Apnea

Analysis of the vertebrobasilar system in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

August 21, 2013     Umit Taskin, MD; Ozgur Yigit, MD; Ayse S. Sisman, MD; Sahin Ogreden, MD; Elad Azizli, MD; Fatih Kantarci, MD; and Ismail Mihmanli, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the vertebrobasilar system in adults with and without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Our study population was made up of 48 patients with OSA and 21 healthy volunteers who served as controls; the OSA patients were subdivided into one group with mild or moderate OSA (n = 22) and another with severe OSA (n = 26). Each participant underwent Doppler ultrasonography three times to measure the diameter of the vertebral artery, the peak systolic velocity (PSV), the resistive index (RI), and the vertebral artery flow volume; the mean of the three measurements was calculated for each patient, for the OSA and control groups, and for various subgroups. No significant differences in vessel diameter, PSV, or RI were seen among any of the subgroups. Overall, the vertebral artery flow volume was slightly, but not significantly, higher in all patients with OSA (206 ml/min) than in the control group (177 ml/min); this difference might reflect the body's daytime response to the chronic apneic events experienced during sleep. The only statistically significant difference we found was in vertebral artery flow volume between the controls and the subgroup with mild or moderate OSA (p = 0.026); no difference was seen between the controls and the patients with severe OSA (p = 0.318). Likewise, no significant difference in any of the four parameters was seen when patients were subclassified by body mass index and arterial oxygen saturation level.

Multilevel treatment of moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea with bone-anchored pharyngeal suspension sutures

August 21, 2013     Eric E. Berg, MD; Frederick Bunge, MD; and John M. DelGaudio, MD
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Abstract

Success rates for the surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) vary, with phase I surgical success ranging from 40 to 75%. Pharyngeal suspension suture procedures are minimally invasive techniques with a reported efficacy of 20 to 78%. We conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of pharyngeal suspension suture procedures in conjunction with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) as a multilevel treatment for OSA. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 30 adults-22 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 49 years and a mean BMI of 30.6-who were treated at a tertiary care academic medical center and a private otolaryngology practice. All patients had moderate or severe OSA, and all had failed continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Of this group, 20 patients underwent tongue base and hyoid suspension (TBHS) and 10 underwent tongue base suspension (TBS) alone; 23 patients had undergone concurrent or previous UPPP, 13 in the TBHS group and all 10 in the TBS group. Polysomnography was performed an average of 3.9 months postoperatively. Surgical success was defined as a reduction in respiratory distress index (RDI) of more than 50% and a postoperative RDI of 20 or less. The overall surgical success rate was 63% (19/30). In the surgical success group, the mean RDI fell from 44.6 to 9.4 (p < 0.0001); in the surgical failure group, the mean RDI rose from 41.3 to 48.9 (p = 0.58). There were 6 complications: 3 seromas, 2 suture breaks, and 1 dislodged screw. We conclude that pharyngeal suspension suture procedures as part of the multilevel treatment of moderate and severe OSA yields better outcomes than conventional surgical treatments with the added benefit of being minimally invasive.

Supraglottoplasty for airway obstruction

June 11, 2013     Nausheen Jamal, MD; Farhad Chowdhury, DO; Reena Gupta, MD; and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS
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Supraglottoplasty may be helpful in a patient with tracheotomy-dependent  adult obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome that is causally related to or aggravated by supraglottic obstruction.

Hypopharyngeal lipoma causing obstructive sleep apnea: Discovery on dental cone-beam CT

March 24, 2013     Ashok Balasundaram, BDS, DDS, MDS, MS, Diplomate ABOMR
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Abstract

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is primarily used for a variety of dental purposes, but it may also yield nondental findings that can have significant implications for patient health. For example, physicians should be aware that CBCT can identify some of the etiopathogenic causes of obstructive sleep apnea, as occurred in the case described in this report. The patient was a 76-year-old man who presented to a dentist for implant therapy. A CBCT that had been performed in preparation for dental implant placement revealed the presence of a large hypopharyngeal lesion that was obstructing the airway. An otolaryngologist excised the lesion, which on biopsy proved to be a lipoma. Following removal of the lesion, the patient's episodic sleep apnea and snoring resolved. Medical physicians should be aware of maxillofacial CBCT technology and its ability to identify lesions that could cause potential life-threatening situations.

