Anomaly

Second branchial cleft anomaly with an ectopic tooth: A case report

September 17, 2014     Jennifer C. Alyono, MD; Paul Hong, MD; Nathan C. Page, MD; Denise Malicki, MD, PhD; Marcella R. Bothwell, MD
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Abstract

Branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulas are the most common congenital lateral neck lesions in children. They arise as a result of an abnormal development of the branchial arches and their corresponding ectoderm-lined branchial clefts. Of these diverse anomalies, second branchial cleft lesions are the most common, accounting for approximately 95% of all branchial arch pathologies. We describe what is to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of an ectopic tooth in a branchial cleft anomaly. The patient was a young girl who had other congenital abnormalities and syndromic features and who was eventually diagnosed with Townes-Brocks syndrome. We describe the clinical presentation, management, pathologic analysis, and postoperative outcomes of this case, and we present a brief review of Townes-Brocks syndrome.

Petrosquamosal sinus discovered during mastoidectomy, and its radiologic appearance on temporal bone CT: Case report and brief review

July 13, 2014     Hyun Joon Shim, MD; Seong Jun Song, MD; Ki Woong Chung, MD; Sang Won Yoon, MD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who underwent a mastoidectomy. Preoperative computed tomography demonstrated an unusually distended bony canal that passed through the superolateral portion of the right petrous bone. Intraoperatively, we identified the anomaly as a petrosquamosal sinus (PSS). This unusually dilated venous channel had arisen from the adjacent sigmoid sinus. A PSS is an emissary vein of the posterior fossa that courses along the petrosquamosal junction, connecting the sigmoid or transverse sinus with the extracranial venous system. While it usually regresses during fetal life, a dilated PSS occasionally persists into adulthood. Its anatomic course may lead to problematic bleeding during mastoidectomy.

An abnormal sigmoid sinus with a dire clinical implication

June 8, 2014     Perianan Puraviappan, MS(ORL); Naryanan Prepageran, FRCS Ed; Cheng Ai Ong, MS(ORL); Raffique Abd Karim, MS(ORL); Omkara Rubini Lingham, MS(ORL); Rajagopalan Raman, MS(ORL)
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In reviewing CT scans before surgery, the location of the sigmoid sinus should always be noted.

Pseudo third cranial nerve palsy secondary to orbital ectopic lacrimal gland cyst: Management with functional endoscopic sinus surgery

February 12, 2014     Puneet S. Braich, BSc; Jonathan E. Silbert, MD; Andrew J. Levada, MD; and Neil R. Schiff, MD
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Abstract

An otherwise healthy 13-month-old girl was noted by her pediatrician to have developed a left head turn. The patient was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist, who noticed signs of incomplete third cranial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of an abnormal lesion in the inferonasal orbit that was abutting the ethmoid sinus. After consultation with an ENT specialist, the decision was made to remove the lesion via functional endoscopic sinus surgery because this approach was deemed to provide adequate access while limiting morbidity. Histology of the excised lesion identified it as true ectopic lacrimal gland tissue with cysts. We recognize and comment on the fact that in many reported cases of ectopic lacrimal gland cyst, the tissue was not ectopic at all but instead represented an extension of normal lacrimal gland tissue.

The significance of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings in sphenoid sinus agenesis

February 12, 2014     Lokman Uzun, MD; Omer Faik Sagun, MD; Bulent Seferoglu, MD; Omer Etlik, MD; and Kamran Mahmutyazicioglu, MD
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Abstract

Agenesis of the sphenoid sinuses is a very rarely encountered anatomic variation. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging can mislead the radiologist and clinician. Therefore, the gold standard for diagnosis is computed tomography (CT) of the paranasal sinuses. We present the case of a 28-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with a 3-month history of headache. CT of the paranasal sinuses revealed isolated bilateral sphenoid sinus agenesis.

When is a neck lump not a neck lump? Initial presentation of a solitary sternocleidomastoid muscle in an adult

January 21, 2014     Sonia Kumar, MRCS; Suzie Jervis, MRCS; Harpreet Uppal, FRCS(ORL-HNS)
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Abstract

A 70-year-old woman was referred to us for evaluation of a presumed left-sided neck mass. The referral was based on the visual appearance of subtle neck asymmetry. The patient reported no ENT symptoms. Clinical examination and ultrasonography identified no pathology, but computed tomography revealed that the asymmetry was present because the patient's right sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) was absent. The SCM on the left side was normal. Congenital absence of an SCM is uncommon, and to the best of our knowledge, an initial presentation in an adult has not been previously reported in the literature.

