Carcinoma

Report of a rare case of carcinoma arising in a branchial cyst

September 17, 2014     Natarajan Anantharajan, MBBS, MS, MRCS; Nagamuttu Ravindranathan, BDS, MBBS, FRCS(Edin)
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Abstract

Primary branchiogenic carcinoma is a rare condition. In fact, most of the cases that were previously reported as such were actually cystic metastases of oropharyngeal carcinomas. We report a true case of primary branchial cleft cyst carcinoma. Our patient was a 42-year-old woman who presented with a painless fluctuant swelling in the right side of her neck. The lesion was completely excised, and pathology identified it as a squamous cell carcinoma in a branchial cleft cyst. Patients with this condition require a careful evaluation of the entire head and neck region, especially the oropharynx, to look for any cystic metastasis of the primary tumor.

A rare case of ameloblastic carcinoma

September 17, 2014     Michael Yunaev, MBBS; Muzib Abdul-Razak, FRCS(Edin); Hedley Coleman, FFOP(RCPA); Yaroslav Mayorchak, MBBS; Ian Kalnins, FRACS
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Abstract

Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare type of ameloblastoma that has received little mention in the literature. While a number of cases have been published over many years, no institution has been able to produce a substantial case series. Ameloblastic carcinoma originates in the embryonic tooth components. It is believed to be an aggressive tumor that can metastasize; once metastasis occurs, the prognosis tends to be poor. Ameloblastic carcinoma is primarily a surgical condition that is best treated with resection; there has been little indication that other modalities are helpful. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman who was found to have a mandibular lesion by a dentist. After surgical resection, the tumor was found to be an ameloblastic carcinoma. The patient recovered without complication, and she was recurrence-free 18 months postoperatively. We also briefly review the available literature on the natural history of and management options for this rare tumor.

Using a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap to prevent postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy: A study of 88 cases

August 27, 2014     Masoud Naghibzadeh, MD; Ramin Zojaji, MD; Nematollah Mokhtari Amir Majdi, MD; Morteza Mazloum Farsi Baf, MD
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Abstract

Complications of total laryngectomy can have serious implications for the final outcome of treatment, including pharyngocutaneous fistula. We conducted a retrospective study of surgical techniques to determine how to best prevent or decrease the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula following total laryngectomy. We reviewed the hospital records of all patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma at Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, from March 1989 through February 2005. We identified 88 such patients-80 men and 8 women. We divided this cohort into two groups according to the type of pharyngeal defect closure they received. A total of 37 patients-31 men and 6 women (mean age: 61.4 ± 5.9 yr) underwent primary closure along with a sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCMM) flap (flap group). The other 51 patients-49 men and 2 women (mean age: 61.3 ± 4.4 yr)-underwent standard primary closure without creation of an SCMM flap (nonflap group). Overall, postoperative pharyngocutaneous fistula occurred in 9 of the 88 patients (10.2%)-1 case in the flap group (2.7%) and 8 cases in the nonflap group (15.7%). The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 0.612, 95% confidence interval = 0.451 to 0.832), independent of other factors. We found no correlation between fistula development and age (p = 0.073), sex (p = 0.065), or tumor location (p = 0.435). Likewise, we found no correlation between tumor location and either sex (p = 0.140) or age (p = 0.241). We conclude that including an SCMM flap in the surgical process would significantly decrease the development of fistula, regardless of age, sex, and tumor site.

Meningeal carcinomatosis in undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A case report

July 13, 2014     Daniel M. Cushman, MD; German Giese, MD; Panta Rouhani, MD, PhD, MPH
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Abstract

Meningeal carcinomatosis is the tumoral invasion of the leptomeninges. It is caused by the spread of malignant cells throughout the subarachnoid space, which produces signs and symptoms due to multifocal involvement. Cranial nerve symptoms are the most common focal findings. The diagnosis is usually made by imaging and/or cytology. Head and neck cancers are the cause of approximately 2% of all cases of meningeal carcinomatosis; in very rare cases, they are caused by a nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We report a case of meningeal carcinomatosis that was caused by a recurrence of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The patient, a 60-year-old woman, experienced no focal neurologic symptoms and exhibited no radiologic evidence of meningeal involvement. We also review the literature on meningeal carcinomatosis secondary to nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Sebaceous carcinoma of the parotid gland: A case report and review of the literature

June 8, 2014     Alexander Manteghi, DO; Seth Zwillenberg, MD; Vivian Arguello-Guerra, MD
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Abstract

Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare malignancy primarily affecting the periocular sebaceous glands. Sebaceous carcinoma of the parotid gland is exceedingly rare, with only 30 cases reported in the literature. Our case brings this total to 31. We present a case involving a 57-year-old man with a slowly enlarging, right tail-of-parotid mass abutting the ear lobule with overlying skin discoloration. Excision of the mass with superficial parotidectomy was performed, and microscopic examination demonstrated sebaceous carcinoma with positive margins. Subsequently, the patient underwent a completion parotidectomy and inferior auriculectomy with no evidence of residual tumor. Six months after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, the patient remains tumor-free. The clinical and morphologic features of this tumor are discussed.

Extensive basal cell carcinoma of the face: An extreme case of denial

June 8, 2014     Soroush Zaghi, MD; Pedram Ghasri, MD; Paul Busse, MD, PhD; John Clark, MD; Kevin Emerick, MD
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Abstract

Patients with head and neck cancer are particularly susceptible to using denial as a coping mechanism. While some forms of denial may help patients achieve better levels of physical functioning, persistent denial can serve as a major barrier to treatment. We report a case of extreme denial by a 60-year-old woman with an extensive basal cell carcinoma of the face that had been neglected for more than 20 years. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential danger of denial, and we discuss strategies that physicians can undertake to properly manage patients who engage in it. Since the diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer can result in profound psychological trauma, gaining an appreciation for how patients cope with it is an important part of the comprehensive care of head and neck oncology patients.

Metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma presenting as a sphenoid sinus mass and meningeal carcinomatosis

June 8, 2014     Hilwati Hashim, MBBCh, MRad; Kartini Rahmat, MBBS, MRad; Yang Faridah Abdul Aziz, MBBS, MRad; Patricia Ann Chandran, MD, MPath
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Abstract

We report the case of a 30-year-old woman who was referred to us for evaluation of a 2-week history of fever, headache, vomiting, bilateral ptosis, and blurred vision. Imaging obtained by the referring institution had identified a sphenoid sinus mass and diffuse meningeal infiltration, which was thought to represent an infective process. We subsequently identified the mass as a metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The patient was placed under palliative care, and she died 1 month later. Metastases to the sphenoid sinus from any primary source are very rare, and they are generally not considered in the radiologic differential diagnosis. HCC is known to metastasize to the lung, lymph nodes, and musculoskeletal system; again, reported cases of metastasis to the sphenoid sinus are rare. Indeed, our review of the English-language literature found only 6 previously reported cases of sinonasal metastasis of a primary HCC. A diagnosis of a sinonasal metastasis is more difficult in a patient who has no previous diagnosis of a primary malignancy. In presenting this case, our aim is to remind readers of this possibility.

Metastatic cervical carcinoma from an unknown primary: Literature review

May 7, 2014     Rodrigo Arrangoiz, MS, MD; Tom J. Galloway, MD; Pavlos Papavasiliou, MD; John A. Ridge, MD, PhD; Miriam N. Lango, MD
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Abstract

Carcinoma of an unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors for which no primary site can be detected following a thorough history, physical examination, and noninvasive and invasive testing. CUP presenting with metastasis to the neck (metastatic cervical carcinoma from an unknown primary [MCCUP]) has been an enigma since von Volkmann first described it in 1882 as a cancer arising in a branchial cleft cyst. Genetic studies have shed some light on this unusual entity. In most cases, clinical features, imaging studies, and a meticulous assessment of the upper aerodigestive tract should assist in identifying the source of disease. Molecular testing of cytologic specimens for Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus (HPV) can facilitate identification of the primary site in the nasopharynx and oropharynx. At least 25% of MCCUPs are directly attributable to HPV-related malignancies, and this number can be expected to increase. Minimally invasive transoral mucosal sampling can identify an otherwise clinically and radiologically occult cancer. We performed a literature review with the objective of discussing the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, and management of MCCUP.

Early detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 serology assay

March 18, 2014     Achmad C. Romdhoni, MD, PhD; Nurul Wiqoyah, MS; Widodo Ario Kentjono, MD, PhD
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Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common head and neck malignancy in Indonesia. Overall, it ranks fourth in males and sixth in females as the most prevalent type of cancer in that country. The data show that in the year 2011, NPC incidence was considered to be intermediate (6.2/100,000 population per year). Through histopathologic examination, about 70 to 80% of these cases were found to be type III according to the WHO classificaton. NPC carries an excellent prognosis if treated early, but most patients presented with stage III to IV disease, which negatively affected the cure rate and increased the mortality rate. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) IgA serology has been established as an effective marker for NPC. Therefore, biologic markers, DNA, and/or antibody-based diagnosis is needed to decrease NPC cases. A screening program needs to be developed that will identify people at high risk of NPC and those who are in the early stage of the disease. In this study, 20 samples were collected from posttherapy patients. An otolaryngologic examination, histopathology of nasopharyngeal tissue, and blood testing for serologic markers were performed. IgA anti-EBNA1 + VCA-p18 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed positive impact as a tool for confirming the diagnosis of NPC, but it still has to be combined with other specific diagnostic tools for post-therapy monitoring and for determining prognosis.

Merkel cell carcinoma

March 18, 2014     Jeffrey D. Shiffer, MD; Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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The expected 5-year survival rate for patients with Merkel cell carcinoma is more than 80% if the tumor is less than 2 cm and has not metastasized. Once a tumor has metastasized regionally, the 5-year survival rate drops to about 50%.

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the pinna: Report of a rare case

January 21, 2014     Anil Jain, MS; Ashish Katarkar, MS; Pankaj Shah, MS; Jignasa Bhalodia, MD; Sanyogita Jain, MD; Sapna Katarkar, DA
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Abstract

Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is rare. We report a case of BSCC in a 60-year-old woman who presented with a bleeding vascular growth on the left pinna. To the best of our knowledge, no case of BSCC of the pinna has been previously reported in the literature. We present this case to alert physicians that this highly aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma can appear on the pinna and therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in this area.

Recurrence of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma manifesting as a cerebellopontine angle mass

December 20, 2013     Min Han Kong, MS; Jahendran Jeevanan, MS; Thanabalan Jegan, MS
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Abstract

As many as 31% of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma present with intracranial extension. Despite this high percentage, extension to the cerebellopontine angle is rare. The mechanism of tumor spread to the cerebellopontine angle is not completely understood. The most likely mechanism is direct extension to the skull base with involvement of the petrous apex and further extension posteriorly via the medial tentorial edge. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who had been treated initially with chemoradiation and subsequently with stereotactic radiosurgery for residual tumor. One year later, she presented with an intracranial recurrence of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the cerebellopontine angle; the recurrence mimicked a benign tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor was ultimately diagnosed as an undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal origin. She was treated with palliative chemotherapy.

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