhirui Zhou, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a study to evaluate the quality of guidelines for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with the exception of nasopharyngeal cancer. Electronic searches were conducted of the U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse, the Canadian Medical Association Infobase, the Guidelines International Network, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, the China Biology Medicine disc, PubMed, and Embase. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligible guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. The degree of agreement among these sources was evaluated by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). A total of 514 articles were found to be clinical-guideline-related, and 49 guidelines were included in our analysis. Scores were assigned for each of the AGREE II domains: scope and purpose (mean: 71.63% ± 2.80; median: 75%; ICC: 0.76), stakeholder involvement (mean: 43.37% ± 2.96; median: 50%; ICC: 0.93), rigor of development (mean: 45.63% ± 3.84; median: 42%; ICC: 0.83), clarity of presentation (mean: 68.08% ± 2.53; median: 72%; ICC: 0.85), applicability (mean: 32.41% ± 3.03; median: 29%; ICC: 0.92), and editorial independence (mean: 42.55% ± 4.57; median: 42%; ICC: 0.95). We considered a domain score of greater than 60% to represent an acceptable level of quality. We conclude that, overall, the quality of SCCHN guidelines is moderate in relation to international averages. Greater efforts are needed to provide high-quality guidelines that serve as a useful and reliable tool for clinical decision making in this field.

Acinic cell carcinoma of the posterior wall of the pharynx

April 27, 2015     Gökhan Erpek, MD; Ceren Günel, MD; Ibrahim Meteoğlu, MD
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Abstract

Acinic cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 2 to 6% of all salivary gland tumors. It usually originates in the parotid gland; the minor salivary glands and the upper respiratory tract are involved only infrequently. We describe a case of acinic cell carcinoma of the posterior wall of the pharynx in a 21-year-old woman. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of this type of carcinoma at this location to be published in the literature. The mass was excised, and the patient was referred for postoperative radiation therapy to reduce the risk of local recurrence, but she did not keep her appointment and was lost to follow-up.

Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma as a third primary neoplasm: A case report and review of the literature

April 27, 2015     John J. Chi, MD; Michael D. Feldman, MD; James N. Palmer, MD
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Abstract

A 71-year-old man with a history of a pituitary prolactinoma and metastatic pancreatic carcinoma presented with epistaxis, visual changes, bilateral ophthalmoplegia, involuntary closure of the left eye, and ptosis of the right eye. The patient was found to have a soft-tissue mass in the posterior nasal cavity with extension through the floor of the sella turcica, the sphenoid sinuses, cavernous sinuses, and suprasellar region. The patient was subsequently taken to the operating room. Intraoperative frozen section of the sinonasal mass demonstrated carcinoma. The final pathology of the mass revealed sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma (SNUC)-the patient's second skull base lesion and third primary neoplasm. SNUC is a rare neoplasm of the sinonasal cavities that rapidly progresses from symptom onset to mortality in the presence of aggressive multidimensional therapies. Given its poor prognosis and possibly devastating treatments, an open discussion of treatment options between physicians and the patient is of the utmost importance. Although SNUC is rare, it is important that practicing otolaryngologists, neurosurgeons, and skull base surgeons be familiar with this disease process-especially when caring for patients with a history of a benign skull base neoplasm and concern for possible recurrence, as was the case in this report.

Chronic discharging ear and multiple cranial nerve pareses: A sinister liaison

April 27, 2015     Mainak Dutta, MS; Dipankar Mukherjee, MS; Subrata Mukhopadhyay, MS
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SCC of the temporal bone might well represent the extreme of the “inflammation-metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma” sequence, with chronic otitis media representing the inflammation.

Thyroid gland follicular carcinoma

March 2, 2015     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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The recommended treatment is lobectomy or total thyroidectomy, with or without radioablation. The choice depends on the size and stage of the tumor, extent of lymphovascular invasion, and patient's age.

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the sinonasal tract with metastasis to the liver: A case report and literature review

February 2, 2015     Boon Ping Toe, FRCR(Lond); Norlisah Ramli, FRCR(Lond); Sze Yin Lam, MRad(Mal); Kum Thong Wong, FRCPath(Lond); Narayanan Prepageran, FRCS(Edin)
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Abstract

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is a rare subtype of squamous cell carcinoma. To date, only 95 cases of sinonasal BSCC have been reported in the English-language literature, and they account for 5% of all cases of head and neck BSCC. We describe what we believe is only the second reported case of a sinonasal tract BSCC that metastasized to the liver. The patient was a 36-year-old woman who presented with right-sided nasal obstruction and a foul-smelling discharge. Clinical examination and imaging identified a large lobulated enhancing mass in the right nasal cavity. Following excision of the mass, the patient was scheduled for radiotherapy. However, before it could be administered, follow-up imaging detected a metastasis to the liver and lung, and the patient was switched to chemotherapy. Initially, she responded well clinically, but at 5 months postoperatively, a follow-up CT showed an increasing metastatic presence in the liver and bone. The patient died of her disease 1 year after surgery.