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome induced by laryngeal lesions: Two cases

October 31, 2012     Taha Tahir Bekci, MD; Mesut Tezer, MD; Nurdogan Ata, MD; Levent Emre, MD
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Abstract

We describe 2 cases of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) that were found to be caused by the presence of laryngeal masses. Both patients presented with a long-standing history of snoring, gasping for air while sleeping, excessive daytime sleepiness, and morning headaches. In both patients, the lesions were discovered by fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy. Patient 1, a 46-year-old man, declined surgery, and his lesions (and OSAS) resolved spontaneously in 4 months. Patient 2, a 39-year-old man, did undergo excision of his mass, and he also experienced an alleviation of OSAS.

A comparison of unilevel and multilevel surgery in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

August 10, 2012     Ümit Tunçel, MD; Hasan Mete İnançlı, MD; Şefik Sinan Kürkçüoğlu, MD; Murat Enoz, MD
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study of 35 adults who had undergone tongue base suspension in addition to other surgery for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our goal was to determine the most effective surgical approach by comparing these patients’ preoperative apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) with their postoperative scores at 6 months. The 35 patients were divided into three groups based on a preoperative assessment of their level of airway obstruction; the assessment included a determination of AHI and endoscopic findings during the Müller maneuver. Patients in group 1 (n = 9) exhibited unilevel obstruction, and they were treated with lateral pharyngoplasty; patients in group 2 (n = 13) also had unilevel obstruction, and they underwent Z-palatoplasty; patients in group 3 (n = 13) had multilevel obstruction, and they underwent combined surgery. Postoperatively, all three groups exhibited statistically significant improvements in AHI, but we determined that of the three approaches, multilevel surgery was significantly more effective (p < 0.001).

Hyoid suspension surgery with UPPP for the treatment of hypopharyngeal airway obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea

August 10, 2012     Selmin Karataylı-Özgürsoy, MD; Alp Demireller, MD
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Abstract

We report our experience with hyoid suspension surgery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) diagnosed on the basis of polysomnographic criteria. We conducted a prospective, observational study of 20 patients—18 males and 2 females, aged 15 to 52 years (mean: 42.1)—who were treated at our tertiary care center. All patients underwent hyoid suspension surgery and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) in a single session. Postoperative success was defined as either (1) a reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from 20 or higher to less than 20 or (2) a reduction in AHI of at least 50%. Postoperative follow-up polysomnography indicated that surgery was successful in 18 of 20 patients (90%). No important complications were observed. We conclude that hyoid suspension surgery is an effective procedure with low morbidity for the treatment of OSA in selected patients with hypopharyngeal obstruction. We believe it is a good option for those patients who will not or cannot tolerate therapy with continuous positive airway pressure.

Thyroidectomy for goiter relieves obstructive sleep apnea: Results of 8 cases

July 13, 2011     Mark T. Agrama, MD
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Abstract

The author conducted a retrospective study of 8 adults with euthyroid goiter that had resulted in tracheal compression and led to moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of thyroidectomy on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in these patients and to determine if there is a relationship between tracheal compression and OSA. These patients had been treated by the author in a community hospital over a 4-year period. All 8 patients had reported compressive symptoms of orthopnea and dysphagia, and 3 of them also reported dyspnea. Computed tomography of the neck and chest had been used to confirm the extent of goiter and tracheal compression. OSA had been confirmed with preoperative polysomnography. At 90 days post-thyroidectomy, repeat polysomnography had been obtained. At follow-up, all 8 patients had reported symptomatic control of compressive symptoms, and 7 patients had demonstrated postoperative improvement in their AHI. Overall, the mean postoperative AHI had decreased from 52.1 to 36.6-a statistically significant reduction of 29.8% (p < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that thyroidectomy for tracheal compression secondary to goiter can significantly alleviate symptoms and improve AHI in those patients who experience OSA. Evaluation of all patients with OSA should include screening for goiter-induced tracheal compression.