Progressive blindness caused by an unusual sphenoid sinus dehiscence

September 18, 2013     Mariana Marquez, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Jeremy Nguyen, MD; Harold R. Neitzschman, MD, FACR, FACNM, FAAP
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The optic nerve and other important structures in the anterior skull base can be involved in chronic sphenoidal sinus disease.

Coexisting first and bilateral second branchial fistulas in a child with nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome

July 21, 2013     Jose Florencio F. Lapena Jr., MA, MD; Genilou Liv M. Jimena, MD
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Abstract

We describe what we believe is only the third reported case of coexisting first and bilateral second branchial fistulas associated with nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome. The patient was a 6-year-old girl who presented with bilaterally draining anterior neck puncta, a preauricular sinus, and moderately severe bilateral hearing loss. She had no family history of branchial anomalies. Compared with branchial cysts and sinuses, branchial fistulas are rare. Even more rare are bilateral second branchial fistulas coexisting with first branchial anomalies, as only 10 cases have been previously reported in the English-language literature. Of these 10 cases, 5 were associated with either branchio-otic syndrome or branchio-oto-renal syndrome; 2 patients had familial branchio-otic syndrome, 2 had nonfamilial branchio-otic syndrome, and 1 had nonfamilial branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

Relief from cluster headaches following extraction of an ipsilateral infected tooth

June 11, 2013     Matthew R. Hoffman, PhD; and Timothy M. McCulloch, MD
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Abstract

A 60-year-old man with a 7-year history of cluster headaches was seen by an oral surgeon for evaluation of pain in the left upper second molar ipsilateral to the side affected by the headaches. During extraction of the tooth, infection, decay, and inflammation were discovered. Since the extraction in November 2008, the patient has experienced one episode of cluster headaches as of April 2013.

Anterior jugular phlebectasia and tinnitus: A case report

March 24, 2013     Roshan Kumar Verma, MS, DNB, MNAMS; Rahul Modi, MS; Naresh K. Panda, MS, DNB, FRCS
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Abstract

Abnormal dilation of a normal anterior jugular vein is a rare anomaly and usually presents as a neck lump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of such a case in which the patient presented with severe tinnitus. Excision of the dilated portion of the anterior jugular vein in our patient alleviated the severe tinnitus.

Internal carotid artery in zone IIb and its implications: A case report

March 24, 2013     Drew P. Plonk, MD; J. Dale Browne, MD, FACS
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Abstract

The potential for aberrant anatomy in the neck should be respected in order to avoid unexpected and potentially devastating injury during surgical and other procedures. Anatomic variations involving the internal carotid artery are believed to exist in as much as 6% of the population. We describe a case of a tortuous internal carotid artery that was found in zone IIb during a neck dissection in a 60-year-old man, and we discuss the implications of this anomaly.

Intranasal tooth and associated rhinolith in a patient with cleft lip and palate

March 24, 2013     Gisele da Silva Dalben, DDS, MSc; Vivian Patricia S. Vargas, DDS; Bruno A. Barbosa, MSc; Marcia R. Gomide, PhD; Alberto Consolaro, PhD
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Abstract

We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who presented with a complaint of a malodorous bloody discharge from the left naris. The patient had previously undergone a complete repair of left-sided cleft lip and palate. Clinical examination revealed hyperplasia of the nasal mucosa on the left side. X-ray examination of the nasal cavity demonstrated a radiopaque structure that resembled a tooth and a radiopaque mass similar to an odontoma that was adherent to the root of the suspected tooth. With the patient under general anesthesia, the structure was removed. On gross inspection, the structure was identified as a tooth with a rhinolith attached to the surface of its root. Microscopic examination revealed normal dentin and pulp tissue. A nonspecific inflammatory infiltrate was observed around the rhinolith, and areas of regular and irregular mineralization were seen. Some mineralized areas exhibited melanin-like brownish pigmentation. Areas of mucus with deposits of mineral salts were also observed. Rare cases of an intranasal tooth associated with a rhinolith have been described in the literature. We believe that this case represents only the second published report of an intranasal tooth associated with a rhinolith in a patient with cleft lip and palate.

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