Angiosarcoma

Angiosarcoma of the scalp with complete response to a biweekly gemcitabine and docetaxel (GEMDOC) chemotherapy regimen

January 1, 2011     Mahdi A. Shkoukani, MD, Michael A. Carron, MD, Ozlem Tulunay, MD, Omer Kucuk, MD, and Ho-Sheng Lin, MD, FACS
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Abstract

Angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive soft-tissue sarcoma with a high rate of recurrence and distant metastasis. Only a few cases of angiosarcoma involving the scalp have been reported in the literature. We describe a case involving a 75-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department at the Detroit Medical Center with multiple painful scalp lesions. She had had similar lesions intermittently for several years that apparently had responded to treatment with antifungal creams, but those occurring in the 6 months before her presentation had not responded to that therapy. The final diagnosis was a metastatic angiosarcoma. The patient achieved complete remission following treatment with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of gemcitabine (1,500 mg/m2) and docetaxel (50 mg/m2) administered biweekly. The patient was free of disease at the 15-month follow-up. This regimen is well tolerated and should be considered, especially in elderly patients and patients with comorbid conditions who may not tolerate other chemotherapeutic regimens.

Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck: A case presentation and review of the literature

September 30, 2006     Jonathan Glickstein, MD; Merry E. Sebelik, MD; Qing Lu, MD
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Abstract
Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the head and neck is a rare vascular neoplasm. When it does occur, it is most common in elderly white men. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for local control of this aggressive tumor, but recognition can be delayed because of its rarity or because of difficulty in making a pathologic diagnosis. A combined-modality treatment approach is most often advocated. We report the case of a 77-year-old black man who presented with a 1-month history of two painless, violaceous, subcentimeter nodules of the upper lip. After a diagnosis of low-grade angiosarcoma was definitively established, the lesions were locally excised with good cosmetic and functional results. The patient subsequently was found to have probable metastatic disease, but he declined further intervention. We review the literature on cutaneous angiosarcoma, and we discuss its epidemiology, presentation, tissue diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis in an effort to increase awareness of this rare malignancy.

Primary columellar angiosarcoma: A case report

January 1, 2005     Pedro Oliveira, MD; Ricardo Correia, MD; Eugénia Castro, MD; Rosete Almeida, MD; Agostinho Silva, MD
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Abstract
Angiosarcoma of the head and neck, a rare malignancy, is associated with a high degree of invasiveness and poor survival. A high level of suspicion followed by histopathologic and immunohistochemical studies is warranted in order to arrive at a well-timed and accurate diagnosis. We report the case of a 56-year-old man who developed an unusually small neoplasm in the nasal columella. Rapid diagnosis allowed for simple treatment with surgical excision, a rare circumstance because most of these tumors require extensive surgery. Close long-term follow-up of patients with angiosarcoma of the head and neck is vitally important.