Mixed verrucous and squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

February 2, 2015     Giuseppe V. Staltari, BS; John W. Ingle, MD; Clark A. Rosen, MD
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The lesion was removed en bloc, including the involved thyroarytenoid muscle.

Metastatic breast carcinoma presenting as unilateral pulsatile tinnitus: A case report

February 2, 2015     Andrew Moore, MRCS, DOHNS; Max Cunnane, BMBS, BMedSci; Jason C. Fleming, MRCS, DOHNS, MEd
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Abstract

Pulsatile tinnitus is a rare symptom, yet it may herald life-threatening pathology in the absence of other symptoms or signs. Pulsatile tinnitus tends to imply a vascular cause, but metastatic disease also can present in this way. Clinicians should therefore adopt a specific diagnostic algorithm for pulsatile tinnitus and always consider the possibility of metastatic disease. A history of malignant disease and new cranial nerve palsies should raise clinical suspicion for skull base metastases. We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with unilateral subjective pulsatile tinnitus and a middle ear mass visible on otoscopy. Her background included the diagnosis of idiopathic unilateral vagal and hypoglossal nerve palsies 4 years previously, with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repeat MRI and computed tomography imaging were consistent with metastatic breast carcinoma. This case raises important questions about imaging protocols and the role of serial scanning in patients at high risk of metastatic disease.

Palliative endoscopic surgery for sinonasal metastases: A case report and literature review

February 2, 2015     Jason M. Roberts, MD; Christopher Brook, MD; Steven Parnes, MD
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Abstract

Cancer metastatic to the paranasal sinuses often presents with ophthalmologic and facial deformities, as well as sinonasal complaints. These diminutive tumors are difficult to effectively treat, often leading to poor quality of life. Although breast cancer is a common cancer affecting more than 150,000 women each year,1 rarely is metastatic breast cancer found within the sinuses. We report our palliative treatment approach and outcomes of a 40-year-old patient with breast cancer metastatic to the paranasal sinuses. While providing a better understanding of this tumor's metastasis through a review of the literature, our report describes the role of palliative surgery for metastases to the paranasal sinuses.

The efficacy of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis

February 2, 2015     Eric W. Cerrati, MD; Shaun A. Nguyen, MD, MA, CPI; Joshua D. Farrar, MD; Eric J. Lentsch, MD
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Abstract

We performed an extensive review of the literature to compare the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to surgical resection, the current standard of care, in the treatment of adults with early-stage (T1-2N0M0) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Since patients who receive PDT are chosen with a high degree of selectivity, particular care was taken when extracting data for comparison. For outcomes measures, PDT was assessed in terms of a complete response to therapy, and surgery was evaluated in terms of locoregional control. Recurrences were also analyzed. We found 24 studies-12 for each treatment-to compare for this meta-analysis. In comparing a complete response to PDT and locoregional control with surgery, we found no statistically significant difference (mean difference [MD]: 1.166; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.479 to 2.839). With respect to recurrences, again no statistically significant difference was observed (MD: 0.552; 95% CI: 0.206 to 1.477). We conclude that PDT is as effective as primary surgical resection for the treatment of early-stage SCC of the oral cavity and that it is a valid function-preserving approach to treatment.

Primary calcitonin-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx

January 19, 2015     Arsheed H. Hakeem, MBBS, MS; Sultan Pradhan, MS, FRCS; Sanica Bhele, MD; Jagadish Tubachi, MS
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The most troubling differential diagnosis for calcitonin-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the larynx is medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, as these two tumors can be morphologically indistinguishable.

Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil presenting as otorrhea: A case report

January 19, 2015     Eelam Adil, MD; Dhave Setabutr, MD; Soha N. Ghossaini, MD; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
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Abstract

We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a history of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil who presented with right subacute otalgia and otorrhea. Dedicated computed tomography of the temporal bones showed opacification within the mastoid process with destruction of bony mastoid septations consistent with coalescent mastoiditis. Preoperative imaging showed no destruction or expansion of the bony eustachian tube that would indicate that a direct spread had occurred. An urgent cortical mastoidectomy was performed. Intraoperatively, a friable white mass surrounded with purulence and granulation tissue was biopsied and returned as SCC. The discrete metastasis was removed without complication. Postoperatively, the patient was prescribed palliative chemotherapy. This case shows that a metastatic SCC can be masked by an overlying mastoiditis, and thus it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with a history of oropharyngeal cancer.

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