Massive lymphoid hyperplasia presenting with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to lingual and palatine tonsil hyperplasia

March 31, 2011     Gül Özbilen Acar, MD, Murat Yener, MD, Harun Cansiz, MD, Engin Acio&gbreve;lu, MD, and Nukhet Tuziner, MD
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Abstract

Lingual tonsil hyperplasia is a rare condition that may cause obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In the management of OSA, the lingual tonsils should be evaluated during the otorhinolaryngologic examination. We report the case of a 66-year-old man with findings of upper airway obstruction secondary to excessive lingual and palatine tonsil hyperplasia and with MRI findings of bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. We review the clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic aspects of this case, and we discuss the surgical options for treating massive reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in conjunction with OSA.

An aberrant internal carotid artery discovered during evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea: A report of 2 cases with consideration of a possible association

January 1, 2011     Andrew C. Picel, MD and Terence M. Davidson, MD
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Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is often associated with reduced pharyngeal muscle tone and an anatomically narrowed pharyngeal airspace. We describe 2 cases of aberrant internal carotid arteries that were diagnosed during evaluations of patients with suspected OSA. It is possible that these anatomic anomalies contributed to airspace narrowing in these patients. These 2 cases represent an interesting presentation of sleep apnea, and they provide a reminder of the importance of clinically recognizing carotid artery aberrations in order to avoid arterial damage during routine oropharyngeal procedures.

Esophageal hamartoma as an unusual cause of neonatal apnea and bradycardia

March 1, 2010     Jeffrey Coury, DO, Jonathan Steinfeld, MD, David Zwillenberg, MD, and Seth Zwillenberg, MD
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Abstract

Esophageal hamartoma is a rare entity, as only 7 cases have been previously reported in the English-language literature. Common symptoms include dysphagia, weight loss, and vomiting. Life-threatening airway obstruction can also occur. Because of the nonspecific nature of the symptoms, patients with these dangerous polyps are often misdiagnosed as having more common entities such as gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcer disease, or achalasia. Most of these tumors are missed on esophagoscopy and radiologic studies, and they can go undiagnosed for years. We diagnosed an esophageal hamartoma in an infant girl who had first presented when she was 8 days old with symptoms of apnea and cyanosis. The patient had undergone a multitude of tests since her birth, and she was eventually diagnosed with episodic bradycardia. When the patient was 6 weeks old, we discovered a polyp on nasopharyngolaryngoscopy, and we removed it by microdirect laryngoscopy and esophagoscopy. This patient was the youngest of the 8 who have now been reported to have been diagnosed with a hamartomatous polyp, and she was the only one to have presented with apnea (secondary to airway obstruction) and bradycardia. We recommend microdirect laryngoscopy and esophagoscopy to remove these pedunculated cervical esophageal lesions. A transcervical approach is warranted for sessile distal esophageal polyps. Esophageal polyps are an interesting entity in view of their rarity and intriguing presentations. Because esophageal obstructions can be life-threatening, further evaluation by laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and esophagoscopy is warranted when symptoms of dysphagia, vomiting, intermittent apnea, bradycardia, and weight loss persist despite conventional treatment.

The safety of outpatient UPPP for obstructive sleep apnea: A retrospective review of 40 cases

July 31, 2008     Ali M. Strocker, MD, Alen N. Cohen, MD, and Marilene B. Wang, MD
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Abstract

We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 40 patients who had undergone outpatient uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in order to determine the safety of the procedure in an outpatient setting. Postoperatively, 36 of the 40 patients (90%) were discharged home the day of surgery without morbidity; 3 other patients stayed overnight for nonmedical reasons, and 1 patient who was already an inpatient remained hospitalized for unrelated medical issues. No postoperative complications occurred, and all patients reported a resolution of OSA symptoms and improvement in sleep. Based on a combination of our data and those of previous studies, we conclude that patients with significant OSA can safely undergo UPPP as an outpatient procedure. We recommend that guidelines regarding the perioperative care of patients with OSA be adjusted to include consideration of treatment in an outpatient setting.

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