Thyroid

Black thyroid

October 17, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MPH, MD; Henry Crist, MD; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
article

Despite the benign impact of minocycline on thyroid function, several studies have reported an association between black thyroid and thyroid cancer.

Medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a supraglottic mass

October 17, 2014     Jeremy White, MD; Ahmed Mohyeldin, MD, PhD; Arnold Schwartz, MD, PhD; Steven Bielamowicz, MD
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Abstract

We report a rare case of medullary thyroid carcinoma that presented as a metastasis to the supraglottic larynx. A 92-year-old man with a 3-month history of voice change and airway obstruction was diagnosed with medullary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the supraglottis. Excision of the mass, total thyroidectomy, and elective neck dissection were recommended, but the patient declined because of his advanced age. Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is a rare neuroendocrine tumor with a poor prognosis when associated with a distant metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid presenting as a supraglottic mass. Total thyroidectomy, neck dissection, and surgical excision of the entire tumor comprise the treatment of choice.

Hypocalcemia after minimally invasive thyroidectomy

September 17, 2014     Doug Massick, MD; Matthew R. Garrett, MD
article

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study to determine the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia following minimally invasive thyroidectomy. During the 2-year study period, 74 patients-16 men and 58 women (mean age: 43.7)-underwent either total or hemithyroidectomy through a 3-cm incision. Postoperative hypocalcemia occurred in 14 of these patients (18.9%)-4 men and 10 women-all of whom underwent total rather than hemithyroidectomy. All these patients received supplementation with calcium and vitamin D for 2 weeks postoperatively in order to regain a normal calcium status, and all demonstrated normal serum calcium levels at 3 weeks. Despite their low calcium levels, none of the 14 patients exhibited any overt symptoms of hypocalcemia. We conclude that minimally invasive thyroidectomy is associated with a low rate of postoperative hypocalcemia that is comparable to the rates previously reported for standard thyroidectomy.

Papillary thyroid cancer in a gravid woman

July 13, 2014     Darrin V. Bann, PhD; Neerav Goyal, MD, MPH; David Goldenberg, MD, FACS
article

All attempts should be made to preserve the recurrent laryngeal nerve with resection of all gross tumor, particularly in cases of known contralateral RLN dysfunction.

Ossifying fibromyxoid tumor metastatic to the thyroid: A case report and review of the literature

June 8, 2014     Ricardo R. Lastra, MD; Jason G. Newman, MD; John S. Brooks, MD; Jui-Han Huang, MD, PhD
article

Abstract

Ossifying fibromyxoid tumors are rare soft-tissue neoplasms, usually with an indolent course. However, atypical/malignant variants have been described, showing either local recurrence after complete excision or metastasis to the lungs, mediastinum, adrenals, or soft tissue. We report the case of an ossifying fibromyxoid tumor of the left ankle that metastasized to the lung and thyroid gland 12 years after the initial diagnosis and surgical treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this neoplasm metastasizing to the thyroid gland.

Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis)

May 7, 2014     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Appropriate management requires lifelong thyroid hormone replacement therapy, resulting in decreased thyroid antibody levels, although complications of therapy may be seen.

Severe symptomatic hypocalcemia following total thyroidectomy in a patient with a history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

January 21, 2014     Justin A. Gross, MD; Steven M. Olsen, MD; Cody A. Koch, MD, PhD; Eric J. Moore, MD
article

Abstract

Patients who undergo a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure are at moderate risk for calcium and vitamin D deficiency. Those who subsequently undergo thyroid or parathyroid surgery are at high risk for developing severe symptomatic hypocalcemia if they are not monitored and adequately treated prophylactically. We describe the case of a morbidly obese 40-year-old man who had undergone RYGB surgery 6 months prior to the discovery of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. He subsequently underwent total thyroidectomy with central and bilateral neck dissection. Following surgery, he developed severe symptomatic hypocalcemia, as his calcium level fell to a nadir of 6.0 mg/dl. He required aggressive oral and intravenous repletion therapy with calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium for 10 days before hospital discharge. Providers should institute careful preoperative screening, patient counseling, and prophylactic calcium and vitamin D therapy for all thyroid surgery patients who have previously undergone RYGB surgery to prevent the development of severe and life-threatening hypocalcemia. Only a few reports of patients have been published on the dangers of thyroid and parathyroid surgery in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery. We report a new case to add to the body of literature on this patient population. We also review calcium homeostasis and supplementation as they relate to this situation.

Primary Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid

December 20, 2013     Samuel Albert, MD
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Abstract

Primary Burkitt lymphoma of the thyroid is extremely rare. The author describes a new case in a 15-year-old boy who presented with a rapidly enlarging thyroid mass and dyspnea.

Undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma

October 23, 2013     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
article

Histologically, undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas show a variety of patterns, from sheet-like, storiform, fascicular, angiomatoid, and meningothelial to solid, exhibiting extensive lymph-vascular invasion.

Thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma: Case report and review of the literature

September 18, 2013     David W. Jang, MD; Andrew G. Sikora, MD, PhD; Anatoly Leytin, MD
article

Abstract

Well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma of a thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) is a rare entity, found in about 1% of all TGDCs. Diagnosis is usually made incidentally after a Sistrunk procedure. Options for further therapy include total thyroidectomy, T4 suppression therapy, and radioactive iodine ablation. In a patient with a normal-appearing thyroid gland and no evidence of metastatic disease, the treatment course is controversial. The recent literature emphasizes the identification of risk factors that may prompt the clinician to pursue more aggressive treatment. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who was found to have a 1-cm midline neck mass that showed atypical cells on fine-needle aspiration. Histologic analysis after a Sistrunk procedure revealed a small focus of papillary carcinoma within the TGDC. The patient subsequently underwent total thyroidectomy with no evidence of carcinoma on histologic examination.

Post-thyroidectomy early serum ionic calcium level: Predictor of prolonged hypocalcemia

August 21, 2013     Sanjana V. Nemade, MS, FCPS(ENT) and Atul P. Chirmade, MS
article

Abstract

One of the more common complications of thyroid surgery is postoperative hypocalcemia, which is potentially serious. Its clinical manifestations range from minimal twitching to life-threatening tetany. Affected patients might require a prolonged hospital stay and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D. In cases of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia, it is not always easy to predict which patients will require close monitoring of serum calcium levels. We conducted a study to determine whether early (<24 hr) measurement of serum ionic calcium (SiCa) levels can predict the development of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 150 adults (144 women and 6 men) who had undergone total or partial thyroidectomy, and we identified 42 patients (all women) who had either transient (<1 mo; n = 27) or prolonged (1 to 6 mo; n = 15) temporary hypocalcemia. We found that the patients who turned out to have prolonged hypocalcemia had significantly lower early levels of SiCa than did the patients who later developed only transient hypocalcemia (p = 0.000002). Also, patients with prolonged hypocalcemia had a significantly higher incidence of serious sequelae, including carpopedal spasms and signs of tetany. We conclude that early measurement of SiCa is a reliable predictor of prolonged temporary hypocalcemia following total or partial thyroidectomy.

Wrong egg in the usual nest: Thyroid papillary carcinoma within a branchial cleft cyst

July 21, 2013     Mustafa Sagit, MD; Ayhan Gokler, MD; Istemihan Akin, MD; Unsal Han, MD
article

Abstract

Branchial cleft cysts are the most common lesions to arise laterally in the neck. Ectopic thyroid tissue within a branchial cleft cyst is rare, and a papillary carcinoma arising from this tissue is extremely rare. We present a case of a lateral neck cyst representing a primary papillary carcinoma that arose in ectopic thyroid tissue within a branchial cleft cyst in a 41-year-old woman. After the mass was surgically excised, thyroid ultrasonography, thyroid scintigraphy, and whole-body F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected no abnormality. The negative findings notwithstanding, surgery on the thyroid gland was planned, but the patient refused it. Therefore, she was followed up with ultrasonography and scintigraphy for 5 years, during which time she exhibited no evidence of recurrence. Total thyroidectomy is still the primary option in such cases, but when it cannot be performed for any reason, vigilant follow-up is essential.

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