Anomaly

Diplopia: An uncommon presentation of silent sinus syndrome

July 20, 2015     Juan Gomez, MD; David Liu, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD; Jeremy Nguyen, MD
article

The etiology of the disease is based on the primary predisposing factor, which is an obstruction of the ostiomeatal complex that results in hypoventilation of the maxillary sinus gases

Duplication of the right internal jugular vein: A case report

June 4, 2015     Srinivasalu Bathala, FRCS(ORL-HNS); Zvoru G. Makura, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
article

Abstract

We present a case of duplication of the right internal jugular vein (IJV) in a patient who underwent neck dissection as part of the management of carcinoma of the larynx. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented to the otolaryngology department with a 7-month history of hoarseness and a 3-week history of noisy breathing. Flexible endoscopy detected a transglottic tumor that had extended beyond the vocal folds. The patient underwent a total laryngectomy and bilateral selective neck dissection at levels II-VI. Intraoperatively, the right IJV was noted to be duplicated. The duplicate segment was approximately 10 cm in length, and it rejoined the normal vein before the normal vein joined the subclavian vein.

Dehiscent high jugular bulb attached to the tympanic membrane

June 4, 2015     Hiroshi Sakaida, MD, PhD; Kazuhiko Takeuchi, MD, PhD
article

The differential diagnosis of high jugular bulb includes cholesterol granuloma, aberrant carotid artery, and tumors such as paraganglioma or schwannoma.

Large Haller cell mucocele leading to maxillary sinusitis

April 27, 2015     Jae-Hoon Lee, MD
article

Paranasal sinus mucoceles are epithelial-lined cystic lesions containing mucus or mucopurulent fluid. Symptoms vary depending on the location of the mucocele.

Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear

February 2, 2015     Shubin Chen, MD; Yongxin Li, MD
article

Abstract

Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear is a rare entity. It is believed to be a developmental abnormality that may be associated with anomalies of adjacent structures. We describe the case of a 6-year-old girl who had a salivary gland choristoma in the middle ear that was associated with an ossicular chain anomaly and a facial nerve anomaly. We discuss the clinical features and management of this condition, and we review the literature.

Arrested development: Lingual thyroid gland

January 19, 2015     Mark R. Williams, MRCS(ENT); Vivek Kaushik, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
article

Most patients with lingual thyroid are asymptomatic and are diagnosed incidentally following a radiologic investigation for another condition of the head and neck.

Management of soft palate agenesis in Nager syndrome with an elongated, superiorly based pharyngeal flap

October 17, 2014     Oneida A. Arosarena, MD; Troy Hemme, DO
article

Abstract

Nager syndrome, or preaxial acrofacial dysostosis, is associated with aberrant development of the first and second branchial arch structures, as well as abnormal development of the limb buds. It is a rare disorder, and its clinical manifestations have not been completely defined. Absence of the soft palate has been reported in patients with Nager syndrome. In this report we describe the use of an elongated, superiorly based pharyngeal flap for the treatment of severe velopharyngeal insufficiency in a patient with Nager syndrome and absence of the soft palate. We also describe the dysmorphisms associated with Nager syndrome and present a differential diagnosis for the condition.

Complete second branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a fistula and a tonsillar cyst: An interesting congenital anomaly

October 17, 2014     Prasad John Thottam, DO; Samba S. Bathula, MD; Janet M. Poulik, MD; David N. Madgy, DO
article

Abstract

Branchial cleft anomalies make up 30% of all pediatric neck masses, but complete second branchial cleft anomalies are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of a complete second branchial cleft anomaly that presented as a draining neck fistula and a tonsillar cyst in an otherwise healthy 3-month-old girl. At the age of 7 months, the patient had been experiencing feeding difficulties, and there was increasing concern about the risk of persistent infections. At that point, the anomaly was excised in its entirety. Our suspicion that the patient had a complete second branchial cleft anomaly was confirmed by imaging, surgical excision, and histopathologic analysis.

Congenital airway anomaly of double aortic arch in a 2-day-old infant

October 17, 2014     Seo Moon, MD; Jessica Mayor, MD; Ramzi Younis, MD
article

Double aortic vascular ring is a complete vascular ring that is formed when the distal portion of the right dorsal aorta fails to regress and the ascending aorta bifurcates to surround and compress both trachea and esophagus and rejoins to form the descending aorta.

A persistent left superior vena cava, with the accessory nerve passing through a duplicate segment of the left internal jugular vein: A unique presentation

October 17, 2014     Omar Ayoub, MSc, FRCSEd(ORL-HNS); Jamie Benton, MRCS; Shaun Jackson, FRCSEd
article

Abstract

The internal jugular vein and the spinal accessory nerve are important landmarks during neck dissection; unexpected variations in their positions can result in inadvertent iatrogenic damage to adjacent structures. We report the case of a 79-year-old man who was found during neck dissection to have a duplicate segment of his left internal jugular vein (IJV), a persistent left superior vena cava, and an absent right superior vena cava. The spinal accessory nerve passed through the duplicate section of the IJV. A MEDLINE search found no previously reported case of these anomalies occurring together. We also review 10 previously reported cases of IJV duplication. Finally, we discuss the embryologic and anatomic background of these malformations so that otolaryngologists may be aware that identification of such anomalies may help to prevent postoperative morbidity.

Second branchial cleft anomaly with an ectopic tooth: A case report

September 17, 2014     Jennifer C. Alyono, MD; Paul Hong, MD; Nathan C. Page, MD; Denise Malicki, MD, PhD; Marcella R. Bothwell, MD
article

Abstract

Branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulas are the most common congenital lateral neck lesions in children. They arise as a result of an abnormal development of the branchial arches and their corresponding ectoderm-lined branchial clefts. Of these diverse anomalies, second branchial cleft lesions are the most common, accounting for approximately 95% of all branchial arch pathologies. We describe what is to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of an ectopic tooth in a branchial cleft anomaly. The patient was a young girl who had other congenital abnormalities and syndromic features and who was eventually diagnosed with Townes-Brocks syndrome. We describe the clinical presentation, management, pathologic analysis, and postoperative outcomes of this case, and we present a brief review of Townes-Brocks syndrome.

Petrosquamosal sinus discovered during mastoidectomy, and its radiologic appearance on temporal bone CT: Case report and brief review

July 13, 2014     Hyun Joon Shim, MD; Seong Jun Song, MD; Ki Woong Chung, MD; Sang Won Yoon, MD
article

Abstract

We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who underwent a mastoidectomy. Preoperative computed tomography demonstrated an unusually distended bony canal that passed through the superolateral portion of the right petrous bone. Intraoperatively, we identified the anomaly as a petrosquamosal sinus (PSS). This unusually dilated venous channel had arisen from the adjacent sigmoid sinus. A PSS is an emissary vein of the posterior fossa that courses along the petrosquamosal junction, connecting the sigmoid or transverse sinus with the extracranial venous system. While it usually regresses during fetal life, a dilated PSS occasionally persists into adulthood. Its anatomic course may lead to problematic bleeding during mastoidectomy.

Page
of 7Next