Maxilla

Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla: Unusual location and aggressive behavior of a rare histologic variant

September 18, 2013     Ozan Bagis Ozgursoy, MD; Ozden Tulunay, MD; Sami Engin Muz, MD; Gaffar Aslan, MD; Babur Kucuk, MD
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Abstract

Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) of the mucosal membranes has been documented sporadically. The highly aggressive behavior of a mucosal ASCC arising in the oral cavity has been recently reported. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case of maxillary ASCC previously has been reported in the literature. We pre-sent what we believe is only the second case of maxillary ASCC. Our goal is to emphasize the aggressive behavior of this tumor in order to add weight to the argument that the prognosis is poor.

Osteosarcoma

July 21, 2013     Lester D.R. Thompson, MD
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Osteosarcoma affects the mandible and the maxilla differently, with mandibular tumors tending to arise from the body of the mandible while maxillary tumors arise from the alveolar ridge and sinus.

Recurrent Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: A case report and review of the literature

February 25, 2013     Gangadhara Somayaji, MS(ENT); Aroor Rajeshwary, MS(ENT); Sullia Ramesh, MDS; Sullia Dinesh, MDS
article

Abstract

We report a case of recurrent Pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor) of the maxilla. The patient was a 34-year-old woman who had been previously diagnosed with Pindborg tumor and treated with curettage. She was subsequently referred to us for evaluation of nasal obstruction. Examination revealed the presence of a mass lesion in the right nasal cavity and right maxilla, which was identified as a recurrence of her earlier Pindborg tumor. The patient was treated with maxillectomy with orbital preservation. Pindborg tumor is a rare odontogenic tumor; when it does occur, it is more often seen in the mandible than in the maxilla. While this tumor is often treated with curettage alone, the aggressive nature of the recurrence in our patient necessitated radical surgery. We report this case to highlight the need to be suitably aggressive in treating these types of tumors in order to avoid recurrence.

Unusual maxillary chondrosarcoma

September 7, 2012     Daniel O. Rosenblatt, MD; Rosa B. Lipin, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Paul Friedlander, MD; Harold Neitzschman, MD, FACR
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Chondrosarcomas can be distinguished from osteosarcomas because they have the distinction of producing chondroid (cartilaginous matrix) but not osteoid. When they occur in the head and neck, they usually are found in the anterior maxilla and sinonasal structures 

Ectopic canine associated with a dentigerous cyst in the maxilla

June 13, 2011     Jagdeep S. Thakur, MS, Narinder K. Mohindroo, MS, DLO, Dev R. Sharma, MS, Ravinder S. Minhas, MS, DLO, and Anamika Thakur, MD
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Abstract

Ectopic eruption of a tooth is common in the dental arch, palate, and nose, but it is rare in the maxillary antrum. We present the case of a 35-year-old man with an ectopic canine and an associated dentigerous cyst in the maxillary sinus that masqueraded as an antrochoanal polyp.

Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the anterior maxilla: An unusual case and review of the literature

April 30, 2011     Nadia Mohyuddin, MD and Mike Yao, MD
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Abstract

Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the head and neck is rare, and lesions isolated to the anterior maxilla are obviously even more rare. The diagnosis of intraosseous carcinoma can be difficult, and it must be based on strict criteria. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who was referred for definitive treatment of a cancerous lesion of the anterior maxilla. The patient's mass had initially been thought to be a benign odontogenic cyst. The patient was treated with surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation. We describe the clinical presentation, pertinent workup including imaging, and the treatment of this case, and we review the literature.

Primary osteogenic sarcoma of the maxilla

September 30, 2010     Raafat Makary, MD, Sania Shuja, MD, Ruis Fernandes, DMD, MD, Robert Malyapa, MD, and Nelson Goldman, MD
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Calcified maxillary cyst secondary to a foreign-body reaction at the site of a remote tooth extraction

January 1, 2010     Alexander Langerman, MD, Farhad Sigari, MS, MD, and Robert Naclerio, MD
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Abstract

Unilateral sinus disease has a wide differential diagnosis. When a patient has a history of maxillary dental work on the same side as the sinusitis, a foreign entity introduced during or subsequent to the dental manipulation must be considered. We present a case of calcified maxillary cyst that was discovered at the site of a remote tooth extraction. Pathologic analysis revealed the presence of vegetable matter within the cyst. To the best of our knowledge, no case of a maxillary cyst secondary to vegetable matter has been previously reported in the literature.

Surgical treatment is warranted in aggressive central giant cell granuloma: A report of 2 cases

March 1, 2009     Jason Roberts, MD, Carol Shores, MD, and Austin S. Rose, MD
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Abstract

Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign but locally destructive lesion of the mandible or maxilla that presents most often in the second and third decades of life. Reports of treatment include curettage or complete en bloc resection and nonsurgical approaches such as intralesional steroid injections, interferon alfa-2a, and calcitonin. We describe the cases of 2 young adults with CGCG of the maxilla involving the palate. The first patient, an 18-year-old man, was initially treated with a partial maxillectomy via a facial degloving approach and a postoperative series of transoral intralesional steroid injections to the site of the residual hard palate disease. The partial maxillectomy achieved a near-total debulking of the mass and immediate cosmetic improvement, and the steroid injections resulted in initial regression of the residual disease. However, the patient experienced a recurrence 8 months postoperatively, so a bilateral total inferior maxillectomy via a facial degloving approach was performed with subsequent placement of an obturator. No recurrence was seen 15 months following revision surgery. In view of the incomplete resolution of disease with the use of steroid injections in the first patient, we treated the second patient, a 22-year-old woman, with a subtotal maxillectomy without steroid injection. No recurrence of disease was noted 12 months postoperatively. We conclude that a combination of partial surgical resection and intralesional steroid injection may not be sufficient for the treatment of large CGCGs of the maxilla. Complete surgical resection should be considered for the initial treatment of CGCG, particularly in aggressive cases.

Dentigerous cyst of the maxilla with impacted tooth displaced into orbital rim and floor

March 1, 2008     Morton Litvin, DDS, Domenic Caprice, DMD, and Leonard Infranco, DMD
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Abstract

We report a case of dentigerous cyst of the maxilla and maxillary sinus that caused the ectopic displacement of an unerupted tooth into the orbital rim and floor. After an incisional biopsy, marsupialization of the lesion promoted its involution and stimulated osteogenesis. This in turn simplified the surgical enucleation of the specimen and removal of the unerupted tooth without the excessive loss of the bony contours of the maxilla.

Transcranial trigeminal schwannoma

August 31, 2007     Daniel H. Coelho, MD; Nilesh Vasan, MD, FRACS
article

A 51-year-old man fell while hiking and sustained a mild concussion and a fractured lower leg. Computed tomography (CT) of the head detected no intracranial pathology, but it did incidentallyshow a mass in the right infratemporal fossa. 

Odontogenic myxoma of the maxilla

July 31, 2007     Bernardo Boleaga-Durán, MD; Enrique Palacios, MD
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Odontogenic myxomas are rare benign tumors that can exert destructive effects in some cases. They typically affect patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, although some pediatric cases have been reported